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'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 7th, 2019, 6:52 pm
by Suelle
Are there actually any brands around that really do spread straight from the fridge?

I had some fairly soft white bread for lunch today and had to wait 5 minutes before the blobs of 'spreadable' President butter could be spread properly. Not the end of the world, but it's annoying when things don't do what they claim to do. If the only thing the butter will spread on is hot toast, then it shouldn't claim to be 'spreadable'.

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 7th, 2019, 7:16 pm
by suffolk
Sorry, I don’t know ‘cos I don’t buy them. We only use butter butter and I keep about a third of a pack in a covered butter dish on the worktop ... in the winter it lives at the end of the worktop near to a hot water pipe ... there’s a rule in our kitchen that the person who uses the last piece of butter washes the butter dish and puts another piece of butter in it ... our butter always spreads ;)

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 7th, 2019, 7:34 pm
by StokeySue
Butter butter really doesn’t works for a single person who doesn’t eat butter at every meal

My choices are
1, Country Life
2. Lurpak

Z-list are Anchor (vile) and President (delicious, but I’m not sure it’s even as soft as the block)

ETA given how many one person households there are, I always wonder why it’s so hard to get 250g tubs, all <expletive deleted> 500g

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 7th, 2019, 7:41 pm
by suffolk
We don’t eat butter at every meal ... the two of us get through less than a pack of butter in a week ... butter is fine kept out of the fridge for a few days ... our family didn’t have a fridge until the mid seventies ... I’ve always kept a small amount of butter out of the fridge ... even when I lived on my own. :D

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 7th, 2019, 7:54 pm
by Herbidacious
Ah interesting that Anchor is on the Z list, Sue. I will try Country Life next time. Lurpak not salty enough I think...
We usually have some of this sort of thing in the fridge, but also always have a good butter on the go. At the moment some unpasteurized farm butter (as opposed to factory) from Upper Normandy and the raw Bungay butter. (And then there's the smoked butter...)
We don't get through it very quickly (one every 3-4 weeks?) so it lives in the fridge. But when we are in France we have been known to get through a packet in three days :o

To answer the question, you need to get Anchor out about five minutes in advance. That's as much as I know.

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 7th, 2019, 8:09 pm
by suffolk
The raw Bungay butter (made in the Norfolk/Suffolk border) is fabulous :chops:

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 7th, 2019, 8:13 pm
by wargarden
maybe you need to get another brand

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 7th, 2019, 8:27 pm
by StokeySue
I always have really good butter in the fridge ( and often the freezer) for cooking and entertaining. But for the odd piece of toast or sandwich spreadable works for me

There’s a very funny Kevin Bridges routine about trying to make a crisp sandwich using spreadable that doesn’t spread, but I can’t find it on line.

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 7th, 2019, 8:58 pm
by earthmaiden
I have had Lurpack before and it seemed alright.

I use ordinary butter - usually supermarket own brand. I would keep it out of the fridge in a butter dish but it clutters an already cluttered surface because I don't use that much. If I want to use it for spreading I take a lump off the block and put it in a tiny dish in the microwave for nanoseconds - lovely and soft for even the softest bread.

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 7th, 2019, 9:39 pm
by Suelle
StokeySue wrote:Butter butter really doesn’t works for a single person who doesn’t eat butter at every meal

My choices are
1, Country Life
2. Lurpak

Z-list are Anchor (vile) and President (delicious, but I’m not sure it’s even as soft as the block)

ETA given how many one person households there are, I always wonder why it’s so hard to get 250g tubs, all <expletive deleted> 500g


Thanks, Sue - my sentiments too, particularly about the non-availability of small packs! I only eat butter for Saturday and Sunday lunch - the only time I eat bread - so even a small 250g pack (if you can find one) lasts for well over a month. I got fed up with non-butter spreads because they have so many additives, and often palm oil too. I'll try your suggestions.

I could be more organised and take out the amount of butter I need in advance, but I haven't managed that yet! And microwaving is OK unless you go too far - and anything that gets too soft can't really be chilled and re-used successfully. A spread that's mostly butter and tastes good is what I need.

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 8th, 2019, 6:28 am
by suffolk
The internet is full of instructions on how to make your own spreadable butter ... at least then you'll know which sort of oil has been added.

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 8th, 2019, 7:18 am
by Busybee
We use butter butter - but have a stainless steel insulated butter dish. An absolute godsend. Keeps it cool in really hot weather and spreadable in the cold. I don’t think it’s ever not spreadable. It lives next to the breadbin.

Whilst we don’t use a lot of butter, it’s not something that I’ve ever worried about being left out..........maybe because my mum always leaves hers out.

