Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Order yourself a latte, and a pastry (The virtual cinnamon buns are excellent today). And have a nice chat.

Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby earthmaiden » February 20th, 2015, 2:27 pm

That is interesting Mrs W. I always used to make my own yogurt and did add milk powder, but always had a certain amount of whey. I like the sound of your new gadget!
The Masha sounds good too, what a wonderful thing for someone who really needs it such as Steve's aunt.
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby Herbidacious » July 16th, 2015, 9:22 am

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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby suffolk » July 16th, 2015, 9:45 am

:shock: :? :? :?

But they know it's useless - they tell you how to dispose of it at the bottom of the page :lol:
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby Pepper Pig » July 16th, 2015, 10:16 am

:) :D :lol:

Talking of useless gadgets . . . .

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle ... oly-affair
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby earthmaiden » July 16th, 2015, 10:21 am

:lol: :lol: nice one Suffs!

It says it is easy to put together and needs virtually no washing up. I wonder where all the burger fat goes then. The same place as the cheese fat from a toasted sandwich maker I suspect. I'd love to see one in action and can think of circumstances where it might be really useful - but think if I had one it would go where my microwave egg cooker went ... 8-)
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby earthmaiden » July 16th, 2015, 10:23 am

:lol: :lol: :lol: PP!
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby Herbidacious » July 16th, 2015, 10:29 am

is that one doing the FB rounds, Pepper Pig? I have had two people send it to me by email!

I haven't had a proper look at the catalogue yet but I need to go to Bromley at the weekend anyway... :D Although it is getting to the point where it's hard to find anything I want.

I was in Dille and Kamille on Uschi's recommendation last Saturday. Now there is kitchen heaven...http://www.dille-kamille.nl/nl/
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby MrsWWoof » July 16th, 2015, 2:44 pm

Still using my yoghurt maker on a regular basis :-)
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby suffolk » September 11th, 2019, 7:00 am

Revisiting this thread (brings back some memories) to see if anyone has tried the new version of the Lakeland yoghurt maker https://www.lakeland.co.uk/AllProductRe ... se%20Maker

OH has developed a real yoghurt ‘habit’ and we’ve doubled our consumption from one large pot of Greek style yog a week to at least two ... more if I’m cooking with it too ... and apart from anything else that’s an awful lot of plastic pots ...
We like soft cheese too so that’s another reason ... and I can use the whey for scones and bread instead of buying buttermilk ... many moons ago in another life I had what I think was the first Lakeland yoghurt maker and that was fine ... if no one has any gripes about the new one I’ll put it on my list for when we get back from our hols.
Last edited by suffolk on September 11th, 2019, 7:01 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby StokeySue » September 11th, 2019, 7:06 am

I have started making yogurt again but decided to get a vacuum jar rather than the electrical route.

Seems to work well, but I’ve been having trouble finding a suitable starter culture, someone on another forum suggested Total but I won’t try that until next week
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby suffolk » September 11th, 2019, 7:14 am

All the online reviews and a few other forums I’ve checked seem to recommend Yeo Valley with a long Use by date
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby StokeySue » September 11th, 2019, 7:37 am

I’ve been using Yeo Valley

Not impressed, no oomph
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby suffolk » September 11th, 2019, 8:10 am

Hmmm ... have you noticed any difference with the use by dates?

Maybe it needs the constant warmth of an electrical thingummy?
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby Ratatouille » September 11th, 2019, 8:36 am

My ancient electric yogurt maker makes 9 jars. I have never had any problem just keeping back one jar to start the next batch but if there is a break and I need to start a fresh batch I use a jar from the lady in the market who sells her own butter, cheese and yogurt.
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby StokeySue » September 11th, 2019, 9:06 am

suffolk wrote:Hmmm ... have you noticed any difference with the use by dates?

Maybe it needs the constant warmth of an electrical thingummy?

