a few old recipes

Out of the main bustle of the Coffee shop this is where people gather to share recipes and tips/tricks.

a few old recipes

Postby wargarden » June 30th, 2019, 1:27 am

The Atchison Daily Champion
Atchison, Kansas
29 Sep 1875, Wed • Page 2
MEAT LOAF. Chop fine whatever cold meat vou may have, fat and lean together ; add pepper,,
salt and finely-chopped onion, two slices of bread which have been soaked in milk, add one egg ;
mix well together and bake in a form. This makes an admirable tea and breakfast dish.

New England Farmer
Boston, Massachusetts
04 Jun 1853, Sat • Page 4
Egg Dumplings. Make a batter of a pint of milk, two well beaten eggs, a salt-spoonful of salt, and
flour enough to make a batter as thick as for pound -cake ; have a clean saucepan of boiling water,
let the water boil fast, drop in the batter by the tablespoonful ; four or five minutes will boil them,
take them with a skimmer on to a dish, put a bit of butter and pepper over, and serve with boiled'or
cold meat ; for a little desert, put butter aim grated nutmeg, with syrup or sugar over.

New England Farmer
Boston, Massachusetts
19 Dec 1828, Fri • Page 6
TOMATO SAUCE. Peel about one dozen good sized Tomatos put in a stew pan, with about two teaspoons-
full of brown sugar, a little salt, some pepper, and about one table spoonful of flour from a dredging box,
and a small piece of butter stew slowly one hour and a half (Do not add any water.) Some persons prefer
pounded cracker instead of flour.
Last edited by wargarden on June 30th, 2019, 8:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.
wargarden
Registered
 
Posts: 102
Joined: February 28th, 2019, 6:00 am

Re: a few old recipes

Postby Ratatouille » June 30th, 2019, 10:14 am

I've got a fabulous little book I picked up in Vermont in 1969 It's The New England Buttery Notebook. I've made quite a lot of recipes from it over the years. Some of the cookie recipes are very good indeed.
Cooking for those you care about is the most profound expression of love - Anne-Sophie Pic
Ratatouille
Registered
 
Posts: 8848
Joined: August 23rd, 2013, 11:48 am

Re: a few old recipes

Postby scullion » June 30th, 2019, 10:37 am

is a pint of inn a pint of beer or should it be a pint of milk?

if you are interested in old recipes - you should try looking, online, at 'the form of cury'. the oldest recipe book in the english language.
there are some of the recipes here, along with some other medieval recipes but translated into a more modern form of english!
the latter link has a good bibliography, for further reading, at the end.
User avatar
scullion
Registered
 
Posts: 13179
Joined: April 9th, 2010, 2:08 pm
Location: cornwall

Re: a few old recipes

Postby Seatallan » June 30th, 2019, 11:04 am

I wouldn't mind giving the tomato sauce recipe a go...
Food, Felines and Fells (in no particular order)
User avatar
Seatallan
Registered
 
Posts: 9738
Joined: April 1st, 2010, 3:28 pm
Location: Reading

Re: a few old recipes

Postby wargarden » June 30th, 2019, 2:08 pm

]here is a Maryland fried chicken recipe from 1815

Mrs. Virgil Maxcy's fried chickens "Cut up the chickens, pepper and salt them. Dredge them
well with flour on both sides and lay them on a sieve, each piece separately. Take a large
tablespoon of nice lard and when it boils throw in a good bunch of parsley and fry it quickly
that it may be green though crisp; then take it out, to be put on the chickens when served up.
"Afterwards put in the chickens and fry them briskly a yellowish brown and lay them on the dish
with the parsley over them. "Take the lard out of the pan and put in a piece of butter the size of a
small egg, and as soon as it boils dredge in a little flour and the moment it browns add a teacup of
milk and after shaking it round briskly in the pan for a minute pour it over the chickens and serve
them up hot "Care should be taken that the chickens should not be put into the lard until it boils and
that they be fried quickly and taken as soon as done out of tie pan, or they may taste of the lard.
"The parsley should be fried before the chickens as it gives an agree able flavour to the lard.
In order to have this dish to perfection, the chickens should be about two months old and very fat"
Last edited by wargarden on June 30th, 2019, 8:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.
wargarden
Registered
 
Posts: 102
Joined: February 28th, 2019, 6:00 am

Re: a few old recipes

Postby suffolk » June 30th, 2019, 2:18 pm

I can’t access that attachment ... it says it doesn’t exist any more :(
“I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” —Winnie-the-Pooh
User avatar
suffolk
Registered
 
Posts: 39631
Joined: August 11th, 2010, 6:47 am
Location: East Anglia, surprisingly!