BB

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 8th, 2019, 9:56 am
by KC2
We use Lurpak, which is fine, haven't really tried any of the others. I remember we used to like Olivio in the dim and distant past!

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 8th, 2019, 10:09 am
by StokeySue
suffolk wrote:The internet is full of instructions on how to make your own spreadable butter ... at least then you'll know which sort of oil has been added.

Hardly worth the effort for a single person who just wants it for the occasional sandwich or slice of toast. And this is a case where I’d expect commercial mixing equipment to do a better job than anything you’d have at home - a Kenwood or Kitchenaid would probably do a decent job with a large amount, but not a small one

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 8th, 2019, 10:16 am
by Pepper Pig
The Lidl version of Lurpak here but that’s in addition to proper butter, usually President.

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 8th, 2019, 10:24 am
by liketocook
I use the Tesco butterpak and find it spreads pretty well. Like a few folk on here I'm a solo household, I have butter in the fridge but find the spreadable stuff easier for a quick sandwich.

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 8th, 2019, 10:29 am
by Suelle
KC2 wrote:We use Lurpak, which is fine, haven't really tried any of the others. I remember we used to like Olivio in the dim and distant past!


I tried a spread containing olive oil recently, but not only did it contain palm oil, the exposed surface turned quite dark very quickly, and looked unpleasant.

If I have to resort to real butter, an insulated dish sounds ideal - my kitchen is too sunny to keep even a small amount of butter out for any length of time - I'd be constantly moving it to keep it out of the sun. It's bad enough keeping chocolate biscuits and de-frosting food in shady positions.

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 8th, 2019, 11:48 am
by northleedsbhoy
For spreadable butter I buy Kerrygold and it’s about the only one that is 100% butter with no added oil to make it softer. It’s sold in 250g tubs and the container is green, it’s slightly salted which is great for me and I use it for toast but like most it needs to be out the fridge for a few minutes. For sandwiches etc I use block butter - either Lurpak or President unsalted.

Cheers
NLB :tu:

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 8th, 2019, 11:57 am
by KC2
Suelle wrote:
I tried a spread containing olive oil recently, but not only did it contain palm oil, the exposed surface turned quite dark very quickly, and looked unpleasant.


:sprout: :sprout:

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 8th, 2019, 2:18 pm
by Ratatouille
I can't stand Lurpack or Anchor, too greasy. We rarely eat salted butter and I do as Suffs, keep a half pack of butter in my Jersey Cow butter dish so it is always spreadable. I use Charente Poitou for baking and everyday use and Isigny for "best". I keep a bit of salted butter in the freezer in small portions for making garlic butter and caramel.

I don't trust spreadable butter. It always has additives. If I want to use olive oil to spread I keep some in the fridge and it becomes thick enough to spread

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 8th, 2019, 9:16 pm
by WWordsworth
Lurpak spreadable hits the spot here.

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 8th, 2019, 10:17 pm
by wargarden
I just remembered whipping air into the butter will increase the spreadability.

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 9th, 2019, 4:46 am
by northleedsbhoy
Ratatouille wrote:I can't stand Lurpack or Anchor, too greasy. We rarely eat salted butter and I do as Suffs, keep a half pack of butter in my Jersey Cow butter dish so it is always spreadable. I use Charente Poitou for baking and everyday use and Isigny for "best". I keep a bit of salted butter in the freezer in small portions for making garlic butter and caramel.

I don't trust spreadable butter. It always has addatives. If I want to use olive oil to spread I keep some in the fridge and it becomes thick enough to spread


That's the reason I only buy Kerrygold spreadable as it's 100% butter with no added oils.

https://www.kerrygoldusa.com/products/n ... sh-butter/

Cheers
NLB :tu:

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 9th, 2019, 6:45 am
by earthmaiden
I remember having whipped butter in the USA which I have not seen here. Very light and fluffy but I don't know if it had additives. Wondering if that is the process they use to make spreadable butter with no additives.

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 9th, 2019, 2:55 pm
by wargarden
this recipe for whipped butter has two ingredients butter and milk
unless you count milk as bad additive it should work for the original poster
https://www.thespruceeats.com/homemade- ... ter-427820

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 10th, 2019, 7:42 am
by Herbidacious
You get whipped butter in Scandinavia. I have had it London. I thought it was going to become a trend but it didn't seem to take off.

I was about to run out of my Anchor so I thought I'd try a different one this time. They only had massive cartons of Country Life, so I bought some Kerrygold. At least it's a bit of a more natural colour. Seems to taste ok. Not a strong flavour but pleasant.