Yes, of course I checked use by dates

And I checked the temperature of the mix several times using an accurate probe thermometer, the little bacteria were at a nice cosy temperature throughout, there’s no reason to suppose using a heater would have made any difference

I don’t even like Yeo Valley that much, it’s a fairly uninteresting yogurt, but one of the few available live in small pots these days, so next time I’ll try Total

I did do microbiology 101 (a long time ago)! :D
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby cyprusmoira » September 11th, 2019, 9:34 am

Sue, maybe the little ethnic food shops in your part of London sell different brands of yoghurt to be used as starter. Turkish yoghurt is similar to Greek but don't tell anyone.
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby suffolk » September 11th, 2019, 9:36 am

I thought you (of all people) would’ve checked ... that’s why I asked ... just wondered whether you’d noticed a difference given the assurances on other forums that other folk have found there to be a noticeable difference ... they may not have been micro-biologists of course :D
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby Seatallan » September 11th, 2019, 12:18 pm

Gosh, a blast from the past! Nice to be reminded of Teri.... :luv:

Wish I'd not had to leave the ransoms she gave me in the old garden. Still, I'm sure the new residents will enjoy them.
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby StokeySue » September 11th, 2019, 12:56 pm

I am looking at the Turkish shops, but unfortunately the good yogurts are mainly sold in 1kg tubs, which is a bit awkward. The reason I started with Yeo was it was the only unflavoured yogurt available in little pots

The batch I have is ok, but not as good as I’d like.
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby suffolk » September 11th, 2019, 1:47 pm

This is one of the forums I’ve been looking at where the consensus seems to be that Yeo works

https://club.omlet.co.uk/forum/topic/53 ... lk-yogurt/

They give several interesting tips arising from their own experiences.
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby Herbidacious » September 11th, 2019, 2:04 pm

I was about to throw out my Easyyo. I have a French soft cheese maker (um, or two). Not used it for ages. A good reminder.
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby StokeySue » September 11th, 2019, 2:33 pm

Thanks Suffolk, but nothing I didn’t know
I’ve done some without milk powder and some with
The texture is different, but the flavour is much the same

There has been lactic fermentation, but it’s slow and the end result is acidic but not well flavoured imo, when I made yogurt before using Danone as a starter it was much better.

But as I said, I don’t really like Yeo Valley yogurt much to start with
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby suffolk » September 11th, 2019, 3:28 pm

I’m sure ... but given that I asked for folk’s experiences of the Lakeland yoghurt makers and seeing that no one appears to have any I thought I’d post what I’ve found :)

This is another forum I found which suggests Onken as an alternative to Total and Yeo.

https://cleverguts.com/forums/topic/which-live-yoghurt/

Edited to add missing link.
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby StokeySue » September 11th, 2019, 4:12 pm

Yes, Onken is one I think I used before
Again, doesn’t come in small sizes (or not locally)
But, unless you like the Yeo finding a starter is going to be an issue
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby earthmaiden » September 11th, 2019, 4:18 pm

In the back of my mind I thought that Lakeland did sachets of culture to go with their yogurt makers. Reading the reviews, someone does mention it and they are on the website. Has anyone tried this? You surely should only need it once and then your own yogurt would be the starter for the next batch - or am I missing something? I used to make our own in the 70's using a thermos flask and starter just kept aside from the previous batch. We even made it like that for our whole food cafe. I think such methods would be considered sure to kill us these days ;).
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby StokeySue » September 11th, 2019, 4:50 pm

Ooh well done earthmaiden - I’d no idea that existed! Made by a firm called Mad Millie who do all sorts of interesting cultures (kefir, sourdoughetc.) and vegetarian rennet
It may we’ll be a better culture as I see it has 4 different friendly :wave: bacteria in it whereas most commercial yogurts only claim 2

https://www.madmillie.com/
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby suffolk » September 11th, 2019, 5:24 pm

Yes Lakeland have always sold packs of yoghurt culture. I assumed SSue didn’t like it or would’ve been using it. The pros and cons of the ‘bought culture’ as opposed to a dollop of bought yoghurt were mentioned on the first page of this thread.
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby StokeySue » September 11th, 2019, 6:14 pm

Well always is a relative term - they certainly didn’t sell culture when they sold me a yogurt maker in ca 1992 and I hadn’t noticed them since
Mine was the Moulinex 6 pot one, it was good, but I always said if I replaced it I’d get a single big pot, as I don’t necessarily want to use it in 150ml portions and it involved a bit of faffing around compared to a single unit

I am intrigued to note that Mad Millie, like easiyo is from New Zealand, what’s going on down there (actually I worked with several people from NZ whose original qualifications were obtained in dairy labs)
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby PatsyMFagan » September 11th, 2019, 6:15 pm

Seatallan wrote:Gosh, a blast from the past! Nice to be reminded of Teri.... :luv:

Wish I'd not had to leave the ransoms she gave me in the old garden. Still, I'm sure the new residents will enjoy them.


