Regional Cakes

Out of the main bustle of the Coffee shop this is where people gather to share recipes and tips/tricks.

Regional Cakes

Postby earthmaiden » August 30th, 2019, 6:35 am

https://www.holidaycottages.co.uk/blog/ ... =editorial

This is part of an advertisement with which I have no connections.
However, I found the content quite fascinating. I can honestly say that I have never heard of some of these regional cakes - but they all look interesting! Can you recognise those out of your area (and those within it?).
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby StokeySue » August 30th, 2019, 7:13 am

Quite interesting though there are some inaccuracies - for a start they they can’t spell whisky
I don’t think Shrewsbury is in the South of England and although I’ve lived in the South of England all my life and in London for most of it, I’ve never met a London bun
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby earthmaiden » August 30th, 2019, 7:23 am

Well, something like this isn't going to be perfect but I thought it interesting all the same - I think many have faded into obscurity which is a shame. There is a Wiki entry for London buns https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_bun

Do Empire biscuits still exist in Scotland? I have never heard of them.
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby Suelle » August 30th, 2019, 7:23 am

Some of the 'specialities', such as Fifteens from Northern Ireland, look relatively modern.
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby Herbidacious » August 30th, 2019, 7:34 am

Well there is a list of references at the end of the article.

I didn't realize teacakes were specifically northern. And I think it should be Yorkshire curd tart, not cake.

But yes, interesting, and nice graphics. Was amused to see Tottenham cake in there.
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby earthmaiden » August 30th, 2019, 7:49 am

I agree Suelle. I see by looking them up they are quite a thing in Northern Ireland, they seem to have originated in Belfast and not travelled much further. Wouldn't mind trying them!
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby Busybee » August 30th, 2019, 8:37 am

I see a fat rascal has made the list. Peculiar to Yorkshire? I’d say peculiar to Bettys as they guard the name ferociously taking legal action against any cafe which bakes and sells them. Something which I struggle to understand as a Bettys grandson/nephew has an excellent cook book which includes the recipe.

Anywho, excellent list- an empire biscuit strikes me as a jammy dodger with extra icing and a cherry on top, it must be upcycling :lol:

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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby Oat » August 30th, 2019, 8:40 am

Ecclefechan tart, Melrose tart, empire biscuits, snowies, caramel logs, tablet, macaroon bars and black bun have all been sampled by us in the last nine days................it would be rude not to when visiting Scotland :D
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby liketocook » August 30th, 2019, 9:22 am

Empire biscuits are still very much a thing in Scotland EM
Oat - sounds as though you're working your way through the bakers- you need to add a "Cumnock tart" to your list if you see any https://twitter.com/thecumnocktryst/sta ... lang=en-gb and please lob a rhubarb one my way :D
From the list I've never heard of "Tipsy Laird" but the rest are all still popular.
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby Ratatouille » August 30th, 2019, 9:28 am

I want to know where the singn' hinnies, border tart and granny loaf are for a start . I'm sure Shrewsberry biscuits have currants. I must do further research so thanks !
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby Herbidacious » August 30th, 2019, 9:40 am

Couold add Gipsy Tart and Manchester Tart?

Meanwhile...

https://metro.co.uk/2019/07/23/greggs-s ... -10444317/
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby Oat » August 30th, 2019, 10:01 am

We have had pineapple tarts and raspberry ones and border tart on previous trips here. Never had a cumnock tart, we may go out today :x J eats scotch pies and bridies, he would eat them daily if he could. We went to the Buffalo farm in Kirkcaldy and J said the buffalo burgers were very good, we have sausages, steaks and a steak pie in the freezer to take home, all produced from buffalo from the farm.
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby liketocook » August 30th, 2019, 10:16 am

Oat wrote:We have had pineapple tarts and raspberry ones and border tart on previous trips here. Never had a cumnock tart, we may go out today :x J eats scotch pies and bridies, he would eat them daily if he could. We went to the Buffalo farm in Kirkcaldy and J said the buffalo burgers were very good, we have sausages, steaks and a steak pie in the freezer to take home, all produced from buffalo from the farm.

I've had buffalo from there it was gorgeous. :chops: If you are on the East Coast I doubt you'll find a Cumnock tart they're more a South of Scotland/Ayrshire speciality but worth trying if you do.
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby Oat » August 30th, 2019, 10:21 am

Something to look for on our travels, probably next year. The peas we bought locally never made it to the pan :)
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby liketocook » August 30th, 2019, 10:30 am

Oat wrote:Something to look for on our travels, probably next year. The peas we bought locally never made it to the pan :)

The ones I grow never make it that far either :D .
Possibly not classed as cakes but soda & girdle scones are popular as is what we call a crumpet which is like a large pancake, thinner than a drop scone but still quite thick and usually the size of a small side plate/large saucer. Carmel tarts are also popular, an individual pastry case filled with soft carmel with grated chocolate or a chocolate button on the top. They were a favourite at school dinners served with custard but eaten as a cake rather than pudding.
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby Oat » August 30th, 2019, 10:48 am

