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For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: November 13th, 2017, 10:22 am
by earthmaiden

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: November 13th, 2017, 10:26 am
by suffolk
Can't discuss ... words have failed me (and that doesn't happen often)
:sprout: :sprout: :sprout:

Can we not reinstate corporal :whip2: punishment for crimes against food???????????? :twisted:

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: November 13th, 2017, 10:39 am
by liketocook
:sprout: :sprout: :sprout: I'll pass thank you

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: November 13th, 2017, 11:44 am
by scullion
i would try it.
i like red windsor, sage derby and stilton, etc, all cheese with additives - so maybe it it has something.
cheese and apple, and cheese and wine are well known combinations - maybe cheese, raspberries and prosecco could work. i think the girly pink wax should be swapped for a less garish colour, though.

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: November 13th, 2017, 12:49 pm
by Ratatouille
As the article say "and itreally tastes of Prosecco , not cheese" It might do for a friend who is a prosecco lover but never eats cheese.

I think the Wensleydale cheese people should be shot at dawn - and I used to do a bit of publicity for them :evil:

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: November 13th, 2017, 12:58 pm
by scullion
hmm - would pork purists have said the same thing about chorizo when it was first produced?
surely you shouldn't knock it until you've tried it?
it may be like eating a less sweet raspberry cheesecake - and what's to dislike about that‽

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: November 13th, 2017, 1:13 pm
by earthmaiden
I agree Scully. OK, it's not purist cheese (which of course I love), but it might still taste quite nice - and the pink is fun.

I don't really object to some of the more gimmicky cheeses which contain fruit etc. though I wouldn't expect to see them on a top class cheeseboard. I would want to try this before making a full judgement. The taste and texture would interest me and most of us have a secret penchant for 'common' foods as well as the good stuff :lol: .

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: November 13th, 2017, 1:26 pm
by suffolk
You've not convinced me ... Prosecco and cheese is one thing ... Prosecco in cheese is quite another and really doesn't appeal ... but then I'm not a fan of the white Stilton and apricot mashed together - type concoction either.

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: November 13th, 2017, 1:37 pm
by Ratatouille
suffolk wrote:You've not convinced me ... Prosecco and cheese is one thing ... Prosecco in cheese is quite another and really doesn't appeal ... but then I'm not a fan of the white Stilton and apricot mashed together - type concoction either.


Me neither Suffa, especially when done to perfectly good cheese in it's own right. A piece of white stilton with a slice of fruit cake is one thing and piece containing fruit cake is a horse of a different colour.

The only such thing that has got me vaguely interested was some Basque sheep's cheese - which is fairly nondescript - with piment d'Espalette, both of which are regionally appropriate.

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: November 13th, 2017, 1:43 pm
by Badger's mate
Like Scully, whilst reading this, 'Red Windsor' came straight to mind.

Is the concept really any different from that or Ubriaco or that wonderful Italian blue ewe's cheese soaked in dessert wine Basajo?

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: November 13th, 2017, 1:57 pm
by suffolk
But the Italian cheese is aged in the Basajo :chops: ... not mashed up and stirred into it and reformed in a mould ... you've still not convinced me :lol:

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: November 13th, 2017, 2:26 pm
by liketocook
I don't like Prosecco........ (or Champagne or basically any sparkling wine)

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: November 13th, 2017, 3:27 pm
by scullion
well, if i find some on sale i might just take the bullet for you and let you know if it's worth the discussion!

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: November 13th, 2017, 5:06 pm
by TeresaFoodie
I look forward to somebody reporting back if they find it on sale and try it. I might be tempted to a taster on a deli if offered.

I did feel like Harry Hill when I thought 'Now, I like cheese, I like prosecco, but which is best.....fight!'

I do think some things should be enjoyed individually but this could be a revelation, even though it looks very weird!

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: November 13th, 2017, 5:13 pm
by Suelle
Although I'm against adulterating cheese with extra flavours such as 'sticky toffee pudding' and chutneys etc, I do have a sneaky affection for Wensleydale with added fruit or pieces of ginger, as long as it's eaten with something like a digestive biscuit, and treated as a dessert. I couldn't eat it as part of a cheese course.

