Dartmouth Pie ... what is it?

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Dartmouth Pie ... what is it?

Postby suffolk » October 7th, 2017, 10:25 am

A regular on the GW forum is making a Dartmouth Pie ... I've never met one so asked Mr Google who came up with various recipes ... some double crusted, some with just a top crust, some made with mutton and suet, some made with pork and apple, and various other fillings.

Do you know what a Dartmouth Pie is, have you ever made one and do you have a recipe?

PS ... I have asked the GW member, but I think she's busy in her kitchen now ..............
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Re: Dartmouth Pie ... what is it?

Postby Suelle » October 7th, 2017, 6:03 pm

I have Mary Norwak's book 'English Puddings' and a book called 'The Book of Old Tarts'; both books deal with historical tarts, puddings and pies, but neither of them mentions a Dartmouth Pie.

I guess you have to choose the source that looks the most reliable! Possibly Jane Grigson's 'English Food'.
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Re: Dartmouth Pie ... what is it?

Postby suffolk » October 7th, 2017, 6:26 pm

She's come back to me with the recipe which she says she took from The Observer, probably in the 80s

Dartmouth Pie

This recipe was developed by Joyce Molyneux who owns the Carved Angel restaurant in Dartmouth, Devon which gives its name to the pie. It is very mediaeval in its combination of meat, dried fruit and spices. It is wonderful in winter and makes a great buffet dish for a party.

The meat should be cooked at least one day before the pie is needed so that the flavours can develop. The pastry top is then added on the day the dish is required.

1 kilo beef carbonade, stewing mutton (not lamb) or venison
2 tsp black peppercorns
1 blade whole mace or a good grinding of fresh nutmeg
1 tsp whole allspice berries
5cm stick whole cinnamon
2 tsp coriander seeds
oil to brown the meat - grapeseed, safflower, sunflower - not olive
½ kilo onions, peeled and chopped
½ litre beef or mutton or game stock

150 g dried apricots
150 g pitted prunes
120 g raisins
juice and grated zest of 1 large orange
shortcrust or puff pastry to cover
1 egg, beaten

Cut the meat into 3 cms cubes. Grind all the spices to a powder. Heat some oil in a large frying pan. Brown the meat, a few pieces at a time, sprinkling each batch with spice powder. Transfer to a casserole. Add the onions to the frying pan and stir well. Pour in the stock and bring to the boil.

Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 150C. Add the fruit and orange juice and zest to the meat in the casserole and stir well. When ready, add the stock, stir well then cover tightly and cook in the oven for 1½ - 2 hours. Check seasoning, adding salt if required. If the mixture seems too wet, either thicken the sauce with cornflour (fécule de maïs) or reduce by cooking a little longer without the lid according to your preference. Leave to cool overnight in the oven. At this stage, the meat mixture can be frozen. Thaw overnight then bring to room temperature before completing the dish

To complete:-

Heat oven to 200C.

Transfer the cold meat mixture to an ovenproof dish. Roll out the pastry to a thickness of about 3mms. Place a 2cm wide strip of pastry around the edges of the dish and brush with water. Cover with the remaining pastry which should be slashed once or twice to allow steam to escape. Decorate with pastry trimmings and brush with the beaten egg.

Cook for 30 minutes then reduce the temperature to 180C and cook 20 minutes more.

Serve immediately with lightly steamed Savoy cabbage or broccoli or a simple green salad.


The Carved Angel in its heyday ... before John Burton Race bought it ..............
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Re: Dartmouth Pie ... what is it?

Postby Suelle » October 7th, 2017, 7:12 pm

It lloks very much like the Grigson recipe, which uses lamb or venison. Sounds delicious!
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Re: Dartmouth Pie ... what is it?

Postby KC2 » October 7th, 2017, 7:54 pm

Looks delicious :hungry:
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Re: Dartmouth Pie ... what is it?

Postby Seatallan » October 8th, 2017, 12:02 pm

:chops: :chops: :chops:

If only Mr S did fruit...
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Re: Dartmouth Pie ... what is it?

Postby earthmaiden » October 8th, 2017, 1:48 pm

That looks wonderful ... do you think it needs salt?
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Re: Dartmouth Pie ... what is it?

Postby suffolk » October 8th, 2017, 5:09 pm

earthmaiden wrote:That looks wonderful ... do you think it needs salt?


I suppose it depends on the stock ... but I'd always check and add according to my taste, whether the recipe included it or not.
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