Family sayings

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Re: Family sayings

Postby smitch » July 7th, 2017, 9:06 pm

I still use loads of the sayings I picked up in Hull. I've caught my husband using them too and he's born and bred Manc :lol:

To me, mafting or mafted means hot, nithered is cold. Grafted means dirty. Bain is a child. Twagging is skipping school and a croggy is when you give someone a lift on the back of your bike. My time in Liverpool means I always call police 'busies/bizzies'. I've also got some Yorkshire from my family. Taffled means tangled. 'Frame yourself' is when you're not trying or putting enough effort in.

I remember when I worked in Sheffield, one Christmas my colleague kept mentioning we needed to 'trim t'tree'. Took me ages to work out she wanted to get the Christmas decorations out :lol:
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Re: Family sayings

Postby EmWilk » July 8th, 2017, 7:45 am

They're some good ones Smitch!

We "nick off" school round here and we also "trim up" at Christmas.

I'm sure this must be a common one but I only ever hear my dad (and us) say he'll be "two ticks of a timex tick tock"
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Busybee » July 8th, 2017, 8:05 am

Not a saying but when ever I hear the word Timex I feel obliged to sing ' ticky, ticky Timex tra la la' it used to signal the beginning of Christmas advertising, usually November.

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Re: Family sayings

Postby suffolk » July 8th, 2017, 8:14 am

Busybee wrote:Not a saying but when ever I hear the word Timex I feel obliged to sing ' ticky, ticky Timex tra la la' it used to signal the beginning of Christmas advertising, usually November.

BB


Same here :lol:
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Re: Family sayings

Postby hickybank » July 8th, 2017, 10:12 am

I am currently reading a book "The Tippling Philosopher" by Jeremy James it is a series of short stories about locals in the Clun area of Shropshire & is written in the local dialect.
At the front is a glossary of local words & there meaning.
Do you fancy having a bash at what they mean ( no googling allowed) I will give answers tomorrow

Bleat, Eeyore, Corks (all mean the same)
Caimit
Comorondo
Keffel
Leech
Ronk
Scracher
Silver buttons
---------
Phrases

Hes got a Charley on his back
Pert as a spoon
In with the bread & out with the cake
Hers a bit heavy behind
Common sense is not so common
A brain is as strong as it's weakest think
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Re: Family sayings

Postby TeresaFoodie » July 8th, 2017, 10:23 am

I have heard He's got a Charley on his back but no idea what it meant. The other's, no idea.

We have always called bread buppy. And if it has a crusty outer such as a baguette or farmhouse loaf, crusty bup.
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Re: Family sayings

Postby suffolk » July 8th, 2017, 10:40 am

No idea about any of those Hickey, except that 'Hers a bit heavy behind' may be referring to a 'traditionally built' lady ... what a Suffolk lad would call a 'mawther' or describe as being a bit 'whool'.
“I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” —Winnie-the-Pooh
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Re: Family sayings

Postby hickybank » July 8th, 2017, 2:02 pm

Thanks Suffs but no where near, let you know tomorrow
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Catherine » July 8th, 2017, 2:10 pm

Who let Lizzy out of jail? - I'll let you lot come up with suggestions :)
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Re: Family sayings

Postby hickybank » July 8th, 2017, 8:47 pm

Possibly the same as Who let Polly out of prison, I remember that from my school days :oops: :oops:
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Re: Family sayings

Postby hickybank » July 9th, 2017, 9:25 am

O/K for those remotely interested here are Answers

Bleat, Eeyore, Corks Money
Caimit Idiot
Comorondo An argument
Keffel Clumsy person
Leech Doctor
Ronk To stink
Scracher bed
Silver buttons Policeman
---------
Phrases

He’s got a Charley on his back He’s in a bad mood
Pert as a spoon Bright person
In with the bread & out with the cake Simple minded
Hers a bit heavy behind To be lazy
Common sense is not so common
A brain is as strong as it's weakest think
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Luca » July 9th, 2017, 11:26 am

I didn't know any of those hicky. Mind you I'm not sure I've heard a lot of the others either.
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Re: Family sayings

Postby StokeySue » July 9th, 2017, 7:41 pm

I think leech is quite widespread for doctir, I have come across it elsewhere, but didn't make the connection out of context

A west Midlands one "nesh", to be feeling cold, or to be susceptible to cold
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Pepper Pig » July 9th, 2017, 7:58 pm

When I was having shoulder physio last year the girl doing it said "can you stand up straight. At the moment you're on the huh". I knew she was a Norfolk girl from that moment on! :D
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Re: Family sayings

Postby EmWilk » July 9th, 2017, 8:24 pm

StokeySue wrote:A west Midlands one "nesh", to be feeling cold, or to be susceptible to cold


We say nish round these parts.

My brother always says lush quite a lot when referencing alcohol... "I'm going to the lush (pub)", "he's a lush head", and also lash... "he's getting lashed up".

Which reminds me, I got to thinking today... why do we say up, down, etc after certain verbs? And what determines the direction when both mean the same?! Clean up, clean (something) down, kneel up or down...?
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Re: Family sayings

Postby StokeySue » July 9th, 2017, 9:52 pm

EmWilk wrote:Which reminds me, I got to thinking today... why do we say up, down, etc after certain verbs? And what determines the direction when both mean the same?! Clean up, clean (something) down, kneel up or down...?