Lots of places to see and foods to try, caramel tarts sound as if they need *researching* . . . . . . . . .
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby scullion » August 30th, 2019, 11:31 am

no saffron buns or heavy cake!
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby Suelle » August 30th, 2019, 12:03 pm

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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby Ratatouille » August 30th, 2019, 12:30 pm

I always thought maids of honor are a London thing and Lardy cake, which doesn't look in the least like the illustartion hailed from Berkshire and Wiltshire
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby earthmaiden » August 30th, 2019, 1:33 pm

So many lovely cakes and teatime treats! Wiltshire claims lardy cake as it was a 'pig' county with lots of spare lard. However, my earliest memories of lardy cake were from a bakers in Chichester, Sussex where my grandmother lived. They were thick with fruit and had a sticky coating second to none. I have heard of Hampshire lardy cakes too. I think each county has it's own. The Wiltshire ones I have tried in over 40 years of living here always seem a bit mean with the fruit and stickiness.
Singing Hinnie! We used to make that when I was a child - and no connections with the NE! Our elderly neighbour in Norfolk, who had grown up on the north Norfolk coast in the 1890's (and whose cooking repertoire, although delicious, had probably changed little since), made gorgeous Maids of Honour.

PS - can't wait to visit Scotland!
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby Oat » August 30th, 2019, 1:44 pm

Maids of Honour in Worcester are cake like in a shortcrust pastry shell (and that seems common around the country,think Mr Kipling) But Maids of Honour in our local bakers in Hull are more like very soft curd tarts in a flaky pastry, still with jam and icing. Never found them like this anywhere else.
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby Ratatouille » August 30th, 2019, 2:09 pm

Maids of honour recipes seem to vary depending onwhere they are made:
It would seem that Richmond and Kew use this sort of recipe ;
https://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/int ... -of-honour. I know these ones which are what I knew from Gran's Bero book
https://snapguide.com/guides/bake-maids-of-honour/
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby earthmaiden » August 30th, 2019, 2:26 pm

Ooh, I didn't know about the curd ones - which must be related to the originals. Have only come across the Bero sort.
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby Oat » August 30th, 2019, 2:43 pm

I think a taste test might be in order :chops:
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby suffolk » August 30th, 2019, 4:24 pm

I’ve never tried it, but Ipswich Pudding does sound tasty http://www.foodsofengland.co.uk/ipswich ... udding.htm
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby earthmaiden » August 30th, 2019, 5:50 pm

Oat wrote:I think a taste test might be in order :chops:


Yes, maybe a regional bakeoff! :lol:
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby Seatallan » August 31st, 2019, 9:57 am

Ratatouille wrote:I always thought maids of honor are a London thing and Lardy cake, which doesn't look in the least like the illustartion hailed from Berkshire and Wiltshire


I always thought Lardy Cake was a Hampshire special but as EM says, there's probably variants from different counties. Come to think of it, Dolly Winthrop makes a Lardy Cake in 'Silas Marner' (which is set in the Midlands).
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby wargarden » August 31st, 2019, 6:57 pm

i am big fan of smith island cake,thin layer cakes and lemon bars.
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby Gruney » August 31st, 2019, 7:35 pm

Would Sussex Pond Pudding be allowed? I haven't made it for a couple of years, but I really do like it.
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby earthmaiden » August 31st, 2019, 8:53 pm

Love the idea of an official State cake!

Yes, I think we should allow Sussex Pond pud. I have never made (or eaten) one but have always thought it sounded nice. I have just looked at a 'Felicity' version and was surprised to see that early versions of the pud did not contain lemon and that her steaming method takes place in the oven! That'd save steamy windows.
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby Ratatouille » September 1st, 2019, 4:00 pm

If we start on proper puddings it could become a huge tasting!

Sussex pond was my dad's favourite oudding.
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby Gruney » September 1st, 2019, 4:16 pm

Ratatouille wrote:If we start on proper puddings it could become a huge tasting!


Let's do it!
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby wargarden » September 1st, 2019, 5:34 pm

is there really difference between a pudding and a cake or
Is the cooking method the deciding factor in calling something
a cake the an other a pudding.
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby suffolk » September 1st, 2019, 5:43 pm

A cake and a pudding are two discrete things.

A pudding is a dessert eaten as a course of a main meal (except steak & kidney pudding and other savoury puddings, which aren’t)

Cakes are eaten at tea-time.
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby wargarden » September 1st, 2019, 6:13 pm

suffolk so if serve a chocolate pound cake. it would be pudding if served at end main meal but cake it served at tea time.
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby Suelle » September 1st, 2019, 6:53 pm

Cake can be puddings, if served at the end of a meal, but 'puddings' also covers things like pies, fruit crumbles, baked/steamed sponge cakes served hot, sweet suet puddings, milk puddings (rice, semolina) etc etc.

Depending on your upbringing, both in terms of location and dare I say it, class, you may also call cold desserts 'pudding'.

