Back In Time for Tea

Order yourself a latte, and a pastry (The virtual cinnamon buns are excellent today). And have a nice chat.

Back In Time for Tea

Postby earthmaiden » February 6th, 2018, 4:19 pm

This starts tonight - a 'northern' version of the one with the silly woman that we all watched last year or the year before.

It will either be very good or very annoying ... looking forward to hearing comments from those Wildies who grew up in the northern counties!

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b09rdv80
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Re: Back in Time for Tea

Postby Busybee » February 6th, 2018, 5:39 pm

My northern roots and taste buds are on standby!

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Re: Back in Time for Tea

Postby TeresaFoodie » February 6th, 2018, 9:05 pm

I am so glad I saw this thread because I missed this in the TV guide. I love this sort of thing and wasn't disappointed. I have no connections with the north at all, so most of the local 'delicacy' names I've never heard of. My granddad was born in 1920 in London and when I was growing up would often hear him sing the Ilkley Moor song! I look forward to the next episode.

Out of interest, is tripe still something that is popular today, up north or anywhere else?
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Re: Back in Time for Tea

Postby mum-at-the-oven » February 6th, 2018, 9:30 pm

I much preferred this programme, so far to the previous one.

I think it's probably because the Northern family are more normal - i.e. working class - than the Southerners with their hired help in the previous series with Mum a bit clueless.
I have no to axe to grind, I am East London born and have no family connection with Northern England but they just seemed more - well - normal


It seems to me that "The great North/South divide" isn't really North/South at all but really "class divide"
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Re: Back in Time for Tea

Postby Suelle » February 6th, 2018, 9:33 pm

mum-at-the-oven wrote:
It seems to me that "The great North/South divide" isn't really North/South at all but really "class divide"


Exactly what I was thinking!

It was better without Giles Coren too, who can sometimes be a bit patronising.
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Re: Back in Time for Tea

Postby earthmaiden » February 6th, 2018, 9:49 pm

I preferred it too, the family seemed more sensible which helped. I was disappointed that they covered two decades in one programme rather than covering one in more detail but thought generally it was quite good and that some quite wholesome meals were produced.

Tezza - tripe is definitely a 'love it or hate it' thing but many dismiss it without even trying it. I have tried it more than once and find it has a very distinctive taste - which I don't care for.
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Re: Back in Time for Tea

Postby Herbidacious » February 6th, 2018, 10:16 pm

I just read they are from Low Moor. Some of my family come from there way back. Will catch it on iPlayer at some point.
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Re: Back in Time for Tea

Postby suffolk » February 6th, 2018, 10:40 pm

I love tripe ... I made Trippa parmigiana just the other day :chops:
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Re: Back in Time for Tea

Postby Busybee » February 6th, 2018, 10:55 pm

I thought it was a much better programme, the family were more relatable, it also helped that the Mum seems to be a decent cook and engaged in cooking things she hadn’t experienced before.

I thought the comment ‘is it a pasta machine’ priceless! I have only seen Sara Cox on the Great British Pottery Throwndown previously, but I thought she makes a good presenter. I enjoyed her using the pigs bladder as a football and turning it into a green initiative :lol:

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Re: Back in Time for Tea

Postby PatsyMFagan » February 7th, 2018, 9:25 am

Busybee wrote:I have only seen Sara Cox on the Great British Pottery Throwndown previously, but I thought she makes a good presenter.


Sara Cox is/was a radio 1 DJ and now presents a programme on bbc2 - (sounds of) the 80's .. I too got to like her in GB PT ... she has a very quirky sense of humour :tu:
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Re: Back in Time for Tea

Postby suffolk » February 7th, 2018, 9:55 am

I thought the whole family were delightful ... so much more interested in what they were doing and more thoughtful about what it really must have been like and relating it to their own life experience. Loved the pasta maker comment :lol: :tu:

I felt that the 'other lot' were just too aware that they were on tv and the mum was so insistent on presenting herself as so "modern, sophisticated and educated that she couldn't even work a tin opener" that she came over really as 'a bit thick' which she probably wasn't at all.

I also can't imagine the son in the other family being willing to blow up and play with a pigs bladder ...
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Re: Back in Time for Tea

Postby Hope » February 7th, 2018, 12:54 pm

it's like a trip down memory lane. Not the food. And we're southern! They had one of my mum's old crockery sets in the opening credits, mum said the black saucepans were like the ones her Gran had. They used the song I walked down the aisle to.

The food looks repulsive, though. But I do love a bit of social history.
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Re: Back in Time for Tea

Postby StokeySue » February 7th, 2018, 1:16 pm

I recorded the programme but haven't watched it yet
I saw the family on BBC breakfast and wasn't overwhelmed by them but happy to give it a try

However this discussion is putting me off, so judgmental of people only seen on TV and a nasty tinge of inverted snobbery. Some posts I am finding rather offensive.

