Soup

Out of the main bustle of the Coffee shop this is where people gather to share recipes and tips/tricks.

Re: Soup

Postby Zosherooney » June 6th, 2012, 3:24 pm

I decided that yesterday was so cold and rainy that it would be soup for lunch - Mr Zosh is not (so he says) keen on any soups. What could I do to zap it up a bit. The stock was good quality so I made a satay soup with thin coloured pasta, some coconut dumplings, I had some shredded duck, cucumber, cubed red pepper and finely cut spring onions. It was delish - say so myself. Will make that again. :tu: :tu:
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Re: Soup

Postby spotteddick » July 16th, 2012, 10:05 pm

At the weekend I came in from work at about 13:00 and thought that it bwould be a long time to wait until Linda came down from Kiel so decided to do something light and quick. I knew I has some frozen prawns in the freezer (Aldi ones) so I decided on a Miso, prawn, noodle broth. Including the defrosting 20 minutes start to finish. Of course you have to have all the ingredients in the house, if you have to go to Kyoto, then it may be a few minutes longer.

here it is from my blog:
http://spotteddick-itsallinthegame.blog ... -then.html
Cheers

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Re: Soup

Postby frenchcheesequeen » July 16th, 2012, 10:40 pm

I boiled a piece of gammon yesterday and have two ice cream tubs of vegetable soup made with the stock. The next two days' lunches I think.
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Re: Soup

Postby ianinfrance » September 13th, 2012, 1:02 pm

I think it's rather a shame no one posts to this useful thread.

Anyway, the reason I'm writing here os to tell you about a soup (new to us) that we tried today. It's from the Eden Project, and we got a photocopy of it from my brother's copy of the Waitrose food illustrated magazine where it showed up in their "Trade secrets" section .

It's called "The Eden Project Moroccan tomato and chickpea soup".

We made it from scratch with 210g dried chickpeas (soaked overnight and pressure cooked 15 minutes) and our own tomatoes (600g blended and sieved), but the magazine version used a 410g tin of chickpeas and 500g passita. Delicious and well worth making.

You sweat a large onion and a large clove of garlic, both finely chopped, in a little olive oil for about 5 minutes until softened, without colouring, The you add a tsp of ground coriander, together with a large pinch each of mixed spice and ground chillies, stir and cook another 5 mins. Then you tip in the passita, the chick peas and about 1½ pts (or 850 mls) of light veg stock. Naturally I used the pea cooking liquor, flavoured up with veg stock powder. Bring to the boil and simmer for 30 minutes when you add 100g rice. When that is nicely tender, you add a tsp each of wine vinegar and sugar. The recipe called for white wine vinegar, I used my home made red wine vinegar. I finally seasoned with 1 tsp salt and about 10 grinds of fgbp.

Delicious.
Last edited by ianinfrance on September 13th, 2012, 1:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Soup

Postby suffolk » September 14th, 2012, 6:04 am

I think we're so glad to have had some summer weather at last that we've not been thinking along the lines of hot soup recently Ian, and there is another thread for cold soup.
However, from the way the weather's changing and the nights drawing in, I foresee lots of soup making happening very soon - at least in this house :chef:
Last edited by suffolk on September 14th, 2012, 6:05 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Soup

Postby spotteddick » September 14th, 2012, 6:26 am

Yes! Yes! soon be the wonderful tasty, game broths, soups and stews,time. I am doing a pigeon breast starter at the weekend for a dinner party and the remains will go into a nice consomme for Sunday lunch with leberknodel (liver dumplings).

Will give you the lowdown when I have made them.
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Re: Soup

Postby Mamta » September 14th, 2012, 6:36 am

This soup does sound tasty and filling, a complete meal. I would probably make it from scratch too, chickpeas taste much nicer cooked fresh and have a better texture. It is almost like a curry, isn't it, minus a few spices? I wonder how it will taste if you added a handful of fresh spinach leaves towards the end! Chickpeas and spinach do go well together.
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Re: Soup

Postby suffolk » September 14th, 2012, 7:20 am

Should there have been a link with that Mamta? :?
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Re: Soup

Postby sarebear1982 » September 14th, 2012, 7:32 am

I made a ice cream tub full of soup last night with the left over cooking liquer from the slow cooker, chicken and veg its was lovely when I tasted it it. Got it out of the fridge to fetch in to work and left it on the blummin dog cage.