I really dislike unsalted butter. It's just too fatty?! :? In general, very fatty things make me feel nauseous (physiological not psychological. Various very fatty things made me feel sick as a child without my putting two and two together to work out what it was), but if consumed with something - salt or chilli - it seems to be ok. I do love salt crystal butter. I have a stash of it - various ones including an Isigny one and a Charente one - from my last trip to Normandy.
Best butter I've had was in a Parisian hotel. It was a Beurre de Baratte from down near Fougeres/Ernee, oddly (?)

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 10th, 2019, 9:00 am
by StokeySue
Salted butter has exactly the same fat content as unsalted, and melts at the same temperature, so any perceived greasiness or fattiness is probably just due to the lack of a contrasting salty tang. Flavour perception is weird.

My preference is for unsalted butter made with really sour cream, which is quite hard to come by in the UK

It’s perhaps worth pointing out that to my taste there’s very little correlation between the taste of the pure block butter and the same brand of spreadable, so you have to start tasting with a blank sheet.

I’d forgotten Kerrygold, as my local Morrison’s no longer stocks it. Used to get it from M&S. Quite similar to Country Lifee iirc

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 10th, 2019, 9:32 am
by Meganthemog
I only ever buy Green Meadow Welsh butter and it seems to always be spreadable - maybe because of its salt content. Sadly, unless you live in Wales you won't be able to buy it unless you go on-line. I don't like unsalted butter and can never understand when a recipe calls for unsalted butter and then adds salt. Our local market has several stalls where you can buy hand made local salted butter - in varying degrees of saltiness.
I never buy any sort of spread - proper butter or nothing in this house. We probably eat a pack a week between the 3 of us, on toast and of course on jacket potatoes :hungry: :hungry:

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 10th, 2019, 10:14 am
by KC2
Meganthemog wrote:I can never understand when a recipe calls for unsalted butter and then adds salt.


I agree!

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 10th, 2019, 10:15 am
by earthmaiden
I was taught that the point of using unsalted butter and then adding salt to a recipe was so that you could exactly control the amount of salt going into your finished dish. I have to be honest, that IMO, very few recipes require that amount of control but if I was cooking something very delicate and special I might. I think that unsalted butter on bread, scones etc can sometimes be nice when paired with sweet things.

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 10th, 2019, 10:45 am
by StokeySue
I think the other thing is that patissiers and bakers often only have unsalted butter as a staple ingredient, since there are some recipes where they wouldn’t want any salt, so it’s not about control for one recipe but across the board

Also, quite apart from the actual saltiness, salted butter tastes different to unsalted at least to me!

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 10th, 2019, 11:01 am
by miss mouse
StokeySue wrote:Also, quite apart from the actual saltiness, salted butter tastes different to unsalted at least to me!


And me. I am an unsalted butter eater, can't abide salted, isn't it lucky we have the choice.

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 10th, 2019, 12:49 pm
by Gruney
Did I read somewhere that it's better to fry with unsalted, as It burns less readily?

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 10th, 2019, 1:35 pm
by Seatallan
I love both I must admit. I've been known to eat President butter straight from the fridge when passing. :oops:

I usually have reduced-fat Clover for everyday use though Mr S has proper butter.

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 15th, 2019, 8:41 am
by PatsyMFagan
KC2 wrote:
Meganthemog wrote:I can never understand when a recipe calls for unsalted butter and then adds salt.


I agree!


me too (confused of Harefield ;) )

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 15th, 2019, 9:12 am
by suffolk
To me it’s obvious ... it means that I can add the amount of salt I want to ... for instance, I always use unsalted butter to make pastry, and add a tiny pinch of salt. Because we are used to eating a fairly low salt diet, using salted butter makes the pastry rather salty to my taste.

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 18th, 2019, 7:35 am
by PatsyMFagan
In the interests of er….. something ;) I bought both Kerrygold Softer Butter AND one called The Butter Works made with Hillfarm EVCP Rapeseed Oil - both 250g from WR and both are very tasty. I like the saltiness, but may sling the Kerrygold in the freezer now I have sampled it.

I am aware that some of you don't like rapeseed oil, but I do and the knowledge that it is a British product ;)

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 18th, 2019, 8:06 am
by miss mouse
PatsyMFagan wrote:I am aware that some of you don't like rapeseed oil, but I do and the knowledge that it is a British product


I am not keen on rapeseed oil though might not ID it mixed in butter. What concerns me is the industrial process involved to create the 'spreadables'. Remember the trans-fat disaster?