Re: a few old recipes

Postby earthmaiden » June 30th, 2019, 2:42 pm

I was curious about 'inn' too. It sounds as though it should be some kind of ale. Beer batter works, as we know. New England Farmers might have tended to be teetotal though ;).
User avatar
earthmaiden
Registered
 
Posts: 11772
Joined: April 2nd, 2010, 8:36 pm
Location: Wiltshire. UK

Re: a few old recipes

Postby wargarden » June 30th, 2019, 8:34 pm

actual the OCR software messed up the word "milk" as "inn"
i corrected it in the original post
i also OCR'ed the chicken Maryland fried recipe attachment so it will now read as plain text.
wargarden
Registered
 
Posts: 102
Joined: February 28th, 2019, 6:00 am

Re: a few old recipes

Postby suffolk » July 1st, 2019, 5:22 am

Thanks
“I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” —Winnie-the-Pooh
User avatar
suffolk
Registered
 
Posts: 39631
Joined: August 11th, 2010, 6:47 am
Location: East Anglia, surprisingly!

Re: a few old recipes

Postby Ratatouille » July 1st, 2019, 9:12 am

Not to forget that a pint is only 16fl oz in the US = or was that so in the early 1980's
Cooking for those you care about is the most profound expression of love - Anne-Sophie Pic
Ratatouille
Registered
 
Posts: 8848
Joined: August 23rd, 2013, 11:48 am

Re: a few old recipes

Postby suffolk » July 1st, 2019, 9:52 am

Rats ... think you mean early 1800s ;)
“I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” —Winnie-the-Pooh
User avatar
suffolk
Registered
 
Posts: 39631
Joined: August 11th, 2010, 6:47 am
Location: East Anglia, surprisingly!

Re: a few old recipes

Postby scullion » July 1st, 2019, 10:45 am

i looked the fried chicken woman up (cos although i wouldn't eat it, it sounded quite a basic recipe), i doubt she ever made it herself and i bet her cook didn't make it like that, really, or is fried chicken in a white sauce a thing?
she lived at/owned a plantation (probably tobacco) called tulip hill. previous occupants and members of her family were in the slave trade.
User avatar
scullion
Registered
 
Posts: 13179
Joined: April 9th, 2010, 2:08 pm
Location: cornwall

Re: a few old recipes

Postby StokeySue » July 1st, 2019, 11:12 am

scullion wrote:i looked the fried chicken woman up (cos although i wouldn't eat it, it sounded quite a basic recipe), i doubt she ever made it herself and i bet her cook didn't make it like that, really, or is fried chicken in a white sauce a thing?
she lived at/owned a plantation (probably tobacco) called tulip hill. previous occupants and members of her family were in the slave trade.

Yes indeed, milk or cream gravy is a Southern US thing to this day, here’s a modern recipe. Quite similar apart from the garlic

https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2015/07/chicken-fried-chicken-with-cream-gravy-recipe.html

I saw a Hairy Bikers prog on US food, apparently fried chicken really took off a little later than that recipe as it was sold to train passengers

I’m intrigued that the meat loaf is made with cooked meat. I remember my mum making it that way as an alternative to rissoles to use up the last of the joint
Sue
User avatar
StokeySue
Registered
 
Posts: 21199
Joined: April 21st, 2010, 5:18 pm
Location: Stoke Newington (London)

Re: a few old recipes

Postby Ratatouille » July 1st, 2019, 12:30 pm

suffolk wrote:Rats ... think you mean early 1800s ;)


Got it Suffs :tu:
Cooking for those you care about is the most profound expression of love - Anne-Sophie Pic
Ratatouille
Registered
 
Posts: 8848
Joined: August 23rd, 2013, 11:48 am

Re: a few old recipes

Postby wargarden » July 1st, 2019, 1:33 pm

many 1950 recipes for meat loaf in UK and AU seem to use sausage meat and mince
must be because rationing.