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: November 13th, 2017, 5:19 pm
by suffolk
scullion wrote:well, if i find some on sale i might just take the bullet for you and let you know if it's worth the discussion!


You're very welcome to my share Scully :D

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: November 13th, 2017, 5:33 pm
by Zosherooney
I don't think Red and Pink go together at all......

I've mentioned this B4 but found creme de menthe and stilton (cheese) in M'sons one year, I did try a bit in the shop, poor old tastebuds were very confused......

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: November 13th, 2017, 5:39 pm
by Catherine
I read about this in the papers. My immediate thoughts were........what a waste of prosecco and what a waste of cheese. I have a saying 'Not Worth the Calories' (NWTC) Very much the case here. I can't stand gimmicky flavoured cheese. Just leave it alone, a good stilton does not need toffee or apricots or dates or anything else in it. Cheddar does not need pickled onion in it or cranberries.

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: November 13th, 2017, 5:49 pm
by Seatallan
Hear, hear. What did the cheese ever do to deserve that? It's like Hot Cross Buns with fudge or chocolate chips or whatever. Just so wrong.

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: November 13th, 2017, 5:53 pm
by earthmaiden
Zosherooney wrote:I've mentioned this B4 but found creme de menthe and stilton (cheese) in M'sons one year,

Now that does sound a step too far! :sprout: :sprout:

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: November 13th, 2017, 6:18 pm
by Luca
That sounds vile Zosh. I don't think I'd even try it. I would try the prosecco cheese but it doesn't appeal.... and visually it's a nightmare on the eyes.

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: November 13th, 2017, 10:47 pm
by Badger's mate
So what's the feeling about cheeses like Sage Derby? I don't particularly like the bright green version, but IMO the ones flecked with dried sage are lovely.

I also like cheeses such as Y-Fenni, with mustard seeds and various other ones flavoured with different herbs and spices.

I've mentioned elsewhere that I also like Moliterno, which is Pecorino with a generous veining of truffle.

Whilst I can understand people trying something and not liking it, of course, and to an extent having reservations about particular flavour combinations, I must admit bafflement at an objection to the very concept of a cheese with things in it. Of course a good cheese doesn't need anything added to it, any more than a nice chicken needs to be cooked in wine, but that doesn't mean chicken cooked in wine isn't nice.

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: November 14th, 2017, 8:20 am
by suffolk
I don't object to the concept of cheese with things in it - if it works - I've tried the white Stilton and apricots and am not keen although OH loves it. I don't like the ones with Christmas cake in them although I love a piece of Lincolnshire Poacher with a slice of fruitcake. I used to get a lovely Sage Derby with green marbling ... Haven't seen it around for a while but it was very good.
I just think that pink Prosecco Wensleydale sounds unpleasant. I know enough of the flavours of both to be able to imagine it and the idea doesn't appeal to me.

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: November 14th, 2017, 9:53 am
by StokeySue
Fiona Beckett doesn't recommnd cheese with Prosecco
https://www.matchingfoodandwine.com/news/pairings/what-sort-of-food-to-pair-with-prosecco/

I have yet to find a cheese that is improved by addition of foreign substances, I used to quite like Boursin but am increasingly put off by the dryness of the dried herbs (the Tartare brand was better but seems to have disappeared)

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: November 14th, 2017, 9:53 am
by Badger's mate
I am to an extent playing Devil's advocate because I don't suppose I'd rush to buy raspberry prosecco flavoured cheese, but would try it if it were on a cheeseboard, at a buffet or being offered as free samples on a counter. I don't dislike cheeses with fruit or fruit cake in them, Mrs B is keener though I prefer herbed or spiced cheeses. There's a local outfit, Drummonds, that sell all manner of flavoured cheeses at local shows. The one with lime pickle in it is surprisingly good, but they do lots of flavours.

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: November 14th, 2017, 10:00 am
by Badger's mate
Stilton, Wensleydale and Cheshire are definitely improved by the addition of mouldy blue veins IMO :D

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: November 14th, 2017, 10:14 am
by Ratatouille
I have no objection to cheese with "things" but I like those things to have some connection with the cheese itself.

