Duck breasts

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Duck breasts

Postby Pepper Pig » April 21st, 2018, 11:22 am

I bought some enormous ones in Lidl on Wednesday but am at a loss what to do with them that he will like. Any thoughts?
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Re: Duck breasts

Postby suffolk » April 21st, 2018, 12:46 pm

Pan-fried with the skin/fat rendered crispy and with a traditional orange or cherry sauce? Perhaps with Duchesse potatoes ... I seem to remember that combination from the seventies.
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Re: Duck breasts

Postby Ratatouille » April 21st, 2018, 1:54 pm

Does he "do" stir fries?
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Re: Duck breasts

Postby Suelle » April 21st, 2018, 2:29 pm

Pan fry skin side down until crispy, finish in hot oven turned skin side up. At this point you can embellish yours by brushing with something like pomegranate molasses, cranberry jelly, marmalade or whatever you have. A sprinkle of ground Szechuan pepper on top is good too - or some chilli flakes. Don't forget to slash the skin to aid crisping.

Serve with new potatoes (or Charlotte salad potatoes) and a green veg that OH will like. Tenderstem broccoli or a savoy cabbage/kale mixture would be my choice.
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Re: Duck breasts

Postby Pepper Pig » April 21st, 2018, 2:34 pm

Rats he only does stir fries if it’s leftover pork. . .

Suelle that sounds great and I have some pak Choi in the fridge.
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Re: Duck breasts

Postby Suelle » April 21st, 2018, 2:44 pm

Pepper Pig wrote:

Suelle that sounds great and I have some pak Choi in the fridge.


Perfect!
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Re: Duck breasts

Postby liketocook » April 21st, 2018, 6:56 pm

I'd happily eat anyone of the suggestions :D .
I cooked duck breasts last weekend in a pan with butter, rosemary & sage. Made a duck stock/red wine/shallot jus to go with them and had them with green veg & garlic mash. Very simple but really decent. :)
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Re: Duck breasts

Postby Amber » April 21st, 2018, 8:18 pm

Err maybe not a politically correct answer, but if you didn’t tell him would he know it wasn’t pork? Sorry, I hope I’m not offending anyone, but dementia causes so many issues, sometimes a little white lie is acceptable.
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Re: Duck breasts

Postby Ratatouille » April 22nd, 2018, 1:43 pm

Amber that is just what I was wondering ;)
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Re: Duck breasts

Postby scullion » April 22nd, 2018, 2:15 pm

hmm, that could smack at a human rights issue!
as a vegetarian i have been subjected to that sort of thing before. it's insulting and pees me off.
if it's a taste thing surely he would know if it was pig or duck? if it's an ethical thing surely his beliefs should be accepted?
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Re: Duck breasts

Postby Ratatouille » April 22nd, 2018, 2:22 pm

But he isn't a vegetarian is he? I know plenty of people, Mr R included, who are perfectly aware that they are eating meat, or poultry but honestly wouldn't be able to name the actual beastie.

Actually if he does accept it, however, and it gives provides him with good quality, enjoyable, nutrition which is important for dementia sufferers, then I honestly can't see anything unethical.
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Re: Duck breasts

Postby suffolk » April 22nd, 2018, 2:28 pm

Human rights and dementia can be a very complex issue.
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Re: Duck breasts

Postby scullion » April 22nd, 2018, 2:31 pm

i realise he's not vegetarian, i was talking about myself.
so it would be ok to feed pork to a muslim or jew if they had dementia? i'm pointing out that pp has said he only likes leftover pork in a stir fry.. so surely his wishes should be acted on and not dismissed as irrelevant.
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Re: Duck breasts

Postby Ratatouille » April 22nd, 2018, 3:44 pm

scullion wrote:i realise he's not vegetarian, i was talking about myself.
so it would be ok to feed pork to a muslim or jew if they had dementia? i'm pointing out that pp has said he only likes leftover pork in a stir fry.. so surely his wishes should be acted on and not dismissed as irrelevant.


