Traditional puddings.

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Traditional puddings.

Postby Ratatouille » January 6th, 2018, 1:38 pm

I promised Mr R that I would make him a Sussex Pond Pudding tomorrow. I think this is one of our all time favourite trad pud. What are yours?
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby Busybee » January 6th, 2018, 2:28 pm

My husband would instantly say apple crumble, closely followed by any fruit crumble.

Traditional puddings.........I like jam roll poly, but prefer it baked to steamed. Spotted dick, sticky toffee pudding or any fruit plate pie.

Quite ordinary tastes really, certainly nothing too fancy.

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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby TeresaFoodie » January 6th, 2018, 2:42 pm

Sussex Pond is on my 'eat me' list!

One to have with custard would have to be jam roly poly. One to have with coffee would be bread pudding like my nan used to make. :chops:
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby KC2 » January 6th, 2018, 2:43 pm

Ours is definitely apple crumble - with demerara sugar, oats and assorted seeds in the crumble. But then I've never really got into steamed pudds so perhaps because it's the only one I make regularly :D
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby StokeySue » January 6th, 2018, 3:08 pm

Almost anything with custard
I really like treacle tart or baked rice pudding
Rhubarb is my favourite crumble
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby KC2 » January 6th, 2018, 3:29 pm

StokeySue wrote:Almost anything with custard


Do you like Bird's custard? Or only proper egg custard :D
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby suffolk » January 6th, 2018, 3:38 pm

We love bread & butter pudding made with brioche and marmalade ... OH's latest request is for a proper Bakewell Pudding ... I'll have to make one soon. :chef:
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby sueturnersmith » January 6th, 2018, 3:45 pm

I love bread and butter pudding made with cream, which I rarely make because it’s so calorific. OH’s favourite is apple pie and custard.
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby suffolk » January 6th, 2018, 3:46 pm

I think my favourite of all proper puds is Queen of Puddings :chops: :chops: :chops:
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby karadekoolaid » January 6th, 2018, 4:32 pm

Sorry to say that I dislike them all.
But that could be something to do with the climate!
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby TeresaFoodie » January 6th, 2018, 4:54 pm

My favourite crumble is rhubarb, hot with custard in winter, hot with ice cream in summer. Mixed with strawberries is good. I would eat any crumble though given the chance. :drool:
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby suffolk » January 6th, 2018, 5:08 pm

What about Apple Charlotte? :chops:
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby Suelle » January 6th, 2018, 5:18 pm

I wouldn't have counted crumbles as old-fashioned traditional puddings - but they're certainly one of my favourites.

I was trying to think which really old-fashioned pudding I'd like to have, if I were to make one, and decided that my mother's plain suet pudding which was served with dark brown sugar and raspberry vinegar would be what I'd most like to eat. 50 years ago raspberry vinegar wasn't the gourmet ingredient that it is now! I think treacle tart might be second on my list.
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby StokeySue » January 6th, 2018, 5:32 pm

KC2 wrote:
StokeySue wrote:Almost anything with custard


Do you like Bird's custard? Or only proper egg custard :D

Yes

All custard is good! Bird's, Ambrosia, supermarket fresh, home made creme. anglaise.... :hungry: :hungry:

Have you noticed that some stores (M&S you know who you are) tried to call their chilled custard "proper custard" but of couse it isn't as it comtains no egg at all and their knuckles were rapped

I like bread and butter pudding, but it has to be proper trad B&B; bread not brioche, definitely not croissants :sprout: :sprout: and no trace of jam, honey, or marmalade (sorry Suffolk but I really only like the basic version, well basic apart from cream!)

Queen of Puddings too though I've always been puzzled by Jane Grigson's assertion that it should be served with lashings of pouring cream - surely it's Queen of puddings because perfect as is?

My family liked apple amber (pie crust filled with stewed apple flavoured with lemon zest and mixed with egg yolk then. baked to just set the filling, then topped with meringue and the meringue browned). So much nicer than lemon meringue pie, and handy as equally good hot on day one and cold on day two :tu:
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby Herbidacious » January 6th, 2018, 7:46 pm

When I saw your thread header, SPP was the first thing that popped into my head. It's on my list of things to make.