here is meatloaf recipe "Mid Sussex Times - Tuesday 25 April 1905" The UK
Meat loaf.---- Chop fine two pounds of good lean beef , one-half of a pound of suet, and one
onion; put in mixing bowl, season with two tablespoonful salt saltspoonful pepper, add two
cupfuls of bread crumbs and moisten with two well beaten eggs; mix well and shape into the
form of a loaf , using the hands adding flour sufficient to prevent the loaf falling apart. bake in
moderate oven about 35 minutes, dusting with melted butter. Drain a bottle of mushrooms cut
from the stalks, then place them in a pan with two ounces of sweet butter, season with half
teaspoonful salt, one saltspoonful white pepper, cover and simmer 20 minutes pour over meat
loaf and serve hot---"Star"
Last edited by wargarden on July 1st, 2019, 2:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.
wargarden
Registered
 
Posts: 102
Joined: February 28th, 2019, 6:00 am

Re: a few old recipes

Postby StokeySue » July 1st, 2019, 1:49 pm

Not sure about beef a la mode - not a UK name for a dish that I know
I think what the US calls a pot roast we might call a braise in older UK recipes, before braise and casserole became a bit merged in domestic cooking.

I always find it odd that in the UK a casserole is a stew cooked in the oven, but in the US it's generally what we would call a bake or a gratin, we definitely don't think of tuna pasta bake or macaroni cheese as casseroles here - or didn't, I think the term is creeping in via TV cooks.

No, I don't know of another name for meat loaf in the UK, I think we just used to make a similar mixture and cook it in patties as "rissoles"
Sue
User avatar
StokeySue
Registered
 
Posts: 21199
Joined: April 21st, 2010, 5:18 pm
Location: Stoke Newington (London)

Re: a few old recipes

Postby earthmaiden » July 1st, 2019, 1:55 pm

I don't think Beef a la Mode or pot roast were particularly traditional names in the UK but I can't think what was. Maybe braised brisket or something like that?

When I lived in Australia (not until the 1960's), many recipes for things like meat loaf came from European immigrants who had settled during and after WWII and those earlier traditional European, particularly Jewish, recipes would be those recipes you have found I think. Probably the same in the USA. The UK and pre-war Australia (Australia was a UK colony and tastes and methods quite similar) didn't have quite the same history and I think that in earlier times meat loaf would have been a way of using previously roasted meat. It was traditional to have a roast on Sundays (roasted in the oven, not a pot roast) and to use up the leftover meat in inventive ways (such as meatloaf, rissoles, cottage pie etc) for as far as possible into the next week. I think you have to really look into the social history of different places to understand the roots of their food.
User avatar
earthmaiden
Registered
 
Posts: 11772
Joined: April 2nd, 2010, 8:36 pm
Location: Wiltshire. UK

Re: a few old recipes

Postby Ratatouille » July 1st, 2019, 3:23 pm

A casserole in French of course is a pan. As far as I can tell beef a la mode or beouf a la mode doesn't exsist in French cookokng. When a la mode appears it usually refers to a place or a person eg Tripes a la mode de Caen

I have an old recipe for beef mould which is in effect a meat loaf - doesn't sound very appealing though does it?
Cooking for those you care about is the most profound expression of love - Anne-Sophie Pic
Ratatouille
Registered
 
Posts: 8848
Joined: August 23rd, 2013, 11:48 am

Re: a few old recipes

Postby Seatallan » July 1st, 2019, 4:48 pm

I adore rissoles :chops: :hungry:
Food, Felines and Fells (in no particular order)
User avatar
Seatallan
Registered
 
Posts: 9738
Joined: April 1st, 2010, 3:28 pm
Location: Reading

Re: a few old recipes

Postby suffolk » July 1st, 2019, 5:07 pm

Seatallan wrote:I adore rissoles :chops: :hungry:


Ditto :chops:
“I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” —Winnie-the-Pooh
User avatar
suffolk
Registered
 
Posts: 39631
Joined: August 11th, 2010, 6:47 am
Location: East Anglia, surprisingly!