But yes I will be making soups and stocking the freezer for tasty warming lunches for these cold days that appear to be here!
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Re: Soup

Postby spotteddick » September 14th, 2012, 8:20 am

Hi Suffs, I think the refernce was to Ians soup
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Re: Soup

Postby ianinfrance » September 14th, 2012, 8:43 am

Mamta wrote:It is almost like a curry, isn't it, minus a few spices?


In a sense, I suppose so, but much of Middle Eastern and North African food could be described like that, couldn't it? When I tasted it, it doesn't make me think of an "indian soup without" really.

Mamta wrote:I wonder how it will taste if you added a handful of fresh spinach leaves towards the end!

That is an excellent idea, especially cut into a chiffonade. Would also work with swiss chard leaves.

It's definitely going to become part of our repertory of soups. I must write to my brother and tell him we finally got round to making it.

What I found interesting was how fast the chick peas cooked in the pressure cooker after being soaked overnight. Normally one reckons that you can boil them for an age and they never get that tender, but I'd bought giant chickpeas, and so reckoned that they would need slightly more cooking time. I gave them 25 minutes and they were arguably a tiny touch overcooked, to be honest. Not in any way serious of course.

Hooray for soup!
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Re: Soup

Postby suffolk » September 14th, 2012, 10:13 am

:oops: Of course, thanks Dick :D
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Re: Soup

Postby spotteddick » September 14th, 2012, 10:19 am

I was looking at "Wor Mams" pea and ham soup recipe last night (was looking for something else but came upon that one), it is certainly an old favorite in our house, it was that thick you could stick your spoon up in it and when it set, you could use it instead of mortar, but boy did it taste good, you can thin it down with plain water and it will last the whole week.
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Re: Soup

Postby Mamta » September 14th, 2012, 2:03 pm

Should there have been a link with that Mamta? :?

Link to what suffolk?
What I found interesting was how fast the chick peas cooked in the pressure cooker after being soaked overnight. Normally one reckons that you can boil them for an age and they never get that tender, but I'd bought giant chickpeas, and so reckoned that they would need slightly more cooking time. I gave them 25 minutes and they were arguably a tiny touch overcooked, to be honest. Not in any way serious of course.

Yes indeed, soaked chickpeas do cook quite fast in a pressure cooker. the amounts I usually cook at a time (I always freeze some), I will have to buy catering size tins and they won't taste half as nice!
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Re: Soup

Postby StokeySue » September 14th, 2012, 3:42 pm

ianinfrance wrote:What I found interesting was how fast the chick peas cooked in the pressure cooker after being soaked overnight. Normally one reckons that you can boil them for an age and they never get that tender, but I'd bought giant chickpeas, and so reckoned that they would need slightly more cooking time. I gave them 25 minutes and they were arguably a tiny touch overcooked, to be honest. Not in any way serious of course.


My experience is that the large pale chickpeas actually cook quickest - I think they are a slightly different variety to the tough little ones

Also it's September - I think they are harvested in the Northrn Hempisphere in July & August so you might just have been lucky enough to get new season ones, which I'd also expect to be a tad more tender

ianinfrance wrote:Mamta wrote:
It is almost like a curry, isn't it, minus a few spices?

In a sense, I suppose so, but much of Middle Eastern and North African food could be described like that, couldn't it? When I tasted it, it doesn't make me think of an "indian soup without" really.


I keep pointing out to people on boards who think they have got their tagine wrong that most Maghrebi food is nowhere near as spicy as Indian food - a lot of it is no spicier than a Newmarket sausage or some other British bangers or faggots althogu spices are put in. Some of it even less so.
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Re: Soup

Postby Mamta » September 15th, 2012, 6:40 am

I keep pointing out to people on boards who think they have got their tagine wrong that most Maghrebi food is nowhere near as spicy as Indian food

All Indian food is not spicy, many people (like my mum), especially in states like Uttaranchal, cook a lot of their everyday food with minimum spices like cumin, turmeric and coriander alone, omitting out things like chillies, black peppers and garam masala altogether. Tomatoes are used when season, but not always. Onions are also optional.
The chickpeas that we use here most of the time, the white bones, were not easily available in India in my childhood. They were called Kabuli Chana, because most of it was probably imported from Kabul-Afghanistan and probably middle east, via Kabul. It is probable that the recipes for it also came from there. Though I do not know that much about it, whenever I have eaten middle eastern food on our travels, it has always reminded me very much of Indian food, in a milder form.
The native Indian chickpea is Bengal gram, which is unfortunately not used as much in India these days. It is lovely by the way.
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Re: Soup

Postby karinamaria » September 15th, 2012, 7:38 am

I have just discovered this thread. I love to make soup and my husband ( the mushroom brusher ! ) loves to eat it.