I really don't want to pursue this further because of course no-one with a grain of sense and decency would try to feed forbidden meats to anyone or meat/fish to a vegetarian for that matter. Perhaps dear Mr P has only ever eaten left-over pork stir-fry before. If he likes this then using the same stir-fry ingredients pp has used before will probably enable him to enjoy it.

We are only trying to help pp get her elderly, Altzheimer sufferer husband to eat it's not a matter of human rights or anything else, it's up to her and of course him to decide. I don't know if you have kids but if so have you never tried to hide certain things, like vegetables, in their food to achieve a balanced diet? I plead utterly guilty with both kids and GCs :D
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Re: Duck breasts

Postby Seatallan » April 22nd, 2018, 4:03 pm

Ratatouille wrote:We are only trying to help pp get her elderly, Altzheimer sufferer husband to eat it's not a matter of human rights or anything else, it's up to her and of course him to decide. I don't know if you have kids but if so have you never tried to hide certain things, like vegetables, in their food to achieve a balanced diet? I plead utterly guilty with both kids and GCs :D


When my nephew was wee he went through a phase of refusing to eat any meat that wasn't roast chicken. So we just pretended everything was roast chicken (which worked a treat :) ). My father thought he hated garlic (filthy foreign muck) but actually, unbeknown to him, he consumed it fairly often and enjoyed it (mum didn't hate garlic :D ).

I agree- human rights and dementia is a complex issue but I can see both sides of this one. I'm sure PP will be more than capable of making an informed decision where appropriate.
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Re: Duck breasts

Postby Amber » April 22nd, 2018, 8:16 pm

My mum (with dementia) would only ever drink black coffee. One day a carer accidentally gave her a white tea. My mum thought it was a lovely cup of black coffee, she had no idea or understanding, that it wasn’t.
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Re: Duck breasts

Postby scullion » April 23rd, 2018, 12:40 am

Ratatouille wrote:I don't know if you have kids but if so have you never tried to hide certain things, like vegetables, in their food to achieve a balanced diet?


no, never had the need. my son didn't (and still doesn't) like mushrooms so i didn't make him eat those - and he ate his brussels sprouts raw, and my daughter didn't like spring onions in a salad - so she left them on the side of her plate. otherwise they ate everything put in front of them. spicy or not and with as varied, strange veg as i could find. they had a very healthy attitude to food from an early age.
they both cook from scratch - and are good at it.
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Re: Duck breasts

Postby Ratatouille » April 23rd, 2018, 8:22 am

It was exactly the same with my two Scully/ They both had a couple of dislikes and DD's hatred of beetroot remains.Everyone is allowed a couple of won't eats but I have a GS who developed food fads when he was about 3 and we did go to all sorts of subtefuge. It was mostly because of his ADHD - he just wouldn't sit down for long enought to eat and even eating on the run depended on what he was obsessed by at that moment.

Now he's a strapping 15 year old player rugbyand he is the one who really loves cooking and baking - Dinosaure trees anyone?
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Re: Duck breasts

Postby Meganthemog » April 23rd, 2018, 9:37 am

Every Sunday my mother would get a joint of meat - beef, pork or lamb - chicken was only for very special occasions. My father would have the joint on a plate to carve at the table - who wants beef? Those that said yes please got a couple of thin slices put on their plate. Who wants lamb - the joint was turned around and the lamb was carved. Pork the same again. We were all happy - and none the wiser. OK our palates were pretty immature as we were only children!
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Re: Duck breasts

Postby suffolk » April 23rd, 2018, 10:47 am

I know this is going off at a tangent but I hope you'll forgive me ...