Suffs you made me remember Sage Derby which was good. I used to like the Northumbrian cheese with nettle both these things are linked to the places where the cows grazed. It's similar to the way goats cheese here is often wrapped in leaves, usually chestnut, soaked on marc.

As Sue says though Prosecco, pleasant though it is has absolutely no connection with cheese, especially one made in Yorkshire!

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: November 14th, 2017, 10:15 am
by StokeySue
Don't regard those as "foreign substances" BM ;)
Part of the cheese making / aging process

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: December 11th, 2017, 6:31 pm
by Zosherooney
Visited the Bath branch http://www.paxtonandwhitfield.co.uk today, worth searching out if a tad expensive... I had to ask them to cut my piece in half otherwise it would have been £10 for a smallish piece of aged gouda. The most expensive cheese in the shop was a truffle cheese at £65 a kilo !!!! :scared:

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: December 11th, 2017, 7:00 pm
by aero280
I was given a birthday present last September of local cheeses from the P&W shop in Bath. They were very nice and the packaging was excellent - foam lined cardboard box with some frozen gel packs in with it.

But ifyou want to spend money on expensive cheese, Neal's Yard had the American Rogue River in again. It's £98.75/Kg... :shock: :shock: :shock:

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: December 12th, 2017, 7:28 am
by Zosherooney
I would not have associated Americans with cheese, when we lived there the cheese was rubbish, Mr. Z described it as savoury custard. Give me french cheeses and some English ones any time.

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: December 12th, 2017, 9:09 am
by Badger's mate
Having followed the P&W link, I see they sell the wonderful Moliterno, but at a rather higher price than the lovely people I get it from.

http://www.eatdrinkideas.co.uk/

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: December 12th, 2017, 9:46 am
by aero280
Zosherooney wrote:I would not have associated Americans with cheese, when we lived there the cheese was rubbish, Mr. Z described it as savoury custard. Give me french cheeses and some English ones any time.


Neal’s Yard sell two American cheeses from time to time.

The Rogue River is a mild blue cheese that is matured while wrapped in brandy soaked vine leaves.

The other is a hard cheese called Pleasant Ridge, I think.

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: December 12th, 2017, 2:56 pm
by Ratatouille
On Sunday i was given a tete de moin (monks head) by our Swiss friends. I already own a cutter so now i can make pretty flowers to my hearts content. they look good on canapes too. Really good Christmas cheese

http://www.cheesesfromswitzerland.com/c ... e-aop.html

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: December 14th, 2017, 1:09 pm
by nursemimi
We have some very good cheese

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: December 14th, 2017, 3:47 pm
by Herbidacious
I bought some Tête de Moine 'flowers' in Lille the other week (and ate them :) ), but we also have an instrument edit: a girolle! for shaving it. Bit pricey to buy even a half one, though, but maybe for Christmas... :hungry: I wonder if the Fromagerie on Lamb's Conduit street will sell me a half...

Someone at work arranged to buy lots of Lancashire bombs and a whole stilton to distribute at reduced price, so I have two of the former and far too much of the latter in my fridge. I've also got some comté, and some Cantal - I bought the latter to make aligot, but as usual it's already going off before I've got round to it, so it won't last until Christmas.

Cheese is going to be a post Christmas treat when we get back from my mother's I think.

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: January 3rd, 2018, 1:41 pm
by earthmaiden
The Raspberry Prosecco cheese (as per original post) is back in stock! I have ordered some out of curiosity :)

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: January 3rd, 2018, 3:11 pm
by karadekoolaid
Don't knock it if you haven't tried it. If you don't try it, you have no idea whether it's good or not. You can't judge TASTE by LOOKING - unless you're my nephew, of course, who will categorically state " I don't think I'm going to like that" before ever touching it :evil: :evil: On that basis (using one sense to make a decision for another 8-) ) No-one would ever eat Pont L'Evecque, " because it stinks too much".
Would I buy it? Well yes, I might, but I'd like to try it first. It might be tasty, it might be a disappointment (like Ilchester cheese or those cheeses filled with fruit). But give it a go!!