I love sticky toffee pudding (not sure how traditional it is) and if I am having a pub lunch out at the weekend, find it hard to resist, and am not usually (although have sometimes been) disappointed. Other steamed puddings too. My mother used to make them fairly often on a SUnday.

I do like bread and butter pudding - especially cold the next day with single cream. Rice pudding, yes, but ideally a creamy one with some spices and even dried fruit in it.

Not keen on suet based ones (my mother used to make them) so no to jam roly-poly. DItto crumbles insofar that I am not keen on cooked fruit. So apple pie is anathema and blackberry and apple anything even worse.

I had to google Queen of puddings. I am looking dubious, but I'd try it if someone offered it to me!

Treacle tart Yum!

Gypsy tart? Probably not that traditional, but quite nice..
Leon meringue - I like the lemony aspect but less so there meringue.

What else is there?
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby suffolk » January 6th, 2018, 8:29 pm

Try Queen of Puddings ... It's marvellous :chef:
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby earthmaiden » January 6th, 2018, 10:38 pm

Definitely steamed suet puddings - like those we had at school or that MIL used to make :chops: :chops: . Spotted Dick, Treacle pudding and Jam roly poly are the tops .. with Birds custard. I love crumbles too - especially apricot. Oh, and treacle tart but not fancy ones with lots of lemon but the syrupy ones at school which contained breadcrumbs and cornflakes and for which I have never found a satisfactory recipe.

The other nice one is chocolate sponge with chocolate custard, a favourite from school which I have made many times since.
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby TeresaFoodie » January 7th, 2018, 12:21 am

What about Manchester tart? Never known by that name at school but I am sure it is usually known as that. Pastry filled with some kind of set custard, I think, jam, desiccated coconut. Served at school with claggy and semi cold strawberry custard. I would love to try a more refined version.
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby Herbidacious » January 7th, 2018, 9:48 am

I ordered Manchester tart in a restaurant last year (the same one that does Sussex Pond pudding for one) not realizing it involved desiccated coconut :cry: :evil: :sprout: (Soooo disappointed.) Apart from the coconut I am sure it would be nice. It was a sophisticated version. I'd not heard of it before this.
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby Pepper Pig » January 7th, 2018, 10:38 am

Am I the only person who can't abide hot custard? :oops: :oops:
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby suffolk » January 7th, 2018, 10:53 am

Pepper Pig wrote:Am I the only person who can't abide hot custard? :oops: :oops:


Quite possibly :lol:
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby Pepper Pig » January 7th, 2018, 11:10 am

Even the thought of it makes me gag, sorry. :oops:

We always had Spotty Dog with butter and sugar. Is still a favourite here although I only make it when I’m really spoiling myself. Pancakes for pudding was another of mum’s staples.
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby suffolk » January 7th, 2018, 12:10 pm

Pancakes were a rarity in our house when I was a child ... it wasn't often the Rayburn hob was hot enough to fry a pancake ... if the wind was in the right direction perhaps we might be lucky ... otherwise Pa would have to do some serious stoking for Shrove Tuesday :rolleyes:
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby scullion » January 7th, 2018, 12:11 pm

not really a cooked pudding house here, i'd rather have seconds of the savoury and my partner eats so much fruit i consider that he gets enough sugar.
the pineapple gadget gets used a couple of times a month, in the summer we'll have an ice cream from the freezer and in the autumn, the odd blackberry and apple crumble. i do like christmas pudding but as it didn't get eaten this year we may retrieve it from our son's (they don't like it), indulge some and freeze some.
when the kids were small i used to make treacle pudding - five minutes cooking in the microwave seemed like magic to little ones - like the seven minute (cooking time) chocolate cake.
oh yes, and pancakes on pancake day. i must dig out the crepe gadget!
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby StokeySue » January 7th, 2018, 2:04 pm

Pepper Pig wrote:Even the thought of it makes me gag, sorry. :oops:

We always had Spotty Dog with butter and sugar. Is still a favourite here although I only make it when I’m really spoiling myself. Pancakes for pudding was another of mum’s staples.

