Jugged Hare

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Jugged Hare

Postby Pepper Pig » September 27th, 2017, 5:22 pm

A musician friend and I were reminiscing today about food we were given when we were staying with friends of sponsors during our early careers. Most were fairly forgettable but I remembered once being given lunch at a very swish house in St Albans and on the menu was Jugged Hare. :o :o Fortunately for me at that time there was an alternative of roast lamb.

I have still never tried Jugged Hare. (And I love how predictive text insists it is Hugged Hare). :lol: :lol: :lol:
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Re: Jugged Hare

Postby suffolk » September 27th, 2017, 5:43 pm

I love Jugged Hare ... we had it several times a season when I was a child, and certainly when I lived out in really rural Suffolk and the children were at home I cooked it at least once a winter, if not more. However, I may well not cook it again ... bro says he loves hares so much he will not shoot them ever again and will not allow them to be shot on his farm .:.. since he made that decision the numbers he sees are increasing year on year ... one hare doe rears her family in the meadow in front of his house every year :D

Needless to say, despite the deliciousness of Jugged Hare, I heartily approve of my brother's decision. :tu:
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Re: Jugged Hare

Postby Catherine » September 27th, 2017, 6:14 pm

I've had jugged kippers several times and like them, but hare is too similar to rabbit and my head says 'NO, no no no!!! Rabbits are pets' I have no doubt at all that rabbit and hare are indeed delicious, but I just can't get my head round it
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Re: Jugged Hare

Postby hickybank » September 27th, 2017, 7:56 pm

My local has Rabbit pie on the menu, it is all I have ever ordered in the last 20 years, it is gorgeous, it used to come with shot still in it but now it is reared Rabbit, but still delicious
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Re: Jugged Hare

Postby earthmaiden » September 27th, 2017, 7:59 pm

If it was procured legitimately I would like to taste Jugged Hare, it certainly used to be something eaten in the country quite a lot but as Suffs says, times change for all kinds of reasons and the hare population has declined greatly in recent times and so should be left alone.

I try not to think of any meat as a pet and like rabbit. Like most townies, I would find it harder to eat if the animal had been one I had nurtured. Is there any similarity between hare and rabbit? I don't even know if they are related although they look similar. I am led to believe it is a gamey kind of taste ... can those in the know confirm this?
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Re: Jugged Hare

Postby Pepper Pig » September 27th, 2017, 8:24 pm

Catherine wrote:I've had jugged kippers several times and like them, but hare is too similar to rabbit and my head says 'NO, no no no!!! Rabbits are pets' I have no doubt at all that rabbit and hare are indeed delicious, but I just can't get my head round it



I don't think jugging kippers and jugging hares is the same process is it? Kippers are done in minutes, hares take hours.
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Re: Jugged Hare

Postby suffolk » September 28th, 2017, 6:37 am

Hares and rabbits are related but in some ways are very different. Of course hares are native to Great Britain and play an important part in our myths and folklore, whereas rabbits were introduced (by Romans and/or Normans) as a meat animal.

As for the meat and flavour, rabbit is a mild-flavoured white meat similar to chicken
whereas hare is a rich dark meat and when properly cooked is best described as similar to venison but with the soft texture of slow-cooked shin of beef ... absolutely wonderful with a port and red currant jelly and herby forcemeat balls. :drool:
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Re: Jugged Hare

Postby Badger's mate » September 28th, 2017, 8:35 am

I usually cook one hare per winter, late in the year. Generally slow-cooked, which now means done slowly in the IP. Didn't do one last winter but had some lightly cooked loin in a local restaurant. Delicious and revelatory.

We usually use it as an excuse to get some dear friends over and open a very nice bottle of red. I am aware of the conservation and welfare issues but the local population is pretty strong. We do a BTO survey and see loads of them locally.

We eat a lot of game in the winter, perhaps more rabbit and pheasant than chicken, certainly more venison than beef. I've never thought of rabbits and hares as any more cute than little lambs, calves or piglets. Everyone's diet (at least in the developed world) involves animal slaughter on an industrial scale, even if they don't subsequently eat them.
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Re: Jugged Hare

Postby suffolk » September 28th, 2017, 9:33 am

I remember a story told by a dear friend about the time we met ... he and a friend (fresh from art school) had arrived in an isolated Suffolk village planning to stay in a derelict cottage belonging to a member of his family and renovate it for them ... on arriving at the cottage they found no electricity, no running water and little of anything else of importance (like a loo or a watertight roof :lol:). They also had no building skills to speak of but as 'trained sculptors' had imagined that they could do whatever was needed.

The night before they set out for Suffolk these lads had been beaten up by some skinheads and arrived in our quiet village, two blond cherubs with black eyes, split lips and various cuts and bruises ... my then husband who had his own building business took them under his wing and brought them home from the pub with him one night, introduced them and arranged to mentor their building work ... I told them that they could bring us a load of washing and have a family meal with us once a week. (I was a 'full-time housewife' so it wasn't onerous for me and they were nice lads).

We invited them to supper the following evening and as luck would have it we were having jugged hare.