Re: a few old recipes

Postby Pepper Pig » July 1st, 2019, 7:20 pm

StokeySue wrote:
I saw a Hairy Bikers prog on US food, apparently fried chicken really took off a little later than that recipe as it was sold to train passengers



To do what??? :o :o :o
User avatar
Pepper Pig
Registered
 
Posts: 6154
Joined: June 9th, 2014, 7:18 pm
Location: Harrow-on-the-Hill

Re: a few old recipes

Postby StokeySue » July 1st, 2019, 7:30 pm

For train picnics! Could be cooked quickly without an oven and eaten without a dining table

KFC not all that innovative really
Sue
User avatar
StokeySue
Registered
 
Posts: 21199
Joined: April 21st, 2010, 5:18 pm
Location: Stoke Newington (London)

Re: a few old recipes

Postby Pepper Pig » July 1st, 2019, 7:32 pm

;)
User avatar
Pepper Pig
Registered
 
Posts: 6154
Joined: June 9th, 2014, 7:18 pm
Location: Harrow-on-the-Hill

Re: a few old recipes

Postby wargarden » July 3rd, 2019, 2:43 pm

Buffalo Evening News
Buffalo, New York
17 May 1902, Sat • Page 3
cocktail sauce
Six clams are used for a cocktail. The sauce Is made of tomato catsup,
horseradish, lemon Juice and clam Juice.All the ingredients should be
kept very cold. The cocktails can be served In glasses or in the half of
a lemon from-which the pulp has been removed.
wargarden
Registered
 
Posts: 102
Joined: February 28th, 2019, 6:00 am

Re: a few old recipes

Postby wargarden » July 3rd, 2019, 3:05 pm

here is classic uk recipe

Pearson's Weekly - Saturday 19 October 1895 p 16 London, England

This Yorkshire Pudding Recipe is given to me by old housekeeper,
who says it is equal to any pudding cooked under the usual
joint of beef. Break two eggs into a basin, add teaspoonful of salt,
then with a wooden spoon, mix with eggs as much flour as
they will take up, and add sufficient milk to bring the batter to
the consistency of thick cream. Bake in a square Yorkshire pudding
tin in which there are three or four tablespoonfuls of hot dripping.
Bake in a quick oven. When the underside is nicely browned,
if the top is not sufficiently so, hold it for a few moments
before a hot fire. Serve immediately
wargarden
Registered
 
Posts: 102
Joined: February 28th, 2019, 6:00 am

Re: a few old recipes

Postby Suelle » July 3rd, 2019, 3:14 pm

Yorkshire pudding is a can of worms to most British people, wargarden. As many recipes as there are cooks, and every-one who is a successful YP maker has their own tips. :lol:
User avatar
Suelle
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 5573
Joined: March 30th, 2010, 6:19 pm
Location: Cambridgeshire

Re: a few old recipes

Postby wargarden » July 3rd, 2019, 3:35 pm

Suelle maybe i should start thread on yorkshire pudding. Could you give me a list of
battles and wars fought over Yorkshire pudding controversies.

how can a recipe with only 5 ingredients cause such a problem.
250 g all-purpose flour, approximately 2 cups
7.4 ml kosher salt
4 large eggs, room temperature
,4L whole milk, room temperature
60ml beef drippings
wargarden
Registered
 
Posts: 102
Joined: February 28th, 2019, 6:00 am

Re: a few old recipes

Postby Suelle » July 3rd, 2019, 4:09 pm

wargarden wrote:Suelle maybe i should start thread on yorkshire pudding. Could you give me a list of
battles and wars fought over Yorkshire pudding controversies.

how can a recipe with only 5 ingredients cause such a problem.
250 g all-purpose flour, approximately 2 cups
7.4 ml kosher salt
4 large eggs, room temperature
,4L whole milk, room temperature
60ml beef drippings


There's a problem in this recipe! I would contend, for that amount of flour you wouldn't need more than two eggs. Anyone who uses a higher proportion of eggs than 1 egg per 100g flour (which includes many modern chefs) is someone who can't make a proper YP, in my opinion! :D
User avatar
Suelle
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 5573
Joined: March 30th, 2010, 6:19 pm
Location: Cambridgeshire

Re: a few old recipes

Postby StokeySue » July 3rd, 2019, 4:15 pm

Well for a start, do you use all purpose (plain) flour?
I've heard it suggested that a higher gluten flour is better

Do you make one or individual puds, and if so how big?

The proportions of egg and liquid vary hugely - I'm not sure there is a real standard. And real Yorkshire folks don't measure any of the ingredients - I prefer to, but can make it by working the flour into the egg until it is the "right" consistency, as in Pearson's recipe then thinning "just enough" with milk. Though of course, some people use milk and water... and a tsp seems to me to be far too much salt for a 2 egg mix

Read this - The Prize Winning Chinese Yorkshire Pudding, In the original book, Grigosn explains that there is such a thing as tai luk, it's msg powder, I leave it out

http://www.larecettedujour.org/2007/02/the_prize_winning_chinese_york.php
Sue
User avatar
StokeySue
Registered
 
Posts: 21199
Joined: April 21st, 2010, 5:18 pm
Location: Stoke Newington (London)

Re: a few old recipes

Postby Suelle » July 3rd, 2019, 4:33 pm

I use my mother's recipe which is 3 rounded or heaped tablespoons to one egg and enough milk to make it feel right. Rounded tablespoons makes 6 individual puddings, heaped makes 6. I just weighed 3 heaped tablespoons and it was 98g.

