Back In Time for Tea

Order yourself a latte, and a pastry (The virtual cinnamon buns are excellent today). And have a nice chat.

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby suffolk » February 8th, 2018, 11:39 pm

Granny's sister was a maid, rising to housekeeper for a marquis. She was unmarried.
“One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.”
― Virginia Woolf
User avatar
suffolk
Registered
 
Posts: 36604
Joined: August 11th, 2010, 6:47 am
Location: East Anglia, surprisingly!

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby liketocook » February 9th, 2018, 9:04 am

My late great aunt had been "in service" before the war when she joined the "land army". She got stationed on a large estate in Perthshire where she met my great uncle who was the game keeper and exempt from service (not sure why). They married when the war ended and continued to work on the estate for many years, she eventually became head housekeeper. They worked on estates across Scotland for most of their life. In the last place before they retired the owners mainly lived abroad so they had the run of the place though were always very respectful it was fab to visit as a youngster and see all the grand rooms in the "big house".
liketocook
Registered
 
Posts: 1833
Joined: December 31st, 2009, 5:05 pm
Location: south ayrshire - scotland

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby suffolk » February 9th, 2018, 10:08 am

liketocook wrote:she met my great uncle who was the game keeper and exempt from service (not sure why)


Essential part of the agricultural workforce to produce food (some men who were farmers or farm workers were kept on the land, my uncle - Pa's older brother - was one of them) ... gamekeepers were seen as essential because if the vermin (rabbits, pigeons etc) weren't kept down then food production would be hit ....... well, that was the theory ......... it couldn't possibly have been that the landowners and their political friends needed the grouse moors and fishing rivers to be kept properly could it ......... or that the estates needed 'policing' to prevent villagers from adding to their meagre rations by a bit of poaching .......??? :rolleyes:
“One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.”
― Virginia Woolf
User avatar
suffolk
Registered
 
Posts: 36604
Joined: August 11th, 2010, 6:47 am
Location: East Anglia, surprisingly!

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby StokeySue » February 9th, 2018, 10:24 am

My great grandmother on my father's side was in service at some point, later she "temped" going in to people who didn't have full time help, often when a farmer's wife was ill or giving birth. She had two illegitimate sons (both became coal miners) probably not best suited to service, she answered back! Her DIL, my grandma, was a good plain cook

My maternal grandmother having met her husband while working in army hospitals in WW1 employed a cook general and a nurse maid but worked full time in grandpa's business. She couldn't cook other than cake and jam, so neither could my mum when she got married in 1944. She learned to cook in a very basic rented kitchen from Ministry of Food leaflets; she was far from alone in this and I think it would make a good one off Back in Time
Sue
User avatar
StokeySue
Registered
 
Posts: 19020
Joined: April 21st, 2010, 5:18 pm
Location: Stoke Newington (London)

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby liketocook » February 9th, 2018, 11:31 am

suffolk wrote:
liketocook wrote:she met my great uncle who was the game keeper and exempt from service (not sure why)


Essential part of the agricultural workforce to produce food (some men who were farmers or farm workers were kept on the land, my uncle - Pa's older brother - was one of them) ... gamekeepers were seen as essential because if the vermin (rabbits, pigeons etc) weren't kept down then food production would be hit ....... well, that was the theory ......... it couldn't possibly have been that the landowners and their political friends needed the grouse moors and fishing rivers to be kept properly could it ......... or that the estates needed 'policing' to prevent villagers from adding to their meagre rations by a bit of poaching .......??? :rolleyes:

Thanks suffs - I knew it wasn't on health grounds as he was as fit as a fiddle :)
liketocook
Registered
 
Posts: 1833
Joined: December 31st, 2009, 5:05 pm
Location: south ayrshire - scotland

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby Herbidacious » February 9th, 2018, 8:11 pm

My mother's family were all in't mill in Blackburn although my mother's paternal side had moved up from London in the 1880s - generations of stonemasons originally from Hertfordshire. I assume out of work down south.