Now the very thought of steamed or boiled suet pud nakes me heave - but putting butter and sugar on it would finish me off :sprout: :sprout: :sprout:

I dont like any of the Christmas alternatives to custard and cream - rum or brandy butter, sweet white sauce with or without booze, all very unpleasant to my taste but clearly popular :?
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby Ratatouille » January 7th, 2018, 2:23 pm

Sussex pond duly made and half consumed with glasses raised to my dad who always said it was his favourite. In fact I don't think I have made it since he died13 years ago. Pleased to say it worked brilliantly and held together until cut. We never used to have custard with this because you have to appreciate the buttery lemon fudgy interior, but we did have a little pouring cream thereon.

I love custard, hot or cold, but it has to be either "proper" Birds made with evap milk (half and half with water) or real egg custard.

From my Bahama days I have fond memories of Guva duff which must be a throw back to naval ships recipe - like boiled baby etc. It is a suet crust filled with guava shells,brown sugar, butter and rum. Sorry if Slimming World memebrs are having heart attcks at this stage. I just happen to have a couple of tins of guava shells in the storeroom which has set me thinking. Maybe next moth!! :lol: :lol:
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby scullion » January 7th, 2018, 6:20 pm

StokeySue wrote:Now the very thought of steamed or boiled suet pud nakes me heave - but putting butter and sugar on it would finish me off

I dont like any of the Christmas alternatives to custard and cream - rum or brandy butter, sweet white sauce with or without booze, all very unpleasant to my taste but clearly popular


i agree, on both accounts (other than christmas pudding- if that's counted as a 'suet' pudding nowadays).
i had 'brandy butter' once - it was so sweet i could feel my teeth crumbling. awful stuff.
christmas pudding gets served with clotted cream here.
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby earthmaiden » January 7th, 2018, 7:31 pm

My ex MIL took up with a nice old gent some time after she was widowed. She made wonderful Christmas puds and he made wonderful brandy butter. I'd never had it before and didn't think I'd like it as a replacement for custard or cream ..... but my word, I did!! :chops: :chops: :chops:
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby PatsyMFagan » January 7th, 2018, 8:07 pm

StokeySue wrote:My family liked apple amber (pie crust filled with stewed apple flavoured with lemon zest and mixed with egg yolk then. baked to just set the filling, then topped with meringue and the meringue browned). So much nicer than lemon meringue pie, and handy as equally good hot on day one and cold on day two


Oooh, that's a blast from the past ;) lol: ... years ago, my favourite cookery book was a very basic one but in that was this recipe for apple amber ... :chops: :chef: :hungry:
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby Catherine » January 7th, 2018, 8:08 pm

sueturnersmith wrote:OH’s favourite is apple pie and custard


I'd say his favourite was sticky toffee pudding
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby TeresaFoodie » January 7th, 2018, 11:07 pm

Glad the Sussex pond turned out well! I can imagine custard would be too much to compete with it.

Just the thought of brandy butter or a sweet white sauce with Christmas pudding brings on what I can only describe as one of my sugar headaches! I have to have mine alone. Cold custard I love, especially the skin! :chops:
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby Ratatouille » January 8th, 2018, 9:57 am

Apple Amber is a favourite in this house too. I was always told by M-I-L that it was a Somerset recipe and , as a Northener I had never tasted it until I met Mr R. I make it here but , in season, I s-quinces. It is gorgeous.

There would be a divorce here if brandy butter was noy made at Christmas. I use unsalted butter, half the amount of sugar , soft light brown, and as much brandy as the butter will hold. The idea of either cream or custard with Xmas pud is too heretical to contemplate :lol:
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby StokeySue » January 8th, 2018, 10:26 am

I think our apple amber recipe cam from the cook book that came with the gas stove in the fifties, so not obviously regional. There are versions without the pastry shell too and I've seen a Victorian recipe quited somewhere
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby suffolk » January 8th, 2018, 12:22 pm

I have an Apple Amber recipe in a copy of Modern Cookery Illustrated which belonged to my Gt Aunt ... inscribed "'To Miss Mitchell From Mr Terry(?) Xmas 1946".
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby Ratatouille » January 8th, 2018, 1:25 pm