I have a funny feeling that in most cases where the preposition doesn't give you useful information it is probably redundant, or just a habit, as in "fry off the onions", a phrase in which "off" only seems a bit of emphasis that is not really needed.

Clean up seems to be a standard phrase that's used where you want to make a general statement so I might say "clean the kitchen", but more vaguely "clean up a bit, can you?". But that may say more about me than grammar :?
I would think of clean / wash down as quite technical or thorough, but again that might just be me!

As a southerner I suspect northerners use more of these phrases, I noticed the Sheffield office always decided upon something whereas London just decided [to do] it

I don't think I've ever heard kneel up, don't see how you can kneel in any direction but down, so again kneel alone would do, though down adds emphasis perhaps.

The English language is too old and confused to make complete sense I suppose!
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Re: Family sayings

Postby hickybank » July 10th, 2017, 7:59 am

So why do we say fed up, but not fed down, because when you are fed up you are down :lol:
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Re: Family sayings

Postby StokeySue » July 10th, 2017, 9:51 am

Good illustration of the illogicality Hicky!
Except I think fed up possibly relates here to 'full up' which does make sense as 'full up to the brim'?
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Catherine » July 10th, 2017, 2:15 pm

hickybank wrote:So why do we say fed up, but not fed down, because when you are fed up you are down :lol:


The one that gets me is the 'near miss' - surely by definition if it was a near miss then it in actual fact hit
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Re: Family sayings

Postby StokeySue » July 10th, 2017, 2:30 pm

As a former rifle shooter 'near miss' makes perfect sense to me
10 points for a bull's eye, but if it nicks the edge of the disc, it's 9 points for an outer, but it's a near miss to a perfect ten
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Catherine » July 10th, 2017, 2:35 pm

StokeySue wrote:As a former rifle shooter 'near miss' makes perfect sense to me
10 points for a bull's eye, but if it nicks the edge of the disc, it's 9 points for an outer, but it's a near miss to a perfect ten


I was thinking more in the context of say when 2 trains nearly crashed and they say 'near miss' if it nearly missed then it didn't miss
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Re: Family sayings

Postby StokeySue » July 10th, 2017, 2:51 pm

Ah, I see what you mean
So used to the phrase it just moved across in my head
Near miss does still make sense, if planes are meant to keep less than 1000 m apart, but get to within 50 m without touching, it's a near or close miss, as they do miss but are too near (or close) for comfort
But nearly missed is a slip of grammar there
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Re: Family sayings

Postby TeresaFoodie » July 10th, 2017, 5:16 pm

One eye and a whelk, as in a person with one good eye and one not so good.

Wood in hole, as in close the door, or another with the same meaning - was you born in a barn?
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Gruney » July 11th, 2017, 9:43 am

A new one to me.

I've just got back from dog walking. I spent a couple of minutes with an old lady, I see most mornings. We've had a slight sprinkling overnight - she said "it wasn't enough to gve a thirsty man a sip".
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Re: Family sayings

Postby StokeySue » July 11th, 2017, 9:50 am

TeresaFoodie wrote:Wood in hole, as in close the door, or another with the same meaning - was you born in a barn?

I'd forgotten wood in hole, can't think who I knew used to say it :D
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Catherine » July 11th, 2017, 12:30 pm

Playing the wag
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Re: Family sayings

Postby scullion » September 4th, 2019, 5:39 pm

do you want to join the 'old sayings' thread with this one?
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Ratatouille » September 4th, 2019, 7:00 pm

Mine are, What's bred in the bone comes out in a wooden leg.

Even more NE "He goes through Berwick to get to Morpeth. Meaning he never gets to the point.
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Re: Family sayings

Postby TeresaFoodie » September 4th, 2019, 11:22 pm

Rats :lol:

We've got a right little collection now haven't we? :tu: I'll enjoy recapping on this thread tomorrow. :grin:
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Seatallan » September 5th, 2019, 8:14 am

'Everyone's queer save me and thee, and thee's queer sometimes'

That was one of my mum's favorites :luv:
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Re: Family sayings

Postby Ratatouille » September 5th, 2019, 12:34 pm

When DD was a trainee solicitor in a rather smart firm in London she puzzled the folk in the office when, having made a slight mistake, she said !Ooo I hope I don't get wrong" meaning she hope she wasn't told off, reprimanded etc.It's one of thos phrased which just slips out of otherwise "well spoken" geordies mouths.
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Re: Family sayings

Postby earthmaiden » September 5th, 2019, 4:07 pm

They say that in Norfolk too. I've never heard it any further south.
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Re: Family sayings

Postby suffolk » September 6th, 2019, 5:56 am

earthmaiden wrote:They say that in Norfolk too. I've never heard it any further south.


It was certainly said in North Suffolk during my childhood EM ... or a young friend would say ‘You’ll get wrong’ usually preceded by an accusatory long drawn-out ‘vum’ ... never heard that sort of accusatory exclamation used anywhere
... and it was only ever used by children :?
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Re: Family sayings

Postby earthmaiden » September 6th, 2019, 6:21 am

It was commonplace for all a bit up the coast from you (but with the addition of 'vum' of course for children!). Sorry, when I said south I was thinking of the home counties including Sussex and Wiltshire which are the other places I've lived.
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Re: Family sayings

Postby TeresaFoodie » September 6th, 2019, 11:21 pm

A duck under the table.

Air pie and windy pudding.

The two that my dad's mum would say when asked what was for tea.

She was a Londoner. I wonder if these were said elsewhere.
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