When Ma's dementia worsened we had to take out a Deprivation of Liberty Order ( https://www.scie.org.uk/mca/dols/at-a-glance ) as she would try to escape from The Lovely Home, propelling herself in her wheelchair with her feet and banging against the front door and demanding angrily to be allowed to go home or sometimes she wanted to 'get back to Base' wherever that was ... when she was asked she didn't know and she couldn't take on board any explanations as to why she was at The Lovely Home .... sometimes she became quite stroppy and tried to push me out of the way ... we found that the best thing to do was to agree that we could take her back tomorrow when she'd done her packing, then take her mind off things by going for a push around the town ... she soon forgot that she wanted to 'go home' or wherever, and looking in the butchers and the greengrocers etc took her back to a time when she was in control of her own life and happy and she became content ... fortunately there was an easy circular walk around the town and back to The Lovely Home where there was a meal or a cup of tea and a slice of cake waiting for her and she could tell everyone where she'd been and what she'd seen. This became the routine for the carers when Ma demanded to go home and it made it possible for her to stay there.

I regarded her most important right at that stage in her life was to be content and safe and well looked after by people who tried to make her happy ... and I knew her well enough to know that had the boot been on the other foot that would've been her opinion too. I was aware of decisions she'd made for her mother and for an elderly person she'd had responsibility for in the village years ago.

Sometimes keeping someone happy is the most important thing. If we hadn't promised she could leave "tomorrow" she'd have become so distressed that she'd have had to be sedated or go into a specialist 'locked' Alzheimer Unit ... an unfamiliar place and unfamiliar people and routines ... she'd have been terrified.
As it was she stayed in a place she knew with people she knew and who cared for her.

In most circumstances carers in a care home are not allowed to administer medicines 'by subterfuge' ... it is a person's right to know what they're taking and to be able to refuse the treatment if they choose to do so.

Were we right to allow a bit of bribery or subterfuge with fudge in order that Ma took the medication that helped her retain a little bit of clarity from time to time? I think we were. I know she would have agreed with me.

As I said, Human Rights and dementia is complex.
“One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.”
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Re: Duck breasts

Postby Gruney » April 23rd, 2018, 11:30 am

suffolk wrote:Were we right to allow a bit of bribery or subterfuge with fudge in order that Ma took the medication that helped her retain a little bit of clarity from time to time? I think we were.


Unhesitatingly. yes.
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Re: Duck breasts

Postby Amber » April 23rd, 2018, 10:48 pm

(Forgive me, I have partaken of alcohol.. ;) )

But isn’t there something on the Alzheimer’s site/Talking Point where they talk about ‘lovely’ white lies? Morally wrong maybe, but when you have to cope with someone ‘living’ with’AD/VD’, then your views may be altered.
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Re: Duck breasts

Postby PatsyMFagan » April 26th, 2018, 10:10 am

Meganthemog wrote:Every Sunday my mother would get a joint of meat - beef, pork or lamb - chicken was only for very special occasions. My father would have the joint on a plate to carve at the table - who wants beef? Those that said yes please got a couple of thin slices put on their plate. Who wants lamb - the joint was turned around and the lamb was carved. Pork the same again. We were all happy - and none the wiser. OK our palates were pretty immature as we were only children!


In a similar vein - I couldn't bear the thought of eating roast pork as a child, although I loved bacon. This might have had something to do with the fact that my dad raised pigs and so we saw the animal from birth to death. When I became a grown-up, roast pork still made me shudder :scared: . One Sunday my ex and I were invited to his brother's for lunch... the meat was already carved and I was told it was turkey. After clearing my plate, I commented how delicious the turkey was, to be told that it was in fact pork ;) I have loved pork ever since :tu: :hungry: :chops:
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Re: Duck breasts

Postby Amber » April 26th, 2018, 9:08 pm

Ah yes. We had to sign the ‘Dols’ papers too. Every year. It was so very, very sad, and very, very upsetting :( .
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Re: Duck breasts

Postby suffolk » April 26th, 2018, 10:05 pm

Amber :hug:
“One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.”
― Virginia Woolf
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