Pudding, as eaten in the USA, is almost unknown here - blancmange may be the nearest equivalent, from what I can gather.
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby StokeySue » September 1st, 2019, 8:07 pm

Seatallan wrote:
Ratatouille wrote:I always thought maids of honor are a London thing and Lardy cake, which doesn't look in the least like the illustartion hailed from Berkshire and Wiltshire


I always thought Lardy Cake was a Hampshire special but as EM says, there's probably variants from different counties. Come to think of it, Dolly Winthrop makes a Lardy Cake in 'Silas Marner' (which is set in the Midlands).


Lardy cakes are predominantly a Wessex thing - they come from all around that piece of hog heaven
Wiltshire ones contain fruit such as currants but the Hampshire and Isle of Wight versions are without fruit but with icing

The shapes vary quite a bit, probably from village to village way back when. Hampshire and IOW cakes are a fat finger shape

But I’m sure cakes were made by adding lard and a little sugar + any available spice and currants to spare bread dough everywhere that lard was a cheap, plentiful commodity

All are utterly disgusting IMO
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby suffolk » September 1st, 2019, 8:38 pm

wargarden wrote:suffolk so if serve a chocolate pound cake. it would be pudding if served at end main meal but cake it served at tea time.


To me it would need custard, a hot sauce such as chocolate or vanilla sauce, or pouring cream if served as a pudding after a main course.
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby Ratatouille » September 2nd, 2019, 9:22 am

Or perhaps a dollop of ice cream / I would also add they would be eaten with a spoon or a fork or both.
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby earthmaiden » September 2nd, 2019, 9:30 am

I am always slightly disappointed when cake is served for pudding. As Suffs said before, cake is for tea (or sometimes elevenses these days) and pudding is for pudding. Chocolate Pound cake is not pudding (or dessert or afters or whatever you choose to call it ;) ).

That said, when I used to visit the USA, my friend often had the main course at supper time (which is often around 5pm) and saved the sweet course until mid-evening. That was rather nice and cake worked well - it was rarely eaten at the table.

StokeySue wrote: All are utterly disgusting IMO

:o - I wonder if you ever had one from the bakers in North Street, Chichesterin the 50's/60's? I know you weren't that far away. They were a different animal to any other lardy cake I have ever tasted :chops: . Lardy cake is best served slightly warm.
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby suffolk » September 2nd, 2019, 9:32 am

Yes you’re right Rats ... puddings/desserts are eaten with a spoon and fork .... creamy sponges and other softer cakes are eaten with a cake fork (no spoon) ... slices of firm fruit and Madeira type cakes can be picked up with fingers to be eaten.
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby Seatallan » September 2nd, 2019, 10:57 am

StokeySue wrote:Wiltshire ones contain fruit such as currants but the Hampshire and Isle of Wight versions are without fruit but with icing


Yes- that's exactly how I remember them!! My mum wasn't keen but dad and I adored them... :chops:
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby Herbidacious » September 3rd, 2019, 6:29 pm

I would say that pudding, in the somewhat colloqial useage, is used interchangeably with dessert i.e. just a sweet thing eaten as a course, after the main, but not necessarily at the end of the meal, of course (!) But it's also, perhaps confusingly, a specific type of dessert, or indeed savoury dish. But what type it is is no uniform. Rice pudding bears no relation to suet pudding in terms of ingredients or cooking style.

Question is what makes the dessert type of pudding a course? Intuitively a bar of chocolate eaten after a savoury course is not a dessert, just because it's served after the main course, but I suppose if you served and presented it in a certain way, it could be a (potentially rather pretentious and/or unsatisfactory) pudding/dessert.
One can also eat what would normally be a dessert at other times of the day, of course, as in apple pie for breakfast. But is it actually a pudding under these circumstances?! Or just a 'pudding' or a pudding like 'meal'?
And as has been said, or rejected, one can, I think, eat cake for dessert which makes it a pudding?!
i.e. there is a lot of imprecise useage going on, which is absolutely fine.

Have Chorley cakes been mentioned? Or Bakewell pudding, as oppsoed to tart? (Which imo is not really a pudding...!)
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby StokeySue » September 3rd, 2019, 6:34 pm

If it was the sweet course at the end of the meal it was pudding when I was growing up

Even if it was ice cream
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby earthmaiden » September 3rd, 2019, 6:49 pm

Yes, and in those days apple pie for breakfast was unheard of! :lol:
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby Herbidacious » September 3rd, 2019, 7:29 pm

I am glad we are less constrained by some conventions these days :) I don't really eat breakfast, but I sometimes have cereal for lunch.
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby Seatallan » September 4th, 2019, 9:45 am

Herbidacious wrote:I sometimes have cereal for lunch.


We often had cereal as a snack before going to bed when I was little. :D
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby Herbidacious » September 4th, 2019, 12:49 pm

I had a slice of bread pudding i.e. served as cake for dessert today...
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby Herbidacious » September 4th, 2019, 12:50 pm

Yes we used to have cereal for 'supper' (i.e snack before bed) too. Also, bizarrely, raisins in milk.

I had a slice of bread pudding i.e. served as cake for dessert today...
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Re: Regional Cakes

Postby wargarden » September 4th, 2019, 2:36 pm

here is a few from my local area:
Lord Baltimore cake
Lady Baltimore cake
Maryland black walnut cake
LeVeque Man-Trap cake
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