My West Yorkshire lot were farmers on one side and sort of mill owners on the other. My grandma and her sisters all had to work in a mill when they left school at 14 making firelighters. They were 2 miles from where this series is set, in Wyke.

My mother used to cycle to Blackpool from Blackburn. Not that far. Scarborough would have been quite a long trip from Bradford. Going there because Blackpool was Lancashire sounds a bit like cutting your nose off to spite your face. Quite a few of the West Yorkshire lot retired to Blackpool. I know my grandma used to go to Morecombe albeit in the 50s. (She was in Shropshire in the 30s). I get the impression they didn't really go on holiday in the 20s.
User avatar
Herbidacious
Registered
 
Posts: 4798
Joined: August 11th, 2012, 2:48 pm
Location: South East London, and occasionally Normandy

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby Herbidacious » February 9th, 2018, 8:33 pm

p.s. really enjoyed the first episode.
User avatar
Herbidacious
Registered
 
Posts: 4798
Joined: August 11th, 2012, 2:48 pm
Location: South East London, and occasionally Normandy

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby Meganthemog » February 12th, 2018, 10:18 am

My grandmother left Somerset and went into service in London. On her day off she would go with another girl who worked in the same house to meet the girl's brother who was a policeman. One day he brought their brother along and that's how my grandparents met.
They moved to Wales and I remember their house so well. The kitchen had a little gas cooker and a bath with a wooden lid that was used as the work top. The toilet was outside the kitchen door so not exactly outside but almost - it was very cold. My granddad would sit in the main room - there was only one - at the table and cut newspapers into squares that were threaded onto a butcher's hook and then hung in the loo. I would try my best to not have to ever use the loo!
I really enjoy these types of programme - their faces when trying the tripe were priceless. Although I have never tasted it I don't think I would want to now.
Meganthemog
Registered
 
Posts: 1161
Joined: March 31st, 2010, 1:05 pm
Location: Swansea and sometimes Kent

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby StokeySue » February 12th, 2018, 10:26 am

There's a house in Liverpool Albert docks that is furnished as if during WW2
When I went round it was amazing how much people were discussing the items they recognised, in particular there was a white coth with a yellow border on the table, in the fifties ours was the same design in red, my auntie's was green, and the lady next to me knew blue
House! :D
Sue
User avatar
StokeySue
Registered
 
Posts: 19020
Joined: April 21st, 2010, 5:18 pm
Location: Stoke Newington (London)

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby Meganthemog » February 12th, 2018, 12:34 pm

StokeySue wrote:There's a house in Liverpool Albert docks that is furnished as if during WW2
When I went round it was amazing how much people were discussing the items they recognised, in particular there was a white coth with a yellow border on the table, in the fifties ours was the same design in red, my auntie's was green, and the lady next to me knew blue
House! :D


Was it a printed design on a fairly heavy cotton SS? If so I have a blue one inherited from my granny!
Meganthemog
Registered
 
Posts: 1161
Joined: March 31st, 2010, 1:05 pm
Location: Swansea and sometimes Kent

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby StokeySue » February 12th, 2018, 3:00 pm

Yes, printed onto heavy soft cotton, I think 4 (but might be another number) bands of colour down each side, forming a sort of check were they crossed at the corners

I've always thought they looked rather like glass cloths, there may have been slight variations on the theme
Sue
User avatar
StokeySue
Registered
 
Posts: 19020
Joined: April 21st, 2010, 5:18 pm
Location: Stoke Newington (London)

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby Herbidacious » February 12th, 2018, 10:22 pm

Like this?

vintage-french-linen-damask-tablecloth-for-farmhouse-table-turkey-red-border-fringe-Laurel-Leaf-Farm-item-no-nt725189-1.jpg
User avatar
Herbidacious
Registered
 
Posts: 4798
Joined: August 11th, 2012, 2:48 pm
Location: South East London, and occasionally Normandy

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby StokeySue » February 12th, 2018, 10:37 pm