In a local village to us ( Dondas, France ) they run a soup competition every November. Last year there were 92 entrants. 2 categories, French soup and International soup , each entrant makes at least 5 litres of soup, delivered to the venue in the morning. Their are 5 international judges who blind taste all the soups !!!. After the judging and prizegiving a meal begins ( 170 people last year ) starting with a buffet of all the soups. A wonderful experiance of flavours ! followed by a served main course, cheese and dessert ( washed down with lots of wine )

Last year my Minestrone Soup ( my Grandmothers recipe ) came second in the International category. I was rather proud !. I am entering again this year, so is Hubbie. I have about 20 soups to make and try out, but would really like all your input for tasty out standing soups ( for either category ). I am staying away from French Onion and wild mushroom, as there were so many of those last year, also pumpin, but am open to unusual Pumpin soup ?

Thanks in advance
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Re: Soup

Postby suffolk » September 15th, 2012, 8:20 am

I made this last year - it was delicious http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/ ... .shopping5

Another soup I make with squashes and pumpkins is to roast chunks of squash and some sage leaves around a roasting chicken. When we've eaten some chicken and squash for dinner, I make a stock with the chicken bones etc, and use this and the rest of the roasted squash and sage leaves to make a soup. The flavours go really well together.

I soften an onion with some lardons and chopped celery and then add the chopped roasted squash and sage leaves and simmer until soft and then put it through the liquidiser, et voilà. ;)

Sometimes I'll add some grated parmesan towards the end of cooking the soup and a swirl of cream to finish.

At other times I add some spices when adding the chopped squash to the pan, maybe some cardamom or cumin.

Another variation is to roast the chicken and squash with rosemary and thyme instead of sage. If I do this I add a little chopped chilli to the pan when softening the onion.

I hope that's given you some ideas to play with - good luck :D
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Re: Soup

Postby spotteddick » September 16th, 2012, 10:25 pm

My Leberknodel (liver dumplings) in a
I made a pigeon breast starter for a dinner party on Saturday evening, this threw up 6 carcasses, these I browned in the oven with a chopped onion and some herbs, then into a pan with dried root vegetables a browned onion studded with bay leaf and clove, a few herbs, top off with a few litres of vegetable stock (marigold). bring to the boil and skim, simmer for a good 1.5 hrs, pour through a sieve and reduce, allow to cool over night. Next day add the pigeon legs and poach until cooked. Make your dumplings, I also used a piece of calfs liver as I was making 8 dumplings. Soak 4 slices of bread in some of the stock, squeeze out the excess and dice, dice the liver and puree with a puree wand, add the bread and puree as well, chop some rosemary and thyme add this to the mixture, add panko crumbs until you have a mixture that you can form into balls.
Add some chopped fresh cepes to the soup and then poach the dumplings, when they rise to the surface they are cooked.

This was putting the carcasses and the liver to a perfect use :tu: :chops:
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Re: Soup

Postby spotteddick » September 18th, 2012, 6:55 pm

Here is a link to my blog and the Leberknödel soup:
http://spotteddick-itsallinthegame.blog ... lings.html

It did turn out very nice a deep gamey soup with hearty liver dumplings
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Re: Soup

Postby anneskitchen » September 20th, 2012, 9:48 pm

I made broccoli and pesto again the other day, was teaching one of our ex-students (and now good friend!) how to make it and bread. Was delicious and great way to use pesto up! :tu:
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Re: Soup

Postby tezza » September 21st, 2012, 9:02 am

anneskitchen wrote:I made broccoli and pesto again the other day


Do you have a link to the recipe please? :D
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Re: Soup

Postby anneskitchen » September 21st, 2012, 9:11 am

tezza wrote:
anneskitchen wrote:I made broccoli and pesto again the other day


Do you have a link to the recipe please? :D


I've not written it down in full but roughly from memory:

Take one head of broccoli, seperate stalks from florets and finely chop them. Roughly quarter the florets

