strange and interesting dishes!

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strange and interesting dishes!

Postby wargarden » May 15th, 2019, 6:24 am

here are are list strange and interesting
dishes i am planning on making soon.

consomme royal
chicken ala princess
queen fritters
bannock
berwick sponge cake
Chinese pearl balls
japanese neapolitan
Hachis Parmentier
Chaliapin Steak
Roast Pork, Just Kidding
Quail Stuffed with Risotto and Eggs
7 beef stew with wine
Cheese-Feathered Hanetsuki Gyōza

what strange or interesting dishes are you planning on making?
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Re: strange and interesting dishes!

Postby earthmaiden » May 15th, 2019, 8:19 am

The thing is, especially now we are a global community, that what seems strange or interesting to one person seems normal to another. It's not so long ago that spaghetti bolognese was viewed as strange here!
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Re: strange and interesting dishes!

Postby Ratatouille » May 15th, 2019, 9:16 am

I make hachis Parmentier all the time. It is known in this house as cottage pie if made with beef, shepherd's pie with lamb. M Parmentier was a pharmacist and nutritionalist and just before the French Revolution he realised that potatoes could help the starving peasants because they are easy to grow. In order to get them accepted by the aristocracy as well as the peasants he hyped them up and made them sought after by, among other things giving the flowers to the ladies of the court.

So anything topped with mashed potatoes is called Parmentier in France. One of the good things so prepared her is brandade Parmentier = creamed salt cod with garlic and olive oil topped with a mash also containing olive oil.

Queen fritters are called beignets in France and are a sort of doughnut but not made with yeast. Most bakers round here have their own version especially around Shrove Tuesday

My granny used to make Berwick sponge cake - we lived in NE England and spent many summers near Berwick. She also made Perwick tart and there are also Berwick cockles which on not sea food but striped mint sweets.
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Re: strange and interesting dishes!

Postby Suelle » May 15th, 2019, 10:35 am

You might get more positive reactions to your posts if you interacted on threads that you have already started.

For instance, what do you take on picnics, what is your favourite frosting recipe?
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Re: strange and interesting dishes!

Postby Seatallan » May 15th, 2019, 10:53 am

wargarden wrote:bannock


There are loads of variations on what constitutes a bannock depending on where you are from. I made some Shetland Bannocks a while back, in the hope of tempting the appetite of a poorly friend, and they were not unlike scones. On the other hand, some are more like flat-breads and some are closer to a fruit loaf.

Can't say I'm planning anything strange or interesting on the culinary front at present however.
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Re: strange and interesting dishes!

Postby patpoyntz » May 15th, 2019, 12:36 pm

The Selkirk bannocks I get are like a fruited tea cake with a marzipan centre. They are lush!
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Re: strange and interesting dishes!

Postby PatsyMFagan » May 15th, 2019, 12:55 pm

patpoyntz wrote:The Selkirk bannocks I get are like a fruited tea cake with a marzipan centre. They are lush!



:chops: :chops: :chops:
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Re: strange and interesting dishes!

Postby scullion » May 15th, 2019, 2:00 pm

just in case anyone really wanted to see (many of) the recipes mentioned above they are available here.
probably his/her favourite site.
maybe the originator of the thread is just using this as an online list of things they might want to try sometime.
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Re: strange and interesting dishes!

Postby suffolk » May 15th, 2019, 2:08 pm

I really don’t want to be unwelcoming to new members, especially those from other places and cultures ... but I’m beginning to feel a little uncomfortable about answering random questions posed by a stranger who does not interact with folk on this forum in any other way.

Am I the odd one out?
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Re: strange and interesting dishes!

Postby wargarden » May 15th, 2019, 2:13 pm

Suelle interact with threads I start.

scullion the reason i like that manga is it has a good story as wells as good recipes

the recipe I got for bannock is from 1890's Boston Globe so it is probable and older version.
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Re: strange and interesting dishes!

Postby scullion » May 15th, 2019, 2:21 pm

not at all. i find the method of posting and lack of interaction exasperating. maybe it's a test to see how long it takes for people to ignore them!
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Re: strange and interesting dishes!

Postby earthmaiden » May 15th, 2019, 2:28 pm

It doesn't really bother me, some of it sparks interesting conversation and you don't have to respond if you don't want to.
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Re: strange and interesting dishes!

Postby scullion » May 15th, 2019, 2:29 pm

i wish was a nicer person!
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Re: strange and interesting dishes!

Postby Amber » May 15th, 2019, 10:02 pm

Ratatouille wrote:I make hachis Parmentier all the time. It is known in this house as cottage pie if made with beef, shepherd's pie with lamb. M Parmentier was a pharmacist and nutritionalist and just before the French Revolution he realised that potatoes could help the starving peasants because they are easy to grow. In order to get them accepted by the aristocracy as well as the peasants he hyped them up and made them sought after by, among other things giving the flowers to the ladies of the court.

So anything topped with mashed potatoes is called Parmentier in France. .


Very interesting, I always thought ‘Parmentier’ was similar to this, ie cubed pots
https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/128 ... r-potatoes

I’m happy to eat them, whatever! :D :D

(I may be wrong, I have had a glass or two :oops: ;))
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Re: strange and interesting dishes!