No, no fringing on the one I know, and no broken stripes, but I expect every possible mill in Lancashire made a version
Sue
User avatar
StokeySue
Registered
 
Posts: 19020
Joined: April 21st, 2010, 5:18 pm
Location: Stoke Newington (London)

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby StokeySue » February 12th, 2018, 11:04 pm

Managed to find a decent picture of the one in the Pier Master's house

Image

Taken from Shortbread and Ginger blog
http://shortbreadandginger.blogspot.co.uk/2011/07/piermasters-house-liverpool.html
Sue
User avatar
StokeySue
Registered
 
Posts: 19020
Joined: April 21st, 2010, 5:18 pm
Location: Stoke Newington (London)

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby Meganthemog » February 13th, 2018, 11:31 am

No mine is much more decorative and on a really heavy cotton.
Meganthemog
Registered
 
Posts: 1161
Joined: March 31st, 2010, 1:05 pm
Location: Swansea and sometimes Kent

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby liketocook » February 13th, 2018, 11:57 am

StokeySue wrote:Managed to find a decent picture of the one in the Pier Master's house

Image

Taken from Shortbread and Ginger blog
http://shortbreadandginger.blogspot.co.uk/2011/07/piermasters-house-liverpool.html


Oh my Gran had one very like that, in fact she had a few (yellow, green & blue I think). They were her every day tablecloths, lace was kept for high days and holidays :) .
liketocook
Registered
 
Posts: 1833
Joined: December 31st, 2009, 5:05 pm
Location: south ayrshire - scotland

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby StokeySue » February 13th, 2018, 12:34 pm

Yes, very much everday, best were embroidered by my (great?) grandma, and had scalloped edges
Those must have been pretty standard too as I've seen the same daisy design all over the place, even in South Africa
Sue
User avatar
StokeySue
Registered
 
Posts: 19020
Joined: April 21st, 2010, 5:18 pm
Location: Stoke Newington (London)

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby StokeySue » February 13th, 2018, 12:37 pm

The last one in good condition
IMG_20180213_1235066_rewind.jpg
Sue
User avatar
StokeySue
Registered
 
Posts: 19020
Joined: April 21st, 2010, 5:18 pm
Location: Stoke Newington (London)

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby Herbidacious » February 13th, 2018, 2:25 pm

My grandfather had a small business making linen table cloths, handkerchiefs and the like. Everyone (including his son-in-law's mother aka Grandma) had table linen from him, so we didn't have anything like this. I do have one of his table clothes (actually the only thing I have of his), which has a yellowy orange border, but not that many stripes. Possibly two. Perhaps he was copying it somewhat.
User avatar
Herbidacious
Registered
 
Posts: 4798
Joined: August 11th, 2012, 2:48 pm
Location: South East London, and occasionally Normandy

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby liketocook » February 13th, 2018, 5:15 pm

StokeySue wrote:The last one in good condition
IMG_20180213_1235066_rewind.jpg

My Gran had pillowcases like that and tea tray cloths, they must have been the "in thing" :)
liketocook
Registered
 
Posts: 1833
Joined: December 31st, 2009, 5:05 pm
Location: south ayrshire - scotland

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby suffolk » February 13th, 2018, 6:47 pm

I embroidered many of those when I was a child
“One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.”
― Virginia Woolf
User avatar
suffolk
Registered
 
Posts: 36604
Joined: August 11th, 2010, 6:47 am
Location: East Anglia, surprisingly!

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby Seatallan » February 13th, 2018, 7:12 pm

liketocook wrote:My Gran had pillowcases like that and tea tray cloths


Mine too! Really brings back memories. :luv:
Food, Felines and Fells (in no particular order)
User avatar
Seatallan
Registered
 
Posts: 8819
Joined: April 1st, 2010, 3:28 pm
Location: Reading

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby Ratatouille » February 13th, 2018, 7:38 pm

Gran woukd have had a fit at anytable cloth as crunpled as that :lol:

However the cooker in the kitchen ineterests me. I have an almost identical minature one which came from my dolls house made by Dad. I belive some of the furniture came from auction sales. After the war Mum was a real haunter of sale rooms.
Je pense, donc je suis. - Decartes
Ratatouille
Registered
 
Posts: 7063
Joined: August 23rd, 2013, 11:48 am

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby Busybee » February 13th, 2018, 9:59 pm

Another enjoyable episode, I love how they all embraced the food, even when either the name, cow heel pie, or the look of the food - mock roe on toast was challenging.