I can send you some more next Spring Seatallan … remind me :tu:
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby suffolk » September 11th, 2019, 6:41 pm

I may of course be wrong ... all things are possible ... but I have a distinct memory of making yoghurt in the mid/late 1970s in a yoghurt maker bought from Lakeland Plastics as it was then, using the starter sachet supplied. We then used a tablespoon of yoghurt for the next few batches but as each batch became weaker, every so often we would need another starter sachet ... several WI members would order a pack of sachets every so often and share them out. It would’ve been at the village WI where we were introduced to yoghurt making. This was the only way we could get yoghurt without a 20+ mile journey as rural shops didn’t sell what some folk thought of as sour milk. I know it was in the 70s as we moved to the small holding in the early eighties to keep a herd of dairy goats and make goat cheese and yoghurt and then we bought specialist starters from specialist suppliers.

There are quite a few yoghurt starters available online ... some from specialists, or via Amazon.
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby earthmaiden » September 11th, 2019, 6:58 pm

If you go for them it will be interesting to hear what they are like now we're in 2019 and much more familiar with all kinds of yogurt. I like the look of the machine too but the reviews seem varied.
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby StokeySue » September 11th, 2019, 7:55 pm

They arrive tomorrow but won’t be used until next week
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby Seatallan » September 12th, 2019, 8:22 am

PatsyMFagan wrote:I can send you some more next Spring Seatallan … remind me


Thanks dear Patsy- I'll do that :luv: :wave:
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby scullion » September 12th, 2019, 10:42 am

i was given a bel yoghurt maker in the mid seventies. i found, then, that it worked far better with added milk powder.
as i was probably the only one in my family that ate the yoghurt (the sour milk brigade was there as well) i found that when i'd got to the sixth pot it was always much thicker, anyway, than the first.
maybe plain yoghurt was more 'live' then or just the extra time left in the 'fridge gave it a longer ferment - in the same way that the kefir gets thicker in the fridge.

ps. i find that kefir (thanks, patsy) is so much less of a faf than making yoghurt, with similar enough results for taste (especially when flavoured) that i probably won't bother making yoghurt in the future - and i use it in cooking where yoghurt is required, too.
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby PatsyMFagan » September 12th, 2019, 12:47 pm

scullion wrote:ps. i find that kefir (thanks, patsy) is so much less of a faf than making yoghurt, with similar enough results for taste (especially when flavoured) that i probably won't bother making yoghurt in the future - and i use it in cooking where yoghurt is required, too.


I thought that too … in fact I prefer Kefir to plain yogurt in any event. Those with the later model Instant Pot rave over the yogurt making function, but you need nothing more than a jam jar for kefir and no heating etc. It has a wider strain of the probiotic stuff than yogurt too. It can also be strained to make a type of curd cheese, with the whey being used for scones and sourdough. :tu:
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby StokeySue » September 12th, 2019, 1:45 pm

The only kefir I’ve had is liquid, comes in milk bottles, so not quite sure how it works as a substitute for yogurt?
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby earthmaiden » September 12th, 2019, 2:49 pm

https://www.yeovalley.co.uk/things-we-m ... ral-kefir/

I've had this and other brands - think I've found it in Waitrose rather than some other supermarkets. Not sure if one can make one's own using it as a culture or not. I have given up on it as it always gives me the runs. :(.
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby Busybee » September 12th, 2019, 3:10 pm

earthmaiden wrote:https://www.yeovalley.co.uk/things-we-make/yogurt/natural-kefir/

I've had this and other brands - think I've found it in Waitrose rather than some other supermarkets. Not sure if one can make one's own using it as a culture or not. I have given up on it as it always gives me the runs. :(.


You will see on Chatterbox that I went to the Wensleydale creamery yesterday. I had a good sniff of the culture that’s added to the milk. Most people disliked the smell but I thought it smelt delicious, just like sour tangy yogurt. Interestingly, the man giving the demonstration made clear we weren’t to eat even a small a bit .......evidently it’s a hugely powerful laxative. Evidently you can get used to it and some old guy in the factory swears by drinking it every morning to ward off all ills. Maybe similar reaction that gives you an upset stomach EM?

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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby KC2 » September 12th, 2019, 4:31 pm

earthmaiden wrote:I used to make our own in the 70's using a thermos flask and starter just kept aside from the previous batch. We even made it like that for our whole food cafe. I think such methods would be considered sure to kill us these days ;).

Yup, me too, EM!
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby PatsyMFagan » September 12th, 2019, 8:50 pm

StokeySue wrote:The only kefir I’ve had is liquid, comes in milk bottles, so not quite sure how it works as a substitute for yogurt?


Scullion and I make our own kefir … nothing like that which you can buy in bottles. The resultant ferment can be strained to make it thicker, leaving whey, the same as yogurt. I suppose it really depends what you want to use yogurt for.
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby PatsyMFagan » September 12th, 2019, 8:50 pm

StokeySue wrote:The only kefir I’ve had is liquid, comes in milk bottles, so not quite sure how it works as a substitute for yogurt?


Scullion and I make our own kefir … nothing like that which you can buy in bottles. The resultant ferment can be strained to make it thicker, leaving whey, the same as yogurt. I suppose it really depends what you want to use yogurt for.
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby earthmaiden » September 12th, 2019, 9:12 pm

Busybee wrote:. Maybe similar reaction that gives you an upset stomach EM? BB

Quite possibly! I always assumed that it was adjusting my gut health as it is supposed to but got rather tired of it. Interesting about the cheese culture.
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby scullion » September 12th, 2019, 10:03 pm

not only is it easier to make than yoghurt, it has a far larger variety of microbes in. it's said to be the best thing to eat to increase the diversity of your gut microbiome.
i've passed a split of the grains on to quite a few people now.
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby Amber » September 13th, 2019, 5:57 pm

Sainsburys sell kefir yoghurt too.
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby PatsyMFagan » September 13th, 2019, 6:03 pm

Kefir yogurt is a contradiction - technically there is no such thing, just another marketing ploy. They are fermented differently and have different microbes. Milk is either made into Yogurt, or made into Kefir … So say the aficionados on the Fermenting facebook group ;) :tu:
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby earthmaiden » September 13th, 2019, 6:14 pm

Perhaps they use the word to indicate it is the consistency of yogurt to differentiate from the liquid sort we are more used to. Not that it makes it correct!
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby Amber » September 13th, 2019, 6:24 pm

I’ve never tried kefir. Is it (more or less) interchangeable with yoghurt?
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby scullion » September 13th, 2019, 8:50 pm

it's a little different. it isn't as solid and has a more fermented taste (the shop bought ones - and ryazhenka - are a little milder) and, as i said, it has a much wider culture profile. we take it with fruit syrup or jam in - i'm less fond of it plain.
i have used it in place of yoghurt in curry recipes and in persian lemon and yoghurt chicken (well, quorn as we're vegetarian).
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby PatsyMFagan » September 13th, 2019, 8:54 pm

Kefir might taste like sour milk to some … personally I prefer it to plain yogurt and I like the fact that the taste can change from one batch to another … it depends usually on the temperature it is fermented at (usually room temperature for 24 hours or fridge temperature for about 5 days) - the longer and cooler it ferments, the milder it tastes. Once the grains are strained out (they are then re-used ) using a sieve, the resultant ferment can be further strained through muslin for a much thicker finish, as it separates out the whey.
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Re: Lakeland - my foray into yoghurt making

Postby Amber » September 13th, 2019, 10:05 pm

I didn’t look today but I guess being ‘new’, it’s more expensive. But certainly something to try. With the kiwi berries.... ;) :D .
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