Purists claim that you need a very hot tin (baking pan) containing hot fat, but I bake YPs in a silicon mould which can't be heated empty, so put the hot fat into each mould, then pour in the batter and cook from cold. It still works.
User avatar
Suelle
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 5573
Joined: March 30th, 2010, 6:19 pm
Location: Cambridgeshire

Re: a few old recipes

Postby Seatallan » July 3rd, 2019, 4:49 pm

StokeySue wrote:Do you make one or individual puds, and if so how big?


Has to be one pud (in a medium sized roasting tin). :hungry:

Wargarden, you may wish you'd never started this one! :D
Food, Felines and Fells (in no particular order)
User avatar
Seatallan
Registered
 
Posts: 9738
Joined: April 1st, 2010, 3:28 pm
Location: Reading

Re: a few old recipes

Postby wargarden » July 3rd, 2019, 5:26 pm

Individual pudding are not yorkshire pudding.
so call individual puddings are popovers made with dripping and
not butter and usually in UK ; baked in a muffin pan and not a poppover pan.

here is picture of popovers not mini/ individual yorkshire puddings.
popovers.JPG
popover
wargarden
Registered
 
Posts: 102
Joined: February 28th, 2019, 6:00 am

Re: a few old recipes

Postby wargarden » July 3rd, 2019, 5:37 pm

here is picture of yorkshire pudding.
SAM_0039.JPG
Yorkshire pudding
wargarden
Registered
 
Posts: 102
Joined: February 28th, 2019, 6:00 am

Re: a few old recipes

Postby Prettykiwicrazy » July 3rd, 2019, 5:40 pm

No you’re wrong , popovers are American . I’ve never heard of popovers at all in UK cuisine . Yorkshire puddings are probably more commonly served individually than a massive one . Go to any British pub on a Sunday and you’ll see YPs sold individually by the bucketload .

Are you American war garden ?
Prettykiwicrazy
Registered
 
Posts: 1786
Joined: March 31st, 2010, 7:59 pm
Location: Devon

Re: a few old recipes

Postby earthmaiden » July 3rd, 2019, 5:51 pm

Popovers and Yorkshire pudding have a similar recipe. Yorkshire puddings are often served as an individual thing these days rather than one large one and are often called individual Yorkshire puddings but never popovers (in the UK). They are identical though. I would listen to what people who've lived in the UK all their lives say as well as learning from books and internet.
User avatar
earthmaiden
Registered
 
Posts: 11772
Joined: April 2nd, 2010, 8:36 pm
Location: Wiltshire. UK

Re: a few old recipes

Postby StokeySue » July 3rd, 2019, 6:10 pm

wargarden wrote:Individual pudding are not yorkshire pudding.
so call individual puddings are popovers made with dripping and
not butter and usually in UK ; baked in a muffin pan and not a poppover pan.

We don’t actually use the term popover at all in the UK - so they are all Yorkies here!

And there is a special Yorkshire pudding tin that makes large individual puddings, each about 4 inches across, the holes are much shallower than a muffin pan
852E2ED6-E9BE-4C2F-AAFD-BC6DBA0E5A1E.jpeg
852E2ED6-E9BE-4C2F-AAFD-BC6DBA0E5A1E.jpeg (15.93 KiB) Viewed 310 times


Not sure the link will work, but this is actually called a 4Hole Yorkshire Pudding Tray

https://www.lakeland.co.uk/70179/Lakeland-4-Hole-Yorkshire-Pudding-Tray?src=gfeed&efid=Cj0KCQjwpPHoBRC3ARIsALfx-_JV1bNS3bLSP5Sy1kzRXPHJoZCSjkWKB5YN6LsXlzWI_wu7GI5eruMaAqxcEALw_wcB:G:s&s_kwcid=AL!49!3!105382843949!!!g!48901478412!&ev_chn=shop&ef_id=Cj0KCQjwpPHoBRC3ARIsALfx-_JV1bNS3bLSP5Sy1kzRXPHJoZCSjkWKB5YN6LsXlzWI_wu7GI5eruMaAqxcEALw_wcB:G:s&gclid=Cj0KCQjwpPHoBRC3ARIsALfx-_JV1bNS3bLSP5Sy1kzRXPHJoZCSjkWKB5YN6LsXlzWI_wu7GI5eruMaAqxcEALw_wcB
Sue
User avatar
StokeySue
Registered
 
