For your Christmas Cheeseboard

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For your Christmas Cheeseboard

Postby earthmaiden » November 13th, 2017, 10:22 am

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Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

Postby suffolk » November 13th, 2017, 10:26 am

Can't discuss ... words have failed me (and that doesn't happen often)
:sprout: :sprout: :sprout:

Can we not reinstate corporal :whip2: punishment for crimes against food???????????? :twisted:
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Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

Postby liketocook » November 13th, 2017, 10:39 am

:sprout: :sprout: :sprout: I'll pass thank you
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Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

Postby scullion » November 13th, 2017, 11:44 am

i would try it.
i like red windsor, sage derby and stilton, etc, all cheese with additives - so maybe it it has something.
cheese and apple, and cheese and wine are well known combinations - maybe cheese, raspberries and prosecco could work. i think the girly pink wax should be swapped for a less garish colour, though.
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Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

Postby Ratatouille » November 13th, 2017, 12:49 pm

As the article say "and itreally tastes of Prosecco , not cheese" It might do for a friend who is a prosecco lover but never eats cheese.

I think the Wensleydale cheese people should be shot at dawn - and I used to do a bit of publicity for them :evil:
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Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

Postby scullion » November 13th, 2017, 12:58 pm

hmm - would pork purists have said the same thing about chorizo when it was first produced?
surely you shouldn't knock it until you've tried it?
it may be like eating a less sweet raspberry cheesecake - and what's to dislike about that‽
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Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

Postby earthmaiden » November 13th, 2017, 1:13 pm

I agree Scully. OK, it's not purist cheese (which of course I love), but it might still taste quite nice - and the pink is fun.

I don't really object to some of the more gimmicky cheeses which contain fruit etc. though I wouldn't expect to see them on a top class cheeseboard. I would want to try this before making a full judgement. The taste and texture would interest me and most of us have a secret penchant for 'common' foods as well as the good stuff :lol: .
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Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

Postby suffolk » November 13th, 2017, 1:26 pm

You've not convinced me ... Prosecco and cheese is one thing ... Prosecco in cheese is quite another and really doesn't appeal ... but then I'm not a fan of the white Stilton and apricot mashed together - type concoction either.
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Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

Postby Ratatouille » November 13th, 2017, 1:37 pm

suffolk wrote:You've not convinced me ... Prosecco and cheese is one thing ... Prosecco in cheese is quite another and really doesn't appeal ... but then I'm not a fan of the white Stilton and apricot mashed together - type concoction either.


Me neither Suffa, especially when done to perfectly good cheese in it's own right. A piece of white stilton with a slice of fruit cake is one thing and piece containing fruit cake is a horse of a different colour.

The only such thing that has got me vaguely interested was some Basque sheep's cheese - which is fairly nondescript - with piment d'Espalette, both of which are regionally appropriate.
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Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

Postby Badger's mate » November 13th, 2017, 1:43 pm

Like Scully, whilst reading this, 'Red Windsor' came straight to mind.

Is the concept really any different from that or Ubriaco or that wonderful Italian blue ewe's cheese soaked in dessert wine Basajo?
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Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

Postby suffolk » November 13th, 2017, 1:57 pm

But the Italian cheese is aged in the Basajo :chops: ... not mashed up and stirred into it and reformed in a mould ... you've still not convinced me :lol:
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Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

Postby liketocook » November 13th, 2017, 2:26 pm

I don't like Prosecco........ (or Champagne or basically any sparkling wine)
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Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

Postby scullion » November 13th, 2017, 3:27 pm

well, if i find some on sale i might just take the bullet for you and let you know if it's worth the discussion!
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Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

Postby TeresaFoodie » November 13th, 2017, 5:06 pm

I look forward to somebody reporting back if they find it on sale and try it. I might be tempted to a taster on a deli if offered.

I did feel like Harry Hill when I thought 'Now, I like cheese, I like prosecco, but which is best.....fight!'

I do think some things should be enjoyed individually but this could be a revelation, even though it looks very weird!
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Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

Postby Suelle » November 13th, 2017, 5:13 pm

Although I'm against adulterating cheese with extra flavours such as 'sticky toffee pudding' and chutneys etc, I do have a sneaky affection for Wensleydale with added fruit or pieces of ginger, as long as it's eaten with something like a digestive biscuit, and treated as a dessert. I couldn't eat it as part of a cheese course.
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Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

Postby suffolk » November 13th, 2017, 5:19 pm

scullion wrote:well, if i find some on sale i might just take the bullet for you and let you know if it's worth the discussion!