Postby patpoyntz » May 15th, 2019, 10:11 pm

Rick Stein made a chicken parmentier in one of his ‘long weekends’ programmes, I think from Bordeaux. I thought it looked very nice, but I have never got round to making it.
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Re: strange and interesting dishes!

Postby suffolk » May 16th, 2019, 4:54 am

Wargarden ... could you post your recipe for bannocks please? As they’re such an old dish, recipes are very varied ... they’re more a ‘method of cooking’ than an actual recipe, and the ingredients vary.
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Re: strange and interesting dishes!

Postby wargarden » May 16th, 2019, 5:58 am

"Bannock." One and one-half cups of corn meal: pout' over it scalding milk till it is of the consistency of soft gingerbread. Add three eggs, well beaten, three teaspoons of sugar, butter the size of a walnut, salt, baking powder (one small teaspoonful). Bake in a buttered pan. and when in the oven add On teacup of cold milk. Do not stir. Vineyard Haven. E. R.

CLIPPED FROM
The Boston Globe
Boston, Massachusetts
25 Oct 1894, Thu • Page 7
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Re: strange and interesting dishes!

Postby suffolk » May 16th, 2019, 9:47 am

Ah, that's very much a North American bannock ... the bannocks we know are of Scottish and North England origin, dating right back to the early 8th Century and probably earlier ... they're usually made of oatmeal or barley flour and bacon fat (no eggs or milk) and cooked over the fire on a girdle (a type of circular flat iron pan with no or only a slight rim).


There's also the Selkirk bannock which is more like a fruit bread or cake https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/112 ... rk-bannock
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Re: strange and interesting dishes!

Postby Gruney » May 16th, 2019, 10:17 am

Selkirk Bannock - I'm going to make that! I bring home a couple from Scotland, every year. Wonderful stuff. Thanks for researching the recipe.
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Re: strange and interesting dishes!

Postby suffolk » May 16th, 2019, 10:20 am

Enjoy, Gruney! :D
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Re: strange and interesting dishes!

Postby scullion » May 16th, 2019, 10:57 am

that sounds more like corn bread or a variant of corn pone. (not the selkirk bannock, obviously).
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Re: strange and interesting dishes!

Postby suffolk » May 16th, 2019, 11:27 am

I've been riffling fruitlessly through my bookshelves trying to find a reference to the cornmeal Bannocks made by native North American people ... I know I've read about them somewhere ... perhaps a library book ... I think what I read is that when Scottish settlers arrived in North America/Canada the native North Americans were making a sort of corn bread in a vaguely similar manner to the oat and/or barley meal bannocks made by the Scots and so this is what they were called by the settlers.
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Re: strange and interesting dishes!

Postby Ratatouille » May 16th, 2019, 2:30 pm

My research lead me to appreciate that bannock is simply an alternative name for a flatbread/cake made with grain flour. there are examples from as far apart as Innuit to Napalese via Selkirk! Actually the history is rather fascinating if you have a long time to read it!!
It raises an interesting question though does it not? If someone in Canada says they are cooking a bannock they mean something quite different from a cook in Nepal or to something Queen Victoria took with her tea.

However, reading Wargarden's recipe I did have a smile because it says "Until it resembles gingerbread" Now would this be Yorkshire parkin, Grasmere gingerbread ................... :lol:


Still. Right now life's too short to butter a slice of bannock!
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Re: strange and interesting dishes!

Postby earthmaiden » May 16th, 2019, 2:53 pm

... as a child I was always puzzled by the story of the Gingerbread Man. I couldn't work out how my grandmother's wonderful dark, almost gooey gingerbread could turn itself into that kind of man! I think I was grown up before I saw a gingerbread man (a ginger biscuit!) or German-style gingerbreads used to make decorations at Christmas etc.
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Re: strange and interesting dishes!

Postby Seatallan » May 16th, 2019, 3:22 pm

Here's a link to the Shetland Bannock recipe I tried a wee while back:

https://www.tasteofshetland.com/blog/a- ... d-bannocks

It's fascinating isn't it? There's a reference in the 'Thorn Birds' to the family at Drogheda (the Australian sheep ranch in the novel) sitting down to afternoon tea with 'fresh Bannocks'. I wonder what sort of Bannock the author had in mind?
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Re: strange and interesting dishes!

Postby suffolk » May 16th, 2019, 4:26 pm

“I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” —Winnie-the-Pooh
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Re: strange and interesting dishes!

Postby Pepper Pig » May 16th, 2019, 4:37 pm

Seatallan wrote:There's a reference in the 'Thorn Birds' to the family at Drogheda (the Australian sheep ranch in the novel) sitting down to afternoon tea with 'fresh Bannocks'. I wonder what sort of Bannock the author had in mind?


Ooh I loved Dr Kildare in that! :aww:
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Re: strange and interesting dishes!

Postby Ratatouille » May 16th, 2019, 6:47 pm

And guess what Wargarden doesn't seem in the least bit interested :rolleyes:
Never mind we've found ourselves an interesting topic for conversation.
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