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 18th, 2019, 8:38 am
by StokeySue
I really don’t see that simple blending of butter, oil, and sometimes buttermilk is in any way comparable to catalytic hydrogenation

There might however be some concern about the use of deodorised and bleached rape seed oils, but I’ve been unable to find out exactly what the process is, or if it is even what is used

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 18th, 2019, 9:20 am
by suffolk
More to the point IMHO is the standard practice of spraying glyphosate on the ripe crop of oilseed rape in order to dry/desiccate it before harvesting.

I have stopped buying non organic rapeseed oil for that reason.

https://www.fwi.co.uk/arable/desiccatin ... lost-yield

https://www.monsanto-ag.co.uk/news/2016 ... siccation/

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 18th, 2019, 12:17 pm
by Badger's mate
the standard practice of spraying glyphosate on the ripe crop of oilseed rape in order to dry/desiccate it before harvesting


I think they do the same with cereals too. Plus of course anything 'Roundup ready' (soy for example) that we import. It just seems wrong to me to use a potential carcinogen directly on foodstuffs.

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 18th, 2019, 12:21 pm
by Badger's mate
On the subject of British produce, have you noticed that Anchor butter is now produced in Wiltshire? Apparently it stopped coming from New Zealand in 2012

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 18th, 2019, 12:49 pm
by StokeySue
Yes, there was quite a fuss at the time about Anchor

Still rubbish though - there W was something about the NZ version that just didn’t do it for me, and I don’t like the UK one any better

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 18th, 2019, 12:56 pm
by suffolk
Yes, wheat and barley is routinely sprayed with glyphosate prior to harvest to desiccate (reduce the moisture content) the crop. As most here know I’m from a farming family ... a young member of our family has recently been (thankfully successfully) treated for Hodgkin lymphoma ... which has been linked to glyphosate. We prefer to buy organic flour and baked products when we can.

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 18th, 2019, 1:07 pm
by earthmaiden
If you drive round Wiltshire you see farms with signs saying that their cows produce milk for Anchor - as you do with Cadburys too. I have never been particularly fond of Anchor. We had it when I was a child and I didn't like butter much until I was older and tried other brands.

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 18th, 2019, 4:27 pm
by miss mouse
suffolk wrote:a young member of our family has recently been (thankfully successfully) treated for Hodgkin lymphoma ... which has been linked to glyphosate.


I think it was 'More or less' or 'Inside health' which had a look at this, the figures are very shaky, also David Speigelhalter (SP?) had a look at the numbers and they are insignificant. What is more interesting is the super-weeds marching across the Canadian prairies. I am glad that your family member has made a good recovery.

StokeySue wrote:I really don’t see that simple blending of butter, oil, and sometimes buttermilk is in any way comparable to catalytic hydrogenation



I have no idea whether that is all that is done to it. The nation was urged to eat the hydrogenated stuff and give up 'nasty butter', Big Pharma and Big Food scored a winner there. Fortunately it was too expensive for me and I hated the taste anyway.

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 18th, 2019, 4:42 pm
by suffolk
I agree Miss Mouse ... glyphosate and Hodgkins have been linked but there is no scientific evidence. However I’m hoping not to add to the cases they can study ;)

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 18th, 2019, 4:51 pm
by miss mouse
suffolk wrote:I agree Miss Mouse ... glyphosate and Hodgkins have been linked but there is no scientific evidence. However I’m hoping not to add to the cases they can study ;)


Indeed not Suffs. What a worry it is.

Hang on, shouldn't you be dashing around frenziedly packing, bins sorted and out and generally muttering 'Never Again, Why Am I Doing This?'

Have a grand hol, That is a long drive from where you are, do you do it in a day? Wow.

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 18th, 2019, 6:39 pm
by suffolk
Thank you Miss Mouse :D Everything is packed and loaded with the exception of our overnight bags
We set off around 6 tomorrow morning and will be driving to the edge of Dartmoor (arriving mid afternoon) where we will stay overnight with gardening friends ... they will feed and water us and we’ll unstiffen our legs by wandering around their beautiful 9 acre garden (with a lake and two islands and a woodland) with a view across the valley to Dartmoor. Then we’ll sink into the comfiest bed in a glamorous bedroom and matching en-suite ... in the morning we’ll be fed a wonderful ‘full English’ and be sent on our way ... aren’t forum friends wonderful :luv:

Re: 'Spreadable' Butter

PostPosted: September 18th, 2019, 7:04 pm
by miss mouse
A dull and safe journey Suffs. Dull is good where travel is concerned. IMO. When was all the snow? was that last winter or the one before? Far too exciting for me, essential journeys.