Posts: 21199
Joined: April 21st, 2010, 5:18 pm
Location: Stoke Newington (London)

Re: a few old recipes

Postby Suelle » July 3rd, 2019, 6:12 pm

This is how I make individual Yorkshire puddings, and as Sue says, they are made in a shallow pan, not deep muffin pans;

https://mainlybaking.blogspot.com/2009/ ... dings.html
User avatar
Suelle
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 5573
Joined: March 30th, 2010, 6:19 pm
Location: Cambridgeshire

Re: a few old recipes

Postby Pepper Pig » July 3rd, 2019, 6:14 pm

Teaching your grandmother to suck eggs comes to mind wargarden.i think we all know what a Yorkshire pudding is without being lectured and patronised.
User avatar
Pepper Pig
Registered
 
Posts: 6154
Joined: June 9th, 2014, 7:18 pm
Location: Harrow-on-the-Hill

Re: a few old recipes

Postby StokeySue » July 3rd, 2019, 6:15 pm

Those look perfect Suelle! :hi5:
Sue
User avatar
StokeySue
Registered
 
Posts: 21199
Joined: April 21st, 2010, 5:18 pm
Location: Stoke Newington (London)

Re: a few old recipes

Postby Pepper Pig » July 3rd, 2019, 6:20 pm

Nice one Suelle.
User avatar
Pepper Pig
Registered
 
Posts: 6154
Joined: June 9th, 2014, 7:18 pm
Location: Harrow-on-the-Hill

Re: a few old recipes

Postby wargarden » July 3rd, 2019, 7:56 pm

as i said in my post there are two major difference between popover and individual Yorkshire puddings.
1.drippings are used yorkshire puddings and popovers use butter as the fat.
2. popover use a popover pan and yorkshire puddings use drippings pan

also the recipe and how to make popovers has been
available in the UK since 1860
the following recipe appeared in the uk newspaper

Liverpool Mercury, etc.
Liverpool, Merseyside, England
28 May 1860, Mon • Page 3

Popovers. Stir three eggs, three cups of flour, and three cups
of milk to a smooth batter; bake in teacups half filled with the batter 35 minutes.
Butter the cups carefully, and they will turn out. Eat with sauce. American Housewife.
wargarden
Registered
 
Posts: 102
Joined: February 28th, 2019, 6:00 am

Re: a few old recipes

Postby Pepper Pig » July 3rd, 2019, 8:12 pm

It’s dripping, not drippings. But that’s not what people usually use today.

We Brits, as mentioned before, do not recognise the word popovers other than as something foreign. Please read Suelle’s blog post.
User avatar
Pepper Pig
Registered
 
Posts: 6154
Joined: June 9th, 2014, 7:18 pm
Location: Harrow-on-the-Hill

Re: a few old recipes

Postby StokeySue » July 3rd, 2019, 8:21 pm

Drippings is a US term, and can be different from dripping in current British usage, as dripping in British usage means any rendered fat, whether that naturally exuded during cooking, or rendered from trimmings (butcher’s dripping); as far as I know drippings are just the stuff in the bottom of the pan

OK, so the Liverpool Echo had a recipe for popovers 160 years ago, but the term is no more in current British usage than “fall” for autumn.
Sue
User avatar
StokeySue
Registered
 
Posts: 21199
Joined: April 21st, 2010, 5:18 pm
Location: Stoke Newington (London)

Re: a few old recipes

Postby wargarden » July 3rd, 2019, 8:44 pm

Pepper Pig read that part i also pointed out in my post that popover recipes have been in uk newspapers since 1860.
there over hundred separate recipes and mention in uk newspapers since the one mentioned
in my previous post. the ww2 food facts advertisement 239 from jan 28-feb 1945 had a recipe for popovers.
wargarden
Registered
 
Posts: 102
Joined: February 28th, 2019, 6:00 am

Re: a few old recipes

Postby StokeySue » July 3rd, 2019, 9:22 pm

OK so you found a reference 3 generations old for popovers in a UK publication

It’s irrelevant. I know what they are because I’ve seen them mentioned in magazine articles and recipes but that doesn’t make them a current British foodstuff

I can assu[url][/url]re you if you stopped people on the streets of London today they’d all recognise a small Yorkshire pudding, but only a rare Ina Garten fan would know the word popover and I’d be really surprised if they spontaneously identified a pud as a popover. If in the US they are called popovers fine, it’s a slightly different vernacular but not in the UK.

