UK Food Culture

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UK Food Culture

Postby StokeySue » January 16th, 2018, 11:39 am

Some of you may have heard Angela Hartnett touch on this on Desert Island Discs, but Deborah Robertson has expanded on it

Hope this link works
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/food-and-drink/features/anything-less-appetising-britains-food-snobbery/amp/?__twitter_impression=true
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Re: UK Food Culture

Postby Busybee » January 16th, 2018, 11:51 am

I read this earlier, I think she makes some interesting points regarding food snobbery.

On a similar but unrelated thread I have listed about Iceland, a retailer that some turn their noses up, being the first to address plastic packaging.

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Re: UK Food Culture

Postby StokeySue » January 16th, 2018, 11:59 am

There's a virtual Yummy Mummy exclusion zone round Iceland and Savers which are together on our high street. Makes me laugh
If you have small children they are both very useful shops, you don't have to buy the small amounts of tacky stuff
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Re: UK Food Culture

Postby Herbidacious » January 16th, 2018, 2:37 pm

I am pretty sure the photo on this article is Franklin's in East Dulwich. Very very overpriced, and basics dressed up as posh. (Although the restaurant is excellent.) "But that's East Dulwich for you," I sneered as I saw a man with a bag of leaks he'd bought on the farmer's market at 4 times the price of the supermarket or proper market equivalent, and almost which almost certainly did not taste any better. (Although they may have had better environmental credentials.)
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Re: UK Food Culture

Postby Ratatouille » January 16th, 2018, 2:52 pm

It is odd about Iceland isn't it? Practically no-one in France would feel ashamed of popping into Picard - which is admittedly more expensive because it has a wider Luxury range.
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Re: UK Food Culture

Postby earthmaiden » January 16th, 2018, 3:43 pm

I find the snobbery around places like M&S and Waitrose baffling. M&S food is overpriced and often just plain nasty and the service in Waitrose abysmal though some of the breads and meat very nice.

I don't find it odd that people don't like Iceland. Ours is hell. Always packed with dithery families, the queues are really horrendous and is seems every other customer has some issue with paying, never brings a bag, uses umpteen plastic carriers etc. The stock and staff are very nice but the whole 'experience' really isn't.

I am a shopping snob. I hate supermarkets full of rude, brash people. I don't like supporting Tesco or Walmart. The best 'shopping experiences' here are Sainsburys and Lidl. I have had to budget very carefully in the past and Iceland and similar stores were a godsend. Generally they don't sell what I want though.

The thought of a twee high street and the time and money to browse round 'artisan' shops is very attractive and those kind of shops, although expensive, often sell nice treats. If you've got the money I can see the attraction.

Shopping really has become an 'experience' rather than just buying what is required - for those able to afford the luxury.
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Re: UK Food Culture

Postby StokeySue » January 16th, 2018, 4:09 pm

Ratatouille wrote:which is admittedly more expensive because it has a wider Luxury range.

Iceland have a range they actually call Luxury
Superb value IMHO, especially the fresh, not frozen, bakery - the sourdough crumpets are :drool: but the frozen seafood is often good too



earthmaiden wrote:Waitrose baffling. M&S food is overpriced and often just plain nasty and the service in Waitrose abysmal though some of the breads and meat very nice.


I dont think Debbie is really talking about M&S, and only partly about Waitrose. Though theNM glorification of M&S in some quarters has always puzzled me too. It's more the Franklins and farmer's market shopping Herbi mentions

There was a guy used to post on the BBC board also from Stokey who used to tell us we couldn't make drinkable coffee at home as we hadn't paid nearly £400 for a Gaggia macine and we didn't make decent salads as we weren't drizzling them with Italian olive oil that cost more than single malt Scotch. Then there was the one who mail ordered dried chick peas because supermarket ones at a quarter the price couldn't possibly be good enough for her hummus!
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Re: UK Food Culture

Postby Zosherooney » January 16th, 2018, 5:28 pm

I can remember shopping in a place called 'Weigh to Go' and you bought from loose stock, nearly everything and paper bags. This was in the 70's and did not last long..... I can see it returning before long....
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Re: UK Food Culture

Postby Herbidacious » January 16th, 2018, 5:31 pm

Hmm. I have compared and contrasted the same products in different ones and M&S often comes out tops, followed by Waitrose (bearing in mind not meat or fish involved.) I don't think this is snobbery on my part or my being deceived by brand reputation.

I find shopping in Lidl and Iceland very depressing and often give up due to queues. They are chaotic and don't sell anything that's worth my while waiting 20 minutes or even ten minutes for. (It sounds like this is branch dependent.) My Waitrose staff are lovely (the customers are not.) Sainsbury's, however, is still my default. Waitrose is no better than it ought to be, doesn't have all the things I want and is overpriced (although they now have a basics range.)

Farmers markets and the like are to me a recreational experience, and occasional supplier of things I can't buy elsewhere. I am sure they are this for many others too. It's more entertainment than food shopping. But for some, I suspect, it's more fashion than food shopping. Little personal taste is involved in the assessment of purchases.
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Re: UK Food Culture

Postby Suelle » January 20th, 2018, 11:53 am

Ian Jack, in The Guardian, adds some interesting points to the debate:

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfr ... an-cuisine
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Re: UK Food Culture

Postby Herbidacious » January 20th, 2018, 10:55 pm

Interesting. Got me thinking though. Hasn't a decline in home cooking really got an awful lot to do with women going out to work? I suppose this is obvious.
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