It was touching how they all realised that what they enjoyed the most about the period was the togetherness and sense of family it created.

BB
Busybee
Registered
 
Posts: 3215
Joined: December 29th, 2012, 10:25 pm
Location: Manchester & North Yorkshire

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby liketocook » February 13th, 2018, 10:59 pm

Really enjoyed tonight's episode - lots of things that were still about when I was wee( the glass bowls, tinned veg salad, the tin openers and cookers to name a few things) and my Mum & Dad were big dancers, one of my first memories is "jiving" with my folks - I must have been just a young toddler. Although we didn't have much it was happy times :D
liketocook
Registered
 
Posts: 1833
Joined: December 31st, 2009, 5:05 pm
Location: south ayrshire - scotland

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby TeresaFoodie » February 14th, 2018, 8:39 am

Such good viewing last night! My mum's growing up era, but unfortunately her TV isn't working at the moment so I was relaying by text what they were talking about. Gas ovens with grill over head, the introduction of TVs in the 50's, adverts, the NHS, jiving to Rock Around The Clock. Mum said 'those were the days'. I can believe it. After such a horrific war who wouldn't want to let their hair down at the first opportunity?
I either win, or I learn
User avatar
TeresaFoodie
Registered
 
Posts: 2943
Joined: May 7th, 2017, 11:00 am
Location: Dunstabubble, UK

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby Sloe-Gin » February 14th, 2018, 9:00 am

The family in this series 'make' it for me. They embrace everything so positively. Those kids will go far in life.

One thing I remember from the 1950s, was the giant leg of ham my gran used to make for our family get togethers. She spent hours cooking it, then rolled in in some vivid orange breadcrumbs. There was always home made Piccalilli with it, which clashed horribly!! But tasted divine!
Eat, drink and be merry
User avatar
Sloe-Gin
Registered
 
Posts: 6404
Joined: December 31st, 2009, 3:33 pm
Location: North Wales

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby Ratatouille » February 14th, 2018, 9:53 am

We enjoyed last night's episode, especially as it finished in 1959, the year we celebrate today!
You are right about family closeness LTC. Although I am an only child Mum and Dad came from big and close families and we always seemed to be celebrating something together.

Watching that I realise that both Mr R and I lived very comfortable lives really. We had a fridge and hot running water long before that and by 1953 one of my uncles had a television - he built it himself. It was around that that time that I ditched the new -look fashions with the net underskirts dipped in sugar solution in favour of such fashion delights of the sack dress, causing a bit of a stir when i wore one for the 6th form l dance. :lol: :lol: It was not very easy to jive in one!
Je pense, donc je suis. - Decartes
Ratatouille
Registered
 
Posts: 7063
Joined: August 23rd, 2013, 11:48 am

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby beldubby » February 14th, 2018, 5:58 pm

Coming to this very late as I have spent most of the day drying out from getting soaked this morning. I am sure I noticed crinkle cut crisps in the section at the end of this episode. Surely not readily available in 1959?
beldubby
Registered
 
Posts: 44
Joined: March 31st, 2010, 7:00 am
Location: Cornwall

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby suffolk » February 14th, 2018, 6:22 pm

I agree ... Ma had a slicer with a wavy blade for cutting fancy game chips back when I was very young, so I suppose they could have been 'home made' but I certainly don't remember anything other than plain Smiths crisps with salt in the little blue twist, and no crinkles.
“One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.”
― Virginia Woolf
User avatar
suffolk
Registered
 
Posts: 36604
Joined: August 11th, 2010, 6:47 am
Location: East Anglia, surprisingly!

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby Amber » February 14th, 2018, 9:29 pm

Yes I noticed the crinkle cut crisps too.

I also noticed a very modern cooker hood in one shot... but after watching it for a second time, I think they were maybe in a kitchen showroom, not their original kitchen?
Amber
Registered
 
Posts: 749
Joined: November 9th, 2010, 6:42 pm

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby patpoyntz » February 14th, 2018, 9:46 pm

I thought I glimpsed a red pepper in one scene...now maybe we were a bit backward on Tyneside, but I don’t remember peppers of any colour until maybe 1965ish, maybe later.
patpoyntz
Registered
 
Posts: 520
Joined: February 9th, 2014, 5:26 pm

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby suffolk » February 14th, 2018, 9:50 pm

I remember seeing my first pepper ... I must have been about 13 and the art teacher had brought one in for us to draw ... Must have been 1964 ish.
“One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.”
― Virginia Woolf
User avatar
suffolk
Registered
 
Posts: 36604
Joined: August 11th, 2010, 6:47 am
Location: East Anglia, surprisingly!

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby patpoyntz » February 14th, 2018, 9:57 pm

Do you remember if that was red or green Suffs, I seem to remember that green ones appeared first. Mind you I wasn’t married then, and had little interest in cooking.....
patpoyntz
Registered
 
Posts: 520
Joined: February 9th, 2014, 5:26 pm

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby earthmaiden » February 14th, 2018, 11:39 pm

We wondered about the crinkle cut crisps and a couple of other things too. The cooker in 1945 looked more like circa mid-60's or later too but maybe they couldn't get a really old one.

A good series though and nice to see the family not being stupid about things they were not familiar with.

We still didn't have running hot water in our house in Norfolk in 1967. My parents, born on the early '20's, had been used to it all their lives before we moved there.

On the subject of embroidered tray and tablecloths, I too embroidered a few as a child, which I still have. I quite liked doing embroidery and would love to start it again but think my eyesight would be too poor.
User avatar
earthmaiden
Registered
 
Posts: 9690
Joined: April 2nd, 2010, 8:36 pm
Location: Wiltshire. UK

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby StokeySue » February 15th, 2018, 1:09 am

They did say in the first one that the range wasn't entirely authentic asit had to meet current regulations, and I wonder if it woukd have been the same with a gas cooker built for town gas, not natural gas? I know the oldest ones couldn't be adapted to natural gas
Sue
User avatar
StokeySue
Registered
 
Posts: 19020
Joined: April 21st, 2010, 5:18 pm
Location: Stoke Newington (London)

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby suffolk » February 15th, 2018, 6:38 am

The first pepper my classmates and I saw was green
It was quite some time before we saw red ones.
Talking of the old gas cookers ... does anyone remember the old gas fridges? My granny had one ... pretty sure she had it in the early fifties ... maybe even earlier.
“One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.”
― Virginia Woolf
User avatar
suffolk
Registered
 
Posts: 36604
Joined: August 11th, 2010, 6:47 am
Location: East Anglia, surprisingly!

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby Ratatouille » February 15th, 2018, 9:35 am

suffolk wrote:The first pepper my classmates and I saw was green
It was quite some time before we saw red ones.
Talking of the old gas cookers ... does anyone remember the old gas fridges? My granny had one ... pretty sure she had it in the early fifties ... maybe even earlier.


I too remember drawing peppers, in fact I found several of my college sketch books in the big sort out, and there it is ! I had already seen them before - this was the very early 60's because I was at college in London and saw all sorts of things I hadn't seen in Newcastle ;) ;)
When I first went to Mr R's family in Somerset (1960) I encountered spinach, kale and curry for the first time, not to mention clotted cream and bath buns! In the other had oop north Mr R discovered tripe, swedes leek pudding, pease puddn' and stotty cake.

Mum's first fridge was a gas one - oddly an Electrolux it was in the brand new council house we moved into in 1947. It had an inside bathroom and loo ut still had an outside netty, a coal house and a shed. When we went to Long island in 1966 the government kindly provided us, eventually, with a gas fridge - another Electrolux which was fine as long as the gas bottle didn't run out and nofresh ones had arrived because the mail-boat captain was drunk again.
Je pense, donc je suis. - Decartes
Ratatouille
Registered
 
Posts: 7063
Joined: August 23rd, 2013, 11:48 am

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby StokeySue » February 15th, 2018, 11:33 am

Even when I came to London in 1972 raw peppers were green, though canned were red.
I was quite surprised when I first saw a fresh peach in 1962 in Francr, only available in a small market town in Hampshire if you grew your own. The fuzz astonished me
Sue
User avatar
StokeySue
Registered
 
Posts: 19020
Joined: April 21st, 2010, 5:18 pm
Location: Stoke Newington (London)

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby suffolk » February 15th, 2018, 11:48 am

StokeySue wrote:though canned were red.


Canned!!!!!!!!! you saw canned peppers in the 60s??????????? :shock: :lol:
“One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.”
― Virginia Woolf
User avatar
suffolk
Registered
 
Posts: 36604
Joined: August 11th, 2010, 6:47 am
Location: East Anglia, surprisingly!

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby earthmaiden » February 15th, 2018, 12:13 pm

I saw my first green pepper (sliced) in a salad in an Italian restaurant in Kensington circa 1965. I didn't see another for about 10 years (apart from our spell in Australia) and green was the only option for a very long time. I can't remember a time that there weren't peaches for a short while each summer. Pre 1960, my father worked in Soho and often came home with very nice exotic fruit from the stalls round there. My mother adored peaches. Once, he brought a pineapple home - such excitement!

Isn't it interesting how differently people lived right through to the late 20th century. In Swindon, a working railway town, there are rows of small terraced houses and people in them didn't have bathrooms with internal plumbing until the council gave out grants to have them built during the 1970's. They had flushing loos out the back much earlier on as there has been urban mains drainage for many years. I expect it was the same in similar industrial towns. I think that even my grandparents in London had bathrooms with internal plumbing by the early 1900's but I am not sure what the early methods of heating water were.
User avatar
earthmaiden
Registered
 
Posts: 9690
Joined: April 2nd, 2010, 8:36 pm
Location: Wiltshire. UK

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby StokeySue » February 15th, 2018, 12:42 pm

suffolk wrote:
StokeySue wrote:though canned were red.


Canned!!!!!!!!! you saw canned peppers in the 60s??????????? :shock: :lol:

In 1972
I was shopping in Hampstead (posh, foodie) Camden (Cypriot) or Soho (Italian) not the shires ;)
Sue
User avatar
StokeySue
Registered
 
Posts: 19020
Joined: April 21st, 2010, 5:18 pm
Location: Stoke Newington (London)

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby scullion » February 15th, 2018, 1:09 pm

we had an electrolux gas fridge in the early sixties and green pepper slices in the salad bowls at school in the late sixties.
i agree about the stove, i thought it was a bit of an anachronism. we bought a second hand one very similar to that in the mid nineties. we have a friend in london who cooks on a gas stove that would have been very much closer to the era portrayed.
my mother's new world range cooker, ordered at the festival of britain, was converted to natural gas from town gas.
User avatar
scullion
Registered
 
Posts: 11873
Joined: April 9th, 2010, 2:08 pm
Location: cornwall

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby patpoyntz » February 15th, 2018, 1:36 pm

We had peaches in the late 40’s....probably seasonal. I know because I loved them so much my nickname was ‘peachy’, and I dont suppose that would have lasted much after I started school in 1949.
patpoyntz
Registered
 
Posts: 520
Joined: February 9th, 2014, 5:26 pm

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby TeresaFoodie » February 16th, 2018, 7:40 am

This thread is bringing back some forgotten food memories!

I have a Cordon Bleu cookery book bought for me early eighties for about 50p at a boot sale! That's when my cookery book obsession kicked in. In it were photos of dishes using kidney and other offal which I am sure contributed to me turning veggie at around the same time. I was doing Food and Nutrition CSE at school and used this book a lot for inspiration. I recall seeing a recipe, maybe not in that particular book but definitely in that era, for halved grapefruit grilled with sugar and a glace cherry. I felt so sophisticated making it. Tinned fruit was a big part of my growing up as a teenager. Tinned mandarin segments on top of my first cheesecake. I couldn't believe I'd made a cheesecake and couldn't believe it had actual cheese in it but didn't taste of cheese! Tinned fruit cocktail on a Sunday at my grandparents was a regular thing. Who's going to get the one gooseberry? Tinned peach halves with tinned condensed milk (cream?). :sprout: I suppose a slimy dessert is better than no dessert? Debatable...

I don't remember ever seeing tinned peppers.
I either win, or I learn
User avatar
TeresaFoodie
Registered
 
Posts: 2943
Joined: May 7th, 2017, 11:00 am
Location: Dunstabubble, UK

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby Herbidacious » February 16th, 2018, 8:20 pm

My sister didn't have a bathroom in her first flat c. 1984. Outside loo in the yard. The landlord had put a shower cubicle in the bathroom!
User avatar
Herbidacious
Registered
 
Posts: 4798
Joined: August 11th, 2012, 2:48 pm
Location: South East London, and occasionally Normandy

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby liketocook » February 21st, 2018, 9:24 am

My gran had the wallpaper in last night's episode :D , it was a real memory stirrer. My Papa had put it up and there was a wee bit in the corner that was out of sync which he refused to redo as it would mean buying another roll. It drove my Gran nuts :)
liketocook
Registered
 
Posts: 1833
Joined: December 31st, 2009, 5:05 pm
Location: south ayrshire - scotland

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby liketocook » February 21st, 2018, 9:25 am

liketocook wrote:My gran had the wallpaper in last night's episode :D , it was a real memory stirrer. My Papa had put it up and there was a wee bit in the corner that was out of sync which he refused to redo as it would mean buying another roll. It drove my Gran nuts :)


ETA - we also had the same oval steak plates, though not until the 70s, they were pyrex and my Dad still has one that get regular use :)
liketocook
Registered
 
Posts: 1833
Joined: December 31st, 2009, 5:05 pm
Location: south ayrshire - scotland

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby Pepper Pig » February 21st, 2018, 9:28 am

Hrrmph. Coronation Street is NOT the longest running soap in the world. That accolade belongs to The Archers. 8-)
User avatar
Pepper Pig
Registered
 
Posts: 6030
Joined: June 9th, 2014, 7:18 pm
Location: Harrow-on-the-Hill

Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby Busybee » February 21st, 2018, 9:40 am

The Pyrex bowls were familiar, as were the tea, coffee and sugar canisters. Either they were around for years or we had them a very long time as I remember them from the 70’s.

The decor/furnishings were familiar. I was born in 1965 and Mum used her maternity grant to buy a Hoover instamatic washing machine, very cutting edge at the time.......I think it helped that Dad was an electrician in a Hoover retailers. We had that washer for years, I can vividly remember the blue programme key you used to slide into a slot to select the programme. My mum worked in the family business before and after I was born it was only inthe 70’s and after my sister was born that she gave up work to become a housewife.

I hadn’t considered the social isolation that housewives would have felt, much is made of the swinging 60’s but less about the loss of community that many sections of society endured. My aunt and uncle emigrated in the 60’s, first to Kenya working for the UK government and then to Australia in the 70’s. The blue aerogramme became a fixture in our lives for many years until international telephone calls became affordable.....not really until the 90’s.

BB
Busybee
Registered
 
Posts: 3215
Joined: December 29th, 2012, 10:25 pm
Location: Manchester & North Yorkshire

PreviousNext

Return to The Coffee Shop

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 11 guests