Soften an onion and a little garlic in olive oil and butter, add the stalks and cook for about 5 minutes, add a little liquid if getting dry, add the florets and vegetable stock (I use knorr pots) up to just below the surface of the florets, bring to boil and then cover and simmer for 15 minutes, stir in a heaped tsp of green pesto (or more to taste, I like to err on the side of caution!) and blitz with a stick blender, or liquidise if you prefer smoother texture. That's it! Serve in bowls and top with a little of the pesto and a few shredded basil leaves. There's a piccie of it on my facebook wall https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid ... tif_t=like

Enjoy! x
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Re: Soup

Postby tezza » September 21st, 2012, 9:18 am

That sounds really good, thank you! I think I will make some for my mum. :D
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Re: Soup

Postby spotteddick » October 21st, 2012, 2:26 pm

We had our Autumn menu at our cookery club on saturday and I elected to do the soup, it was Roasted tomato, paprika and brown shrimp. I have posted on my blog and it is easy to make even if a bit time consuming, though you din't have to make your own stock you can buy shrimp paste and do it that way but I enjoy my own stocks.

So here it is:

http://spotteddick-itsallinthegame.blog ... hrimp.html
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Re: Soup

Postby Seatallan » October 21st, 2012, 2:31 pm

It looks absolutely wonderful l! I could just eat a big bowl of that.

I have to confess that I had to suppress a shudder, though, at the part where you have to shell the shrimps. It's one of those kitchen jobs I'll do just about anything to avoid. It's such a faff with shrimps because they're so small. Last time I did it (for potted shrimps) I decided life was too short to ever do so again :D
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Re: Soup

Postby suffolk » October 21st, 2012, 5:16 pm

Looks fabulous Dick :hungry:

I'm perfectly happy to shell shrimps - my problem is that I always have to buy at least double the quantity stated because for some reason they disappear :oops:
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Re: Soup

Postby Catherine » October 21st, 2012, 6:23 pm

Oh yum Dick, that looks so good. :chops:
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Re: Soup

Postby ianinfrance » December 2nd, 2012, 6:19 pm

We made a new soup (to us) the other day, based on one from the excellent Lindsey Bareham book "A Celebration of Soup".

The original recipe called for toasted bacon sarnies as an accompaniment, but I changed that slightly.

She says it should be made with the stock left from poaching gammon and so that's why we did it.

Sweat up leek and potato in a little butter (bacon fat would also be good). When par-cooked, add peas and about 3 pints of ham stock. Bring to the boil and simmer till well tender, which doesn't take long. Season, and blend well. Correct seasoning. As I said, in her original recipe she served toasted mini bacon sarnies. I didn't want to do that, so I took an idea from a potato soup recipe by Bruce Poole ("Chez Bruce") which was to blob in some grain mustard flavoured whipped cream. He also used some fried black pudding slices. I wanted to play on the bacon theme, so I baked a few rashers in the oven pressed between bakewell sheets (roasting tin of course). When they were crisp, I cut them into about 4 pieces and arranged them delicately over the whipped cream. Though I say it myself, it was triumphantly good.
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Re: Soup

Postby suffolk » December 2nd, 2012, 6:23 pm

:drool: :chops:
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Re: Soup

Postby ianinfrance » December 2nd, 2012, 8:58 pm

Thanks suffolk.

Actually, I ought perhaps mention the Bruce Poole soup too. Her calls it "Potato Soup with black pudding, grain mustard chantilly and chives". And that's pretty well what it is!

Very simple, to be honest. Floury potatoes cut in 4cm dice cooked in water. I did a Heston trick which is to wash the spuds thoroughly before peeling them, then boiling the peelings in the water I am going to cook in for about 20 mins and then cooking the spuds in that after straining. He cooks a clove of garlic with them. When I first made it, I felt the garlic was too predominant, but when we actually came to serve it, it had calmed down and was perfect. You then blend in a liquidiser - not working too much, to avoid developing the gluten.

Fry 1 cm thick slices of black pudding, whip the cream season and fold in mustard (his recipe uses FAR too much cream at 200 ml for 6) and chop chives.