These are very popular the standard size is (a fraction over 2 inches in diameter

https://auntbessies.co.uk/ranges/yorkshire-puddings
Sue
User avatar
StokeySue
Registered
 
Posts: 21199
Joined: April 21st, 2010, 5:18 pm
Location: Stoke Newington (London)

Re: a few old recipes

Postby Suelle » July 3rd, 2019, 9:33 pm

Told you it was a can of worms! :lol:

When you're tired of YPs there's Dutch Babies and Danish Aebleskiver to consider.
User avatar
Suelle
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 5573
Joined: March 30th, 2010, 6:19 pm
Location: Cambridgeshire

Re: a few old recipes

Postby northleedsbhoy » July 3rd, 2019, 10:34 pm

Pepper Pig wrote:Teaching your grandmother to suck eggs comes to mind wargarden.i think we all know what a Yorkshire pudding is without being lectured and patronised.


Yep, hit the nail on the head. Don't know if wargarden is a he or she, or which country the posts originate but although they are mildly amusing they do get a bit irritating, especially with the wealth and depth of knowledge and skills that other board members have.

Cheers
NLB :tu:
northleedsbhoy
Registered
 
Posts: 1704
Joined: March 31st, 2010, 12:26 pm
Location: Leeds, West Yorkshire

Re: a few old recipes

Postby scullion » July 3rd, 2019, 11:03 pm

wargarden wrote:Liverpool Mercury, etc.
Liverpool, Merseyside, England
28 May 1860, Mon • Page 3
Popovers. Stir three eggs, three cups of flour, and three cups
of milk to a smooth batter; bake in teacups half filled with the batter 35 minutes.
Butter the cups carefully, and they will turn out. Eat with sauce. American Housewife.


a) liverpool is a port known for its multicultural, ethnic diversity, an immigrant/emigrant society and has been for centuries it doesn't mean that it's a uk recipe.
b) eat with sauce? any particular type? hp, tomato, tartare, cheese, mint, apple, chocolate ... and so on and so on ?
c) look at the last two words in that quote - what does it tell you‽‽
User avatar
scullion
Registered
 
Posts: 13179
Joined: April 9th, 2010, 2:08 pm
Location: cornwall

Re: a few old recipes

Postby wargarden » July 4th, 2019, 1:46 am

1.american housewife was magazine.
2. food facts advertisement mentioned the above post was in over 70 papers all over uk in 1945
3 also there are several hundred reference in papers all over uk that include the popover recipes and serving them from 1860 to modern times.
scullion if want with i post the hundreds uk papers references over the forum message system to you.
since it would clog up this thread if I posted them here.
4. as per sauce you can use any sauce,drizzle,honey with popovers.
5.popovers go great with all types butters , jams, jellies; and chutneys
6. since popover are hollow you can stuff them with anything from, chicken salad, custard, cream or mousse.
7 you can use them like small bowl put chili ,fish chowder or thick soup in them.
wargarden
Registered
 
Posts: 102
Joined: February 28th, 2019, 6:00 am

Re: a few old recipes

Postby scullion » July 4th, 2019, 5:15 am

thank you but no thank you. you are preaching to someone who dislikes yorkshire puddings - as previously mentioned on one of the threads you started - and i've not made it/them since i was about twelve.
being bombarded with archaic recipes of things one doesn't eat is no-ones idea of a good read. if i had been interested i would have already searched them out online or at the library - i'm quite good at research.

what is your interest in all these recipes? is it to do with your job? are you a student or researching for some reason? we assume you're in america but what is your native tongue? it would be nice to know a little about you other than your interest in old newspaper/magazine recipes.
as you may have noticed, we tend to chat, rather, on this forum. if you are expecting to just glean recipes from us, or ' do we still eat ... in the uk' you may be disappointed.
User avatar
scullion
Registered
 
Posts: 13179
Joined: April 9th, 2010, 2:08 pm
Location: cornwall

Next

Return to The Kitchen

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests