Family sayings

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Family sayings

Postby TeresaFoodie » July 4th, 2017, 6:02 pm

On another thread it was mentioned that something I say without thinking, and maybe it was something said by all, was 'like Billyo' as in with gusto. I herald from a family of Londoners who moved to Essex when the new towns were built post WWII and then I moved to Herts then Beds and 'Billyo' is still in my vocabulary.
Have you got any sayings you would like to mention that are in your family or in day to day speak without you necessarily realising you are doing it?
Slightly different to topic I guess, but my Uncle lives in a beautiful thatched cottage with little step ladders going up into lofts. Me and my Sister when kids used to play hide and seek in there, hiding little clues all over the place. One clue one time could not be found so me and Uncle were shouting at my Sister 'try the bathroom!' which is where we knew the next clue was. Now whenever we gather at the cottage you can hear 'try the bathroom' quite frequently.
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Re: Family sayings

Postby liketocook » July 4th, 2017, 6:19 pm

As far as I know there are no family connections to the south of England (I'm a Scots/Irish mongerel ;) ) but "Billyo" is one my family use generally to reflect a pain as in "it stung like Billyo" :D . One that get used a fair bit when something is not to your taste food-wise is "tastes like onion trifle" :sprout: , this goes back to my Mum accidently using the same spoon she had used to make bread sauce to stir custard one Christmas resulting in two very odd flavoured dishes :D
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Re: Family sayings

Postby suffolk » July 4th, 2017, 6:53 pm

At the end of a meal, when offered second (or third) helpings, Pa would always say what his Pa had said before him, "No thank you - that was very good ... If the King himself were to ask me to dinner I'd have so say 'No Thank You King, I've had sufficient'. :lol:
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Busybee » July 4th, 2017, 7:33 pm

suffolk wrote:At the end of a meal, when offered second (or third) helpings, Pa would always say what his Pa had said before him, "No thank you - that was very good ... If the King himself were to ask me to dinner I'd have so say 'No Thank You King, I've had sufficient'. :lol:


My dad says something similar............no thanks, I've had a sufficiency.

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Re: Family sayings

Postby mum-at-the-oven » July 4th, 2017, 9:26 pm

Like Billyo was also used in my family. Blithering idiot was another one used by my Dad- I giggled to myself when my Son used it recently - I hadn't heard that for many years.
Mum was Irish
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References to Banshees and being Mutt and Jeff etc...

There were some odd sayings in our house but we all understood and it worked well.
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Re: Family sayings

Postby hickybank » July 4th, 2017, 10:07 pm

When rain clouds were rolling in my dad used to say
"Its looking black over Bills mothers"
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Re: Family sayings

Postby StokeySue » July 4th, 2017, 11:03 pm

I'm pretty sure we mentioned Billy-oh
I think of it more as period, between the wars, than regional, a sort of Swallows and Amazons or Mapp and Lucia thing. In fact I'm fairly sure Arthur Ransome used the expression in Swallows and Amazons?

We had a habit if picking up other people's malapropisms or phrases from TV programmes, they didn't make a lot of sense to anyone who didn't know the sourceFor example we always called sausages sorridges as my little friend Anne said it when we were tiny. I recently heard an old friend come out with it, unaware of where he'd acquired it (definitely from me!)
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Re: Family sayings

Postby TeresaFoodie » July 5th, 2017, 5:51 am

My Dad last night responded to a text of mine 'well I'll be hornswoggled'. I'd never heard that being used before!
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Badger's mate » July 5th, 2017, 7:38 am

Don't think we ever used Billy-oh at home but remember a teacher or dinner lady at school using it, and it stuck in my mind.

TV and radio made an impression then as now. I don't know if hornswoggled came that way but as a child I could certainly quote words from Round the Horne or I'm Sorry I'll Read That Again.

When I saw the recent reference to 'willicks' I initially thought it was whelks spelled incorrectly - apologies for doubting you... :oops:
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Pepper Pig » July 5th, 2017, 8:08 am

If anyone was odd in any way they were "As queer as Dick's hatband". :o :lol: No idea where that came from. My all time favourite was my granny who would say "I've got so much to do today I don't know if I'm on foot or horseback".
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Re: Family sayings

Postby suffolk » July 5th, 2017, 8:55 am

hickybank wrote:When rain clouds were rolling in my dad used to say
"Its looking black over Bills mothers"


... and when my parents said that (which they often did) I thought they were referring to old Bill Claydon the Lengthsman, who lived in a cottage down the road and grew remarkable rhubarb. His mother had lived in the next village over the fields to the west ...
“I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” —Winnie-the-Pooh
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Meganthemog » July 5th, 2017, 9:14 am

My mother when asked if something looked ok as in 'can you see the little hole in my tights?' would always reply 'a man on a galloping horse wouldn't see it'. My sis and I still say it! My father's friend would say after a big meal 'I'm pogged'.
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Hope » July 5th, 2017, 9:29 am

I can't think of any, but then I wouldn't necessarily know they were unusual if they are usual to our family.

But when playing Monopoly it was family tradition to mixprounce certain roads, the way my Maltese grandmother did, such as Trafalgar and Leicester (the latter the way the Americans do). Sometimes I find myself saying them in other contexts and people think I'm stupid! Particularly with Trafalgar (I think we say it "Traff-al-gar") I can't actually remember which is the right way to say it and which is my crazy family's way!
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Seatallan » July 5th, 2017, 9:34 am

I think I've mentioned before that if anything went missing, my auntie always said it would be found 'in Annie's room behind the clock'. Never heard anyone else use that expression. Other family expressions included calling inanimate objects 'my hacker', noting there was sufficient blue sky to 'make a Chinaman a pair of trousers' and having not done something/seen something 'since Hector was a pup'.
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Meganthemog » July 5th, 2017, 10:25 am

With us it was make a sailor a pair of trousers out of the blue sky!
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Re: Family sayings

Postby StokeySue » July 5th, 2017, 10:51 am

Yes, we used to look for enough sky to make a sailor a pair of trousers, though I've come across families who wanted to make him a top.
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Hope » July 5th, 2017, 11:08 am

Why does a sailor need such a big top/trousers? I don't get it! (does it actually make sense or am I just being far too literal?!)
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Re: Family sayings

Postby suffolk » July 5th, 2017, 11:21 am

Bro had a children's story book where Teddy and Golly (that dates us doesn't it) were looking for 'enough blue sky to make a sailor a pair of trousers' so they could have a picnic ... I wonder if he still has that book?
“I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” —Winnie-the-Pooh
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Re: Family sayings

Postby suffolk » July 5th, 2017, 11:23 am

Hope wrote:Why does a sailor need such a big top/trousers? I don't get it! (does it actually make sense or am I just being far too literal?!)


It wasn't about it being a big top or trousers ... it was about if it was a cloudy day with just a bit of blue peeping through ... the idea was that if there was enough for a pair of trousers (or top) the weather was improving. Of course, it had to be a sailor 'cos they wore blue bell bottoms :D
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Hope » July 5th, 2017, 11:29 am

Oh, ok, so it does sort of make sense, then!
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Re: Family sayings

Postby suffolk » July 5th, 2017, 11:50 am

Hope wrote:Oh, ok, so it does sort of make sense, then!


Of course it does .......... the Met Office has been using this method for years ;)
“I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” —Winnie-the-Pooh
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Hope » July 5th, 2017, 12:00 pm

:lol:

I love finding out the origins of sayings, when they did actually mean something literally, although that meaning has been lost over the years. Like nose to the grindstone, literally meant that. On tenterhooks, etc.
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Badger's mate » July 5th, 2017, 1:43 pm

hickybank wrote:When rain clouds were rolling in my dad used to say
"Its looking black over Bills mothers"


They were always 'as black as Newgate's knocker' at home
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Ratatouille » July 5th, 2017, 2:22 pm

Meganthemog wrote:My mother when asked if something looked ok as in 'can you see the little hole in my tights?' would always reply 'a man on a galloping horse wouldn't see it'. My sis and I still say it!.


My Gran used to say the same but she went even further - a blind man on a galloping horse.

My mother used to say, if she was meeting someone. "If I get there first I'll chalk a cross and if you get there first rub it off"

Everyone said, and still do, when autumn draws in "It's getting late soon isn't it?"
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Chinchilla_lady » July 5th, 2017, 2:40 pm

Mum used "Up In Annies Room Behind The Clock" too.

If I did something daft I was a Nincompoop, which used to send off in peals of laughter. And proved the point no doubt.

If I asked where she was going it was there and back to see how far it was.
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Re: Family sayings

Postby TeresaFoodie » July 5th, 2017, 5:25 pm

'There and back to see how far it is' is something my Mum still says as did her Mum before her.
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Re: Family sayings

Postby EmWilk » July 5th, 2017, 10:16 pm

Chinchilla_lady wrote:If I asked where she was going it was there and back to see how far it was.


We had this one too.

And "I'm off to see a man about a dog".

My mum always says "more [xxx] than soft Mick" which I believe is local.

My grandma always says "get knotted" like you might say "get stuffed"

And my fave... "I could eat a horse and go back for t'jockey"

When something annoys me, I say it gets on my wick.

I've no idea if these are commonly used sayings or not actually... I don't seem to hear many others use them though.
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Re: Family sayings

Postby mum-at-the-oven » July 5th, 2017, 10:32 pm

EmWilk wrote:When something annoys me, I say it gets on my wick.


That's Cockney rhyming slang - Hampton Wick! Still used extensively today in London (well Londoners) - it's a common expression around here - although I am really surprised that it's used in your neck of the woods Em!
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Re: Family sayings

Postby StokeySue » July 5th, 2017, 11:18 pm

In and around Portsmouth we used to complain of things or people getting on our wick, and if sufficiently annoyed we'd tell the annoyance to get knotted
I'm wondering if Steptoe may not have popularised the terms? I can hear 'arold telling someone to get knotted in my head :D I just checked - first aired 1962 to 1974
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Re: Family sayings

Postby hickybank » July 6th, 2017, 8:19 am

Another two I have just thought of
Stop your blethering (stop moaning)
What are you wittering on about (stop pestering me)
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Ratatouille » July 6th, 2017, 8:48 am

I unthinkingly repeated one eof my Gran's favourites yesterday when a missing parcel turned up. "Well I'll go to the foot of our stairs". It amused Mr R greatly and he rushed off to write it down.

There are, of course all sorts of wonerful dialect sayings which are practically incomprehensible to non-native speakers.

"Divent cowp yer kreels" - don't trip over. I said it to the GC's when they were small

The trolley bus drivers in Newcastle used to call out "Lowp oot here fer the.........." At each stop. The stop nearest our road was known as "Titty bottle corner" It was a small park with benches where to nannies from the posh houses used to sit around and chat.
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Herbidacious » July 6th, 2017, 10:11 am

The only 'peculiar' one that I an think of in my family is that whenever I thanked my grandma for anything, she used to say what sounded like 'Twos and tats'. For years I thought this meant 'cupboard love'. I am afraid that is the kind of response one could expect from my not terribly loving or charitable grandmother. However, I realized eventually (whilst watching Babette's Feast at the cinema) that she what she was probably saying 'thank you' in Danish. I am guessing she got this off her deceased husband's aunt, who had once been a governess in Denmark.
I am pretty sure my grandma did say cupboard love too. I wonder what the origins of that is.
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Re: Family sayings

Postby StokeySue » July 6th, 2017, 10:22 am

Herbidacious wrote:nmark.
I am pretty sure my grandma did say cupboard love too. I wonder what the origins of that is.

I think that's quite straightforward isn't it? Cosying up to someone to get at what they have (in their full cupboard), mainly food
As in Old Mother Hubbard
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Catherine » July 6th, 2017, 10:30 am

'they or I got elbow' or 'elbowed it' -meaning lost ones nerve. So to be topical as it is Wimbledon fortnight if a player was to lose having been well and truly ahead you would say they elbowed the match or got the elbow
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Herbidacious » July 6th, 2017, 10:52 am

I expect so, Sue, unless it has some arcane political derivation.
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Riocaz » July 6th, 2017, 11:27 am

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Re: Family sayings

Postby Ratatouille » July 6th, 2017, 12:16 pm

Catherine wrote:'they or I got elbow' or 'elbowed it' -meaning lost ones nerve. So to be topical as it is Wimbledon fortnight if a player was to lose having been well and truly ahead you would say they elbowed the match or got the elbow


Very appropriate with regards Mark Cavendish's exit from Le Tour!!

You all need a copy of Brewers Phrase and Fable!:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/d/Books/Brewer ... 0550102450

It is one of the most used books on our shelves
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Re: Family sayings

Postby suffolk » July 6th, 2017, 12:55 pm

Mine got 'borrowed' many many moons ago .................... :rolleyes:
“I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” —Winnie-the-Pooh
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Re: Family sayings

Postby StokeySue » July 6th, 2017, 1:14 pm

You can usually get a cheap reprint of Brewer at those very cheap book shops
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Herbidacious » July 6th, 2017, 1:40 pm

I have a copy at home :)
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Re: Family sayings

Postby hickybank » July 6th, 2017, 1:59 pm

Wow Herby you have two copies, can I have one :lol: :lol: :lol:
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Herbidacious » July 6th, 2017, 4:24 pm

? Did that post twice?
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Re: Family sayings

Postby hickybank » July 6th, 2017, 4:56 pm

Herbidacious wrote:? Did that post twice?


Yes but now only one, strange, so no fee book then :( :(
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Herbidacious » July 7th, 2017, 9:46 am

well for a fee, it's possible... ;) But if I had two I would send you one for free, Terry :D
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Re: Family sayings

Postby scullion » July 7th, 2017, 10:04 am

by mum-at-the-oven » July 5th, 2017, 11:32 pm

EmWilk wrote:
When something annoys me, I say it gets on my wick.


That's Cockney rhyming slang - Hampton Wick! Still used extensively today in London (well Londoners) - it's a common expression around here - although I am really surprised that it's used in your neck of the woods Em!
Pleased though ..


some cockney rhyming slang travelled far and wide - especially during the evacuations. i'm sure everyone's called someone a berk at sometime but fewer realise it's a rhyming slang shortening of berkshire hunt.
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Re: Family sayings

Postby StokeySue » July 7th, 2017, 10:32 am

In Portsmouth there was a lot of Cockney in the speech and even the accent, due mainly I understand to movement of dockyard workers and shipbuilders from the East End to Pompey. I could clearly distinguish between a Portsmouth and a Hampshire accent in the sixties, although the two were separated only by a short bridge (ok, Paulsgrove on the mainland had the dockyard accent, but they thought of themselves as Pompey)
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Rocky » July 7th, 2017, 11:15 am

When we were little if someone was grumpy they were 'crabby'

When OH and I were in our early days, polos were experimenting the size of their sweets - they had ridiculously tiny ones. I embarked on a long monologue about this which greatly amused OH. Now, if anyone is talking rubbish , it is a size of sweets comment. A bit embarrassing when I use it with anyone other than family.....
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Re: Family sayings

Postby TeresaFoodie » July 7th, 2017, 6:42 pm

Where does 'well I'll go to the foot of my stairs' come from? Whenever my family used to say it, it was in possibly a Scouser accent. Maybe a comic show or something, as all my lot are London and never knew where it came from I fell In love with Brookside pretty quick! Lovely accent if, to me, understandable.
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Pepper Pig » July 7th, 2017, 6:50 pm

According to my mum most things were "A lot of old hooey".
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Catherine » July 7th, 2017, 8:58 pm

Baloney - talking a load of rubbish

If I was being cheeky my nanna used to call me 'little tyke' or a 'little imp'
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