Thet make a pastryless version quite similar in Nomandy . In this case flavoured with calvados rather than marmalade.
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby Zosherooney » January 8th, 2018, 6:38 pm

My fave crumble is crispy all the way through, I am not fond of the sludgey bit where it stops being crispy and mixes with the fruit underneath. My Mum achieved this by the use of 'some' oats in the crumble mix. Charlotte (as I remember it) breadcrumbs with suet and sugar is a good mix for a topping too.
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby Suelle » January 8th, 2018, 6:55 pm

Zosherooney wrote:My fave crumble is crispy all the way through, I am not fond of the sludgey bit where it stops being crispy and mixes with the fruit underneath. My Mum achieved this by the use of 'some' oats in the crumble mix. Charlotte (as I remember it) breadcrumbs with suet and sugar is a good mix for a topping too.


You need Hugh F-W's 'fumble' recipe, Zosh. The crumble is cooked separately and just sprinkled over cooked fruit. Here it's mulberries, but any cooked fruit can be used.

https://www.rivercottage.net/recipes/mulberry-fumble
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby Seatallan » January 8th, 2018, 6:58 pm

Just yum.... :chops: :chops: Whole thread... :hungry: :hungry: :hungry: :D
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby Ratatouille » January 8th, 2018, 7:33 pm

Come over one evening ! We're always init for a pudding at this time of year :hungry: :hungry:
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby TeresaFoodie » January 8th, 2018, 7:53 pm

I like the idea of a fumble, although I really don't mind the idea of crumble mingling with the fruit. I quite like the soggy mixing with the crunchy.
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby Amber » January 8th, 2018, 10:04 pm

Ooh, Christmas pudding, fried in butter, served with brandy cream/butter. Delicious :D .
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby Zosherooney » January 9th, 2018, 11:04 pm

PP the thought of cold congealed custard makes me heave....... like cold gravy but sweet..... :sprout: I hate trifle with a vengeance. Amber my Mum used to do Xmas pud as you describe but we did not have the cream/butter but WARM custard !!!!
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby Prettykiwicrazy » January 10th, 2018, 6:33 pm

God I love puddings, pretty much any type . If it's a traditional English pudding , I think hot custard drowns out the flavour of the pudding . I prefer a dollop of cold custard or extra thick double cream. Good vanilla ice cream is nice with something like syrup sponge to cut through the sweetness
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby Ratatouille » January 10th, 2018, 7:55 pm

Zosh. I would happily invite you over here to taste my trifle. I don't count that as a pudding though - triflre is just that a dessert not a pudding, Pudding sticks to your ribs and comforts - trifle is a mere trifle :lol: :lol:
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby aero280 » January 10th, 2018, 11:48 pm

When I was at junior school we had lunch in a steamy basement. I don't know why, but the chocolate sponge pudding with chocolate "custard" would make me want to be sick as soon as I saw it being served... :o

I would b quite happy to eat it now, along with almost any other type of suet pudding with custard or treacle...
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby Zosherooney » January 11th, 2018, 7:51 am

Thanks Rats, I should have re-read 'traditional'... :?
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby Suelle » January 11th, 2018, 8:41 am

Zosherooney wrote:Thanks Rats, I should have re-read 'traditional'... :?


'Traditional' wasn't the problem - it's the equally thorny area of what is a pudding in the wider context of desserts. :lol:
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby earthmaiden » January 11th, 2018, 10:19 am

[quote="aero280"]When I was at junior school we had lunch in a steamy basement. I don't know why, but the chocolate sponge pudding with chocolate "custard" would make me want to be sick as soon as I saw it being served... :o [quote]

:lol: :lol: in my case it was prunes and custard! Not helped by once seeing a girl bring up her helping whilst we were changing our shoes to go outside after lunch :sprout:. It was only when I was grown up and discovered that they could be cooked without added sugar that I liked them more.

'
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby suffolk » January 11th, 2018, 11:27 am

Are you sure you weren't at my school EM ... I remember the 'returning prunes' incident very clearly :sprout:
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Re: Traditional puddings.

Postby earthmaiden » January 11th, 2018, 1:13 pm

:lol: :lol: :lol:
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