An excellent soup and one I'll make again - as I will the pea soup.
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Re: Soup

Postby frenchcheesequeen » December 3rd, 2012, 8:09 am

I am feeling grotty at the moment and since I had poached a chicken for the cat simply in water on Saturday I used the stock to make some Jewish Penicillin soup. I simply skimmed off the fat and then added a nice fat leek cut into rounds and a carrot finely diced. A generous pinch of Maldon salt completed the ingredients and it was the most delicious soup I have ever tasted. Fait Simple as someone once said.
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Re: Soup

Postby MagicMarmite » December 3rd, 2012, 12:42 pm

I made french onion soup on Saturday so I could use my new soup bowls.
It was Delia's recipe.
http://wheezeliketoeat.blogspot.co.uk/2012/12/french-onion-soup.html
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Re: Soup

Postby Catherine » December 3rd, 2012, 10:19 pm

I love those soup tureens MagicMarmite
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Re: Soup

Postby Riocaz » December 4th, 2012, 1:17 am

Me too! I bought a set for mum and Dad in the same colour a year or two back. Dad use them for tea and coffee because his tremor makes it difficult to hold a single handled cup. Andsimilarly for soup as a spoon just doesn't work for him!
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Re: Soup

Postby MagicMarmite » December 4th, 2012, 12:52 pm

Lovely aren't they?
I've had my eye on them for ages. Planning individual casseroles of some sort in them next week.
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Re: Soup

Postby sassy » December 4th, 2012, 6:04 pm

Scotch Broth..

My somewhat elderly mother makes this with flank mutton, carrots, swede, pearl barley and some big peas! And it is so good. Try as I might I can never replicate how she makes it. Can't ask her for the recipe - she ' just makes it' lol. And at this time of year with the cold weather it is just right :)
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Re: Soup

Postby suffolk » December 4th, 2012, 8:12 pm

Oh that sounds lovely Sassy - I make something similar with middle neck of lamb - problem is I still make enough for a family and there's only two of us to eat it :oops:
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Re: Soup

Postby Riocaz » December 6th, 2012, 4:07 pm

:chops: :chops: :chops: And I bet it still disappears in record time Suffs! :chops: :chops: :chops:
Last edited by Riocaz on December 6th, 2012, 4:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Soup

Postby frenchcheesequeen » December 6th, 2012, 4:12 pm

I am now craving barley broth.
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Re: Soup

Postby suffolk » December 7th, 2012, 5:56 am

Riocaz wrote::chops: :chops: :chops: And I bet it still disappears in record time Suffs! :chops: :chops: :chops:


That is the nub of the problem Lee :oops:
“One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.”
― Virginia Woolf
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Re: Soup

Postby spotteddick » December 7th, 2012, 7:44 am

I will be making a Scotch broth when in Nor'n Ir'n for Bob, he just loves those old hearty soups, broths and stews. I always use scrag end for mine and barley is a must, I know that some of the Clan put oatmeal in it as a thickener, but I don't, I find it is ample thick if left to simmer on a low fire for 2 to 3 days, it takes on a rich peaty flavour :lol:. I do believe this is what the three Mcbeth lassies were cooking up. ;)
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Re: Soup

Postby frenchcheesequeen » December 12th, 2012, 9:31 am

The other day Tesco sent me a little book of "personal" vouchers, one of which was 50p off a bag of parsnips so I bought a 750g bag of value parsnips for 75p and with the voucher ended up paying 25p for them. The parsnips were a bit fiddley because they are all quite long and thin, but absolutely packed with flavour. I have retained two of the parsnips (which I will turn into parsnip crisps to garnish) and the rest have been cooked in a tablespoon of oil with a couple of teaspoons of cumin and a large chopped onion. Once all nicely brown I covered with water and added a tablespoon of Marigold powder. Cooked for about ten minutes and then blitzed in the liquidizer I have one and a half litres of absolutely delicious soup. I reckon to have six decent portions of soup which will work out at around 15p per person per portion.
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Re: Soup

Postby spotteddick » December 12th, 2012, 2:55 pm

I made a game broth with the game bones left over from the weekend on Monday and had it Monday night after the shoot, I also had it last night after my fast day, I shall be having a plate tonight as I think it was jolly nice, just a soup mix (Tesco) soaked overnight, then next day chopped 2 onions, diced a carrot, a piece of celeriac, 2 large potatoes, chopped a leek into rings and crushed a clove of garlic, chipped the game bones into managable pieces, put those into the pot of a pressure cooker, softened the vegetables and added these, strained the soup mix and added this. Crushed some juniper berries, a piece of cinamon bark, mixed pepper corns, cloves, pimento and a couple of cardamom pods in a mortar, put these in a tea egg and put this in with the rest of the ingredients. Webnt out onto my balcony and got 2 bay leaves, 3 sage leaves, a sprig each of rosemary, thyme and oregano, bound these together and in this went, boiled a kettle and made a couple of litres of marigold stock, poured this over the whole lot, topped up until it was covered with water, lid on and 1 hour later a fantastic Broth, eaten with a fresh Sour dough loaf chunk, it was luverly ;) I will have to freeze the rest as I am going to make a curried parsnip and mushroom soup tonight for the remaining 2 days before we leave for the UK.
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Re: Soup

Postby Monnikka » December 28th, 2012, 2:30 pm

Today I made some celery soup using half a large celery that was surplus to requirements, two onions, a can of cannelini beans to thicken and enrich and a handful of finely chopped parsley and chives.