Steve often says that he thought they'd died and gone to heaven :lol:
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Re: Jugged Hare

Postby Catherine » September 28th, 2017, 4:39 pm

What a lovely story Suffolk (well apart from the beaten up bit)
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Re: Jugged Hare

Postby suffolk » September 28th, 2017, 6:07 pm

It got even better Catherine ... the owners of the cottage were Steve's older brother and his wife S ... when they and their little one moved in to the renovated cottage S became my absolute bestest friend ... that was nearly 40 years ago :D :D :D

She says that the first time she, a real townie, came to visit me she me couldn't believe what she saw when she walked around the corner ... a skinny lass with a mane of Pre-Raphaelite curls swinging a woodaxe over her head chopping fire-logs :lol: :tutu:
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Re: Jugged Hare

Postby earthmaiden » September 28th, 2017, 8:38 pm

It sounds lovely Suffs! Wild rabbit can be a bit darker ... but not like that.
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Re: Jugged Hare

Postby suffolk » September 29th, 2017, 5:41 am

As a farmers daughter, the rabbit I grew up eating was always wild. Or as Pa would say, 'was it wild? It was furious' :lol:
But of course, the chicken we ate were always home reared free range too :D
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Re: Jugged Hare

Postby Badger's mate » September 29th, 2017, 8:45 am

I never see tame bunnies in the butchers around here. Dad and I used to have (tame) rabbit and pork strips as a Sunday dinner (in rotation with all the other options) about half a dozen times a year. Since I moved out, it's been much easier to get furious bunnies ( in this house it's always 'Wild? it was livid') but don't see a tame one.
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Re: Jugged Hare

Postby suffolk » September 30th, 2017, 10:03 am

Just went up to the farm shop and along with the pheasants the game dealer has delivered a couple of wild rabbits ... we're away for the weekend and our freezer doesn't have a cubic centimeter of free space, so the farm shop has put one in their freezer for me to collect next week ... :bounce:
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Re: Jugged Hare

Postby Badger's mate » September 30th, 2017, 12:08 pm

I've just discovered a long-lost bunny at the bottom of our freezer :D
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Re: Jugged Hare

Postby PatsyMFagan » October 1st, 2017, 8:42 am

I was sure I had one of those in the depths of my freezer too, but I reckon he must have burrowed his way out. I can't remember ever cooking it ;) :?: :? :rolleyes:
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Re: Jugged Hare

Postby Badger's mate » October 1st, 2017, 10:33 am

PatsyMFagan wrote:I was sure I had one of those in the depths of my freezer too, but I reckon he must have burrowed his way out. I can't remember ever cooking it ;) :?: :? :rolleyes:



I knew I had one; cooked it a month or so ago in a rabbit version of chicken Basque (I suppose Bunny Basque would be fitting given recent events). Anyway, I had the freezer contents out to remove a couple of bags of damsons. We had picked some in Norfolk the other week and I knew I had some more frozen, which I wanted to use up for jam. In the course of sorting this out I found second rabbit. Given the nature of bunnies, maybe if there were two there might be loads more, but perhaps that doesn't apply to frozen ones. :D

The question is, what to do with bonus bunny? SIL gave me a copy of Tessa Kiros' latest for my birthday. There 's a suitable recipe within, but I'm always open to helpful suggestions ;)
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Re: Jugged Hare

Postby Seatallan » October 1st, 2017, 10:50 am

I can never see past rabbit pie BM. I like the Delia 'Old English' recipe. :chops: :chops: :chops:

Love jugged hare. Only made it once but would be game (no pun intended) to give it another bash.
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Re: Jugged Hare

Postby Badger's mate » October 1st, 2017, 1:16 pm

I can never see past rabbit pie BM. I like the Delia 'Old English' recipe


We had a pub in a local village that did a great rabbit pie, so I never bothered. It was a proper pie (short crust top and bottom) done in a 'school dinner' metal tray. You'd get either a corner piece or a side piece.

However, the landlords have moved on. After a couple of adventures, we've now got a menu that's rather Greek inspired. I'd love to report that they've got rabbit stifado (there's a thought) but haven't been back yet.

In the summer, tandoori rabbit or rabbit satay are lovely on the barbeque.
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Re: Jugged Hare

Postby StokeySue » October 2nd, 2017, 3:10 pm

I dislike tame rabbit, like cotton wool rather than chicken IMHO and I'm not crazy about wildrabbit, though I've cooked nice meals from it a few times

I only cooked hare once, about forty years ago, I made a civet which is not very different from jugged I think, nice
I've eaten it a few times in restaurants

PP, I'd have jumped at the chance of tasting it when young
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Re: Jugged Hare

Postby suffolk » October 3rd, 2017, 5:56 pm

Seatallan wrote:I can never see past rabbit pie BM. I like the Delia 'Old English' recipe.


I make my rabbit pie filling using salt pork belly, cider, cream and leeks ... a bit like HFW's rabbit stew
recipe here https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyl ... odanddrink ... I bought some belly pork strips today and will be salting them ready to make our pie at the end of the week :chops:
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