lamb ham

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lamb ham

Postby wargarden » January 20th, 2020, 7:24 am

I was just curious if you can get
hams in UK made from mutton or lamb.
In USA hams of 1700-1840's where made from lamb and mutton.
there was place revving practice I read about 2 years ago.
just curious if anything like that can be acquired in UK.
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Re: lamb ham

Postby Pepper Pig » January 20th, 2020, 8:18 am

A foodie group I belong to went to Borough Market about ten years ago. There were lots of tastings and one of the things on offer was air dried lamb. We were all agreed that it was disgusting.

Although mutton has come back into fashion it’s mostly eaten here as a Halal meat.
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Re: lamb ham

Postby Badger's mate » January 20th, 2020, 8:27 am

I've not seen it over here. I've had 'reestit mutton' from Shetland, but that's much drier and smokier than ham. Have seen cured lamb in Iceland (the country rather than the frozen food supermarket).

ETA

Mutton is quite rare outside of Halal butchers and hogget is even more difficult to find. I would say that goat is much more freely available than either. A local sheep farmer regularly sells mutton and occasionally hogget.
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Re: lamb ham

Postby earthmaiden » January 20th, 2020, 8:32 am

Yes, possibly more popular in countries where lamb and mutton are the most popular meat. That said, lamb was the staple cheap meat in Australia until the late 20th century and I don't remember eating it as ham when we lived there. I imagine it takes on the more unpleasant lamb taste that you get with dishes made from cheaper cuts.
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Re: lamb ham

Postby suffolk » January 20th, 2020, 10:16 am

Smoked lamb is available from some specialist smokehouses/farm shops/delis
http://woodside-farm.com/

I’ve eaten it as part of a hors d’œuvres smoked platter
and I enjoyed it. However I think that good UK lamb is prized (and priced) as a premium product and producers have no need to ‘add value’ by curing it.
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Re: lamb ham

Postby Seatallan » January 20th, 2020, 12:23 pm

Badger's mate wrote:Mutton is quite rare outside of Halal butchers and hogget is even more difficult to find. I would say that goat is much more freely available than either. A local sheep farmer regularly sells mutton and occasionally hogget.


We can get hogget from local butchers fairly easily (and mutton). Seems to be more of a 'thing' up here. I love roast hogget. :hungry:
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Re: lamb ham

Postby Busybee » January 20th, 2020, 12:48 pm

Seatallan wrote:
Badger's mate wrote:Mutton is quite rare outside of Halal butchers and hogget is even more difficult to find. I would say that goat is much more freely available than either. A local sheep farmer regularly sells mutton and occasionally hogget.


We can get hogget from local butchers fairly easily (and mutton). Seems to be more of a 'thing' up here. I love roast hogget. :hungry:


Yes, hogget is easy to get up here too - maybe more of a northern thing? I hadn’t realised mutton and hogget were in short supply.

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Re: lamb ham

Postby suffolk » January 20th, 2020, 1:23 pm

We can get hogget around here https://www.salterandking.co.uk/collections/hogget

Not from every butcher, but it’s there if you search it out.
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Re: lamb ham

Postby WWordsworth » January 21st, 2020, 10:25 pm

Don't about lamb ham but I have enjoyed beef ham in Scotland.
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Re: lamb ham

Postby miss mouse » January 21st, 2020, 11:11 pm

WWordsworth wrote:Don't about lamb ham but I have enjoyed beef ham in Scotland.



Wouldn't this be the equivalent of jerky? I can't remember the South African name for it.
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Re: lamb ham

Postby karadekoolaid » January 21st, 2020, 11:31 pm

South Africa - biltong
USA - dried strips of beef, rather than "hammed", are called jerky.
I believe it was an American Indian method of conserving excess meat. Come to think of it, might it not be reindeer, or buffalo meat?
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Re: lamb ham

Postby miss mouse » January 21st, 2020, 11:47 pm

karadekoolaid wrote:South Africa - biltong
USA - dried strips of beef, rather than "hammed", are called jerky.
I believe it was an American Indian method of conserving excess meat. Come to think of it, might it not be reindeer, or buffalo meat?


Biltong, of course. Thanks.

Reindeer and buffalo seem very likely, presumably also the Sami people do this and the Mongolian herders.
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Re: lamb ham

Postby scullion » January 22nd, 2020, 8:57 am

Some people we were with last night had duck ham from the menu. I assumed it was just thinly sliced, cooked duck rather than a cured meat.
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Re: lamb ham

Postby suffolk » January 22nd, 2020, 8:59 am

I would assume it had been brined and smoked, Scully.
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Re: lamb ham

Postby liketocook » January 22nd, 2020, 10:39 am

miss mouse wrote:
WWordsworth wrote:Don't about lamb ham but I have enjoyed beef ham in Scotland.



Wouldn't this be the equivalent of jerky? I can't remember the South African name for it.

No it's very thinly sliced rounds of topside usually coated in a spice mix containing pepper, cinnamon, cloves and all spice which is flash fried and often served on toast or in a sandwich. It's lovely :drool: . Well worth trying if you are ever in Scotland , most butchers and some supermarkets stock it.
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Re: lamb ham

Postby miss mouse » January 22nd, 2020, 11:05 am

I am not fond of cinnamon, cloves OK in moderation and particularly good to chew in the case of toothache, Allspice is lovely though. It sounds V. Nice ltc, I am willing to give it a bash.
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Re: lamb ham

Postby liketocook » January 22nd, 2020, 11:14 am

miss mouse wrote:I am not fond of cinnamon, cloves OK in moderation and particularly good to chew in the case of toothache, Allspice is lovely though. It sounds V. Nice ltc, I am willing to give it a bash.

I think it's a cut only found in Scotland and you can buy it unspiced then add your own if you wish. I'm sure a traditional butcher would be able to slice topside for you if you fancied trying it. Just don't overcook it or it's like shoe leather.
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Re: lamb ham

Postby miss mouse » January 22nd, 2020, 11:27 am

We have so many interesting regional specialities which can be a surprise when we visit another area, I imagine Big Food hates that sort of thing.
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Re: lamb ham

Postby liketocook » January 22nd, 2020, 12:11 pm

miss mouse wrote:We have so many interesting regional specialities which can be a surprise when we visit another area, I imagine Big Food hates that sort of thing.

Aren't there just :D , which IMHO is no bad thing though many seem to be versions of the same dish known by different names. It would be a shame if that diversity got lost.
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Re: lamb ham

Postby Badger's mate » January 22nd, 2020, 12:50 pm

I suppose that salt beef and Pastrami are the more widely available bovine versions of ham. The former has long been around in the London area as a consequence of the Jewish diaspora and Pastrami is everywhere because of the US influence everywhere.
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Re: lamb ham

Postby suffolk » January 22nd, 2020, 12:57 pm

Both are a product of the Jewish disapora really, as pastrami is simply smoked salt beef ... the word pastrami comes via Yiddish ... apparently
https://www.etymonline.com/word/pastrami
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