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: January 5th, 2018, 5:17 pm
by earthmaiden
The Raspberry and Prosecco cheese arrived this morning and I had a small piece at lunch. It tastes very much of raspberries and Prosecco with a cheesy background and texture. It is quite fruity (compared, say to Wensleydale with cranberries), more like a dessert than a cheese really - although very definitely a cheese - I have no idea what one would serve it with. I can't think of any biscuit or cracker I would like it with, a sliver on its own after a meal is quite nice, I think possibly just a few raspberries to eat with it or even slices of apple might work best.

I have looked online for serving suggestions but notice none of the reviews venture that far! I did notice mention of grilled cheese but am not sure about that, it might be fun to experiment with sweet breads and puff pastry. Not during the New Year diet though!

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: January 6th, 2018, 4:48 am
by karadekoolaid
well a MILLION kudos for trying it, earthmaiden. Well done!!
I'd just cut a slice of ordinary, common-or-garden bread from a loaf and give it a go.

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: January 6th, 2018, 7:48 am
by TeresaFoodie
Thanks for the feedback. I am dying to think of a serving suggestion but struggling! My mind is darting off in all directions. In a no bake cheesecake?

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: January 6th, 2018, 9:33 am
by StokeySue
earthmaiden, that sounds really unpleasant to me! I like cheese to taste of cheese, on the whole

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: January 6th, 2018, 9:55 am
by suffolk
I think there ought to be some sort of medal for Wildies who taste above and beyond the call of duty :sprout:

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: January 6th, 2018, 10:49 am
by earthmaiden
:lol: :lol: :lol: ... it really isn't that bad, just difficult to pair (IMO).

karadekoolaid wrote: I'd just cut a slice of ordinary, common-or-garden bread from a loaf and give it a go.

You know, that might just work - the white, crusty cotton wool kind of bread still warm from the oven :chops:

Tezza - I prefer a softer cheese in cheesecake - the flavour would be lovely but Wensleydale in a cheesecake not quite right.

I shall continue to enjoy small pieces on their own after meals I think!

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: January 11th, 2018, 1:36 pm
by earthmaiden
Crikey! Look what they've introduced now!!!!!

https://gbcheese.co.uk/triple-chocolate-indulgence.html

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: January 11th, 2018, 3:24 pm
by suffolk
That is just plain WRONG in so so many ways :shock: :sprout:

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: January 11th, 2018, 5:35 pm
by StokeySue
I don't even like proper chocolate cheesecake - cacao and lactic acid not natural partners IMHO

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: January 17th, 2018, 3:17 pm
by earthmaiden
The chocolate cheese has arrived. I feel that these things need trying before judging ;) .

I must say, it isn't bad. As with the raspberry, I have no idea what you would do with it apart from just eating it. As I live on my own I am happy to eat small amounts at the end of a meal but can't imagine how one would serve it to guests. The chocolate is quite sweet, has a less crumbly texture than the raspberry and is almost like a not too sweet truffle. I think you could make various puddings with it but it would be an expensive way to do so. It might go with semi-sweet biscuits or pastry too.

Both the raspberry and chocolate are an interesting gimmick and I feel sure will sell well initially just for that reason. Would I buy either regularly? I doubt it.

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: January 29th, 2018, 4:06 pm
by Zosherooney
Well this is New Year 2018 and we have scoured the cheese racks of France and I bought 2 x https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brillat-Savarin_cheese (by mistake) and I am so pleased I did, this is a gastonomic delight and I feel I have read the cheeses book for France back to back and I have not come across this one before. I am in cheese heaven and am having a delightful time with this one. I lurve Chaource with a vengeance but this Savarin is a level higher IMHO. Mmmmmmm!

Re: For your Christmas Cheeseboard

PostPosted: January 29th, 2018, 6:14 pm
by aero280
Costco have a cheese called "Beaufort". A French cheese that's new to me. I may but some soon, but they only sell it as 1 kg slices. I have a few cheeses to eat up before I can buy a kilo of any more cheese!! :o