This was all gently stewed down in butter, a pint of stock added and blitzed. It smells divine and tastes gorgeous. I shall give it a squeeze of lemon juice to serve.

Now what can I do with the other half a celery head?
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Re: Soup

Postby ianinfrance » December 28th, 2012, 5:39 pm

Braise it?
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Re: Soup

Postby PatsyMFagan » December 28th, 2012, 7:10 pm

On one of the endless Christmas themed programmes on FoodNetwork, some (unknown to me) cook made a cauliflower soup. Nothing unusual I know, but it did look nice - cauliflower, sliced potatoes and onion cooked together in veg stock, then some parmesan stirred through (and maybe Stilton too?) - blitzed and served garnished with caramelised onions....yum
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Re: Soup

Postby Mamta » December 28th, 2012, 7:37 pm

On one of the endless Christmas themed programmes on FoodNetwork, some (unknown to me) cook made a cauliflower soup. Nothing unusual I know, but it did look nice - cauliflower, sliced potatoes and onion cooked together in veg stock, then some parmesan stirred through (and maybe Stilton too?) - blitzed and served garnished with caramelised onions....yum

It is nice, I make it sometimes. I add any blue or mature cheese that I have at the time, it is great! I haven't served it with caramelised onions, but a great idea :tu: !
Last edited by Mamta on December 29th, 2012, 4:42 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Soup

Postby spotteddick » December 29th, 2012, 8:14 am

I made a big pot of goose broth with the remanents of the Christmas Goose, nothing out of the ordinary, it is a broth that was on every stove in the miners back to backs in the village where I was born. It was made with the carcasse of the Christmas bird, the pork shank or what ever had been the meat of Christmas.

I had already made a stockpot with chicken wings and veg and any off cuts and peelings that arose from the Christmas dinner, this I used for, sauces and gravies for the Christmas dinner and the curry for boxing day. The remainder was used as the base of the new stock.
The goose carcasse including any skin and fat into a large pan (borrowed from friends)
add the remainder of the
1 onion roughly chopped
1 carrot roughly chopped
1 leek roughly chopped
2 stalkes of celery sliced (in germany I would have used süppengrün this always contains a slice of celeriac)
2 large cloves of garlic crushed
1 large root of parsnip
3 cloves
1 bay leaf
5 cloves
10 pepper corns
1 sprig each of fresh rosemary, thyme and sage


Bring to the boil and skim, simmer for a good few hours (mine simmered for about 6) allow to cool, this was done overnight in my case, skim the fat that has risen to the top, then remove the carcasse (it will now have become just a pile of blanched bones) and strain through a seive or collander, pick over the residue (some nice meaty morsels in amongst the mushy veg) now squeeze the last bit of tasty goodness out of the remainder, with the back of a spoon (I actually crushed the residue with a potato masher and poured boilng water over this repeating the procedure to get the last bit of goodness out of it.
Now add
2 vegetable stock cubes (or better still 2 tsp of Marigold stock powder)
250g of scotch broth mix (barley, peas, lentils etc) soaked over night in plenty of water) boil until almost soft then add fresh chopped veg, top up with water (same as before but this time don't cook to a mush). Adjust seasoning and serve with wheaten bread (well we did).
This is one hell of a broth and in my childhood and youth, when ever entering one of the miners 2 up 2 downs you would be greeted with, "sit ya sel doon hinney,A'll gi yi a playt o' broth" Happy days :chops:. The Broth pot was replenished at regular intervals with what ever came to hand, but it was like the mining communities, simple, but heart warming and so full of love and kindness.
Last edited by spotteddick on December 29th, 2012, 8:24 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Soup

Postby suffolk » December 29th, 2012, 8:18 am

That's what we had for supper yesterday Dick, except ours was made with the stock from the Christmas gammon - it was delicious and very filling. :D

Today I'll be making a chicken stock for a chicken and leek soup next week :D
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