You're very welcome to my share Scully :D
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Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

Postby Zosherooney » November 13th, 2017, 5:33 pm

I don't think Red and Pink go together at all......

I've mentioned this B4 but found creme de menthe and stilton (cheese) in M'sons one year, I did try a bit in the shop, poor old tastebuds were very confused......
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Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

Postby Catherine » November 13th, 2017, 5:39 pm

I read about this in the papers. My immediate thoughts were........what a waste of prosecco and what a waste of cheese. I have a saying 'Not Worth the Calories' (NWTC) Very much the case here. I can't stand gimmicky flavoured cheese. Just leave it alone, a good stilton does not need toffee or apricots or dates or anything else in it. Cheddar does not need pickled onion in it or cranberries.
Last edited by Catherine on November 13th, 2017, 6:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

Postby Seatallan » November 13th, 2017, 5:49 pm

Hear, hear. What did the cheese ever do to deserve that? It's like Hot Cross Buns with fudge or chocolate chips or whatever. Just so wrong.
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Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

Postby earthmaiden » November 13th, 2017, 5:53 pm

Zosherooney wrote:I've mentioned this B4 but found creme de menthe and stilton (cheese) in M'sons one year,

Now that does sound a step too far! :sprout: :sprout:
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Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

Postby Luca » November 13th, 2017, 6:18 pm

That sounds vile Zosh. I don't think I'd even try it. I would try the prosecco cheese but it doesn't appeal.... and visually it's a nightmare on the eyes.
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Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

Postby Badger's mate » November 13th, 2017, 10:47 pm

So what's the feeling about cheeses like Sage Derby? I don't particularly like the bright green version, but IMO the ones flecked with dried sage are lovely.

I also like cheeses such as Y-Fenni, with mustard seeds and various other ones flavoured with different herbs and spices.

I've mentioned elsewhere that I also like Moliterno, which is Pecorino with a generous veining of truffle.

Whilst I can understand people trying something and not liking it, of course, and to an extent having reservations about particular flavour combinations, I must admit bafflement at an objection to the very concept of a cheese with things in it. Of course a good cheese doesn't need anything added to it, any more than a nice chicken needs to be cooked in wine, but that doesn't mean chicken cooked in wine isn't nice.
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Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

Postby suffolk » November 14th, 2017, 8:20 am

I don't object to the concept of cheese with things in it - if it works - I've tried the white Stilton and apricots and am not keen although OH loves it. I don't like the ones with Christmas cake in them although I love a piece of Lincolnshire Poacher with a slice of fruitcake. I used to get a lovely Sage Derby with green marbling ... Haven't seen it around for a while but it was very good.
I just think that pink Prosecco Wensleydale sounds unpleasant. I know enough of the flavours of both to be able to imagine it and the idea doesn't appeal to me.
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Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

Postby StokeySue » November 14th, 2017, 9:53 am

Fiona Beckett doesn't recommnd cheese with Prosecco
https://www.matchingfoodandwine.com/news/pairings/what-sort-of-food-to-pair-with-prosecco/

I have yet to find a cheese that is improved by addition of foreign substances, I used to quite like Boursin but am increasingly put off by the dryness of the dried herbs (the Tartare brand was better but seems to have disappeared)
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Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

Postby Badger's mate » November 14th, 2017, 9:53 am

I am to an extent playing Devil's advocate because I don't suppose I'd rush to buy raspberry prosecco flavoured cheese, but would try it if it were on a cheeseboard, at a buffet or being offered as free samples on a counter. I don't dislike cheeses with fruit or fruit cake in them, Mrs B is keener though I prefer herbed or spiced cheeses. There's a local outfit, Drummonds, that sell all manner of flavoured cheeses at local shows. The one with lime pickle in it is surprisingly good, but they do lots of flavours.
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Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

Postby Badger's mate » November 14th, 2017, 10:00 am

Stilton, Wensleydale and Cheshire are definitely improved by the addition of mouldy blue veins IMO :D
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Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

Postby Ratatouille » November 14th, 2017, 10:14 am

I have no objection to cheese with "things" but I like those things to have some connection with the cheese itself.

Suffs you made me remember Sage Derby which was good. I used to like the Northumbrian cheese with nettle both these things are linked to the places where the cows grazed. It's similar to the way goats cheese here is often wrapped in leaves, usually chestnut, soaked on marc.

As Sue says though Prosecco, pleasant though it is has absolutely no connection with cheese, especially one made in Yorkshire!
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Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

Postby StokeySue » November 14th, 2017, 10:15 am

Don't regard those as "foreign substances" BM ;)
Part of the cheese making / aging process
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