There was a time in the eighties when inverted snobbery was seen as somehow PC and therefore OK, while people like Jacob R-M were offensive. I hoped we'd got past that.
Personally I find all snobbery a form of niggling prejudice that is really unpleasant.

Can we discuss the programmes, the food and the social history without some of the shading? Pretty please?
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Re: Back in Time for Tea

Postby Pepper Pig » February 7th, 2018, 1:37 pm

I’m just watching it. It is certainly more entertaining than Giles, Rochelle and her family which, in my mind, did at least one series too far. But it all looks a bit too posh for a working class family. OH keeps shouting at the TV that his grandpa never had this and that but that might be going back pre this programme as he is nearly 84, and they lived in Eltham which is not Up North.

The boy is annoying me . . . .

My mother’s mangle wasn’t kept outside.
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Re: Back in Time for Tea

Postby earthmaiden » February 7th, 2018, 2:29 pm

We all have different memories of the past and of people we knew who had lived in an even more distant past, I doubt any programme could ever get it exactly right, let alone to please us all. Rich or poor, life and expectations today, especially amongst younger generations are different and it is sometimes hard to understand the mindsets of the time which would have had very different influences. I think you have to just take these programmes for what they are. I don't think that the family in the previous series was a good choice, wherever they came from.

I had never seen a mangle kept outdoors, it would get dirty - but I didn't know people who lived in cramped urban conditions either. If there was no outhouse and only a small kitchen then there wouldn't be anywhere else to keep it.

Did anyone think that the addition of cheese to the tripe dish made it a bit extravagant for people who were really struggling to feed a family?
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Re: Back in Time for Tea

Postby mum-at-the-oven » February 7th, 2018, 3:54 pm

Our mangle was kept outside - the kitchen was only small and had a full size bath in it - but - we didn't have hot water :rolleyes:
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Re: Back in Time for Tea

Postby TeresaFoodie » February 7th, 2018, 4:08 pm

I've never seen a mangle other than in a museum, but my 'Little Nanny' still had an outside toilet where she lived in Clapham right up until she died in the mid-late eighties.

Running out of coal must have been hard. Bread based and other foods could always be eaten cold, but not being able to make a hot cup of tea must have been quite annoying.
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Re: Tricks and tips for new users:

Postby aero280 » February 7th, 2018, 6:23 pm

How did this "Back in Time for Tea" thread get into the "Tips and Tricks for New Users" Thread?

I'll try and split the thread, but it may not go well...
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Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby suffolk » February 7th, 2018, 6:37 pm

:kneel: thanks Will :tu:

I think Suelle was trying to merge this thread with a similar one started by Sloe-gin ........ and something went wrong and she lost this one ... I found it by accident :?
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Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby PatsyMFagan » February 7th, 2018, 6:40 pm

Pepper Pig wrote:My mother’s mangle wasn’t kept outside.


MY Mum's was, but under a small lean-to as protection against the elements .. There was no room in the scullery (her name for the kitchen even though we lived in a 1948 built (council) house )
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Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby Suelle » February 7th, 2018, 6:53 pm

aero280 wrote:How did this "Back in Time for Tea" thread get into the "Tips and Tricks for New Users" Thread?

I'll try and split the thread, but it may not go well...


Thanks for restoring it. I'm not going to do any more tweaking, in case I do more damage.
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Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby aero280 » February 7th, 2018, 8:26 pm

I'm glad it worked. Splitting the top went OK. But when I've tried merging topics, I've always ended up doing it the wrong way around... :rolleyes:
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Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby aero280 » February 7th, 2018, 8:31 pm

My grandparents had a cast iron mangle with big wooden rollers. It was kept outdoors.

When I was three years old, I was "helping" with the washing. I was pulling the sheets through and helping them into the basket. One came through with a crease in it and mother instinctively turned the mangle backwards to remove it - taking my left hand with it!! :terrified:

I still have the scars. It was my first ever visit to what was then the Casualty Dept...
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Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby Amber » February 7th, 2018, 9:36 pm

I’m another who thought they were quite well-off for working class, but my main memory of the programme was the amount of laughter. What a lovely happy family. :D
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Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby StokeySue » February 7th, 2018, 10:17 pm

I'm finding it quite interesting but my Dad always used to say the big error all these programmes made is to give even poor people a range. My grandmother cooked on a hob grate until 1932, when they moved; ranges were for the relatively well off. I'm quite inclined to email Polly Russell
If you baked, it was in a Dutch oven, not a cauldron but like a biscuit tin with shelves that hung on the bars of the grate
Hob grate and Dutch Oven
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I do like Sara Cox, she's good in this IMO
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Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby suffolk » February 7th, 2018, 10:23 pm

That suet and bacon roll was almost the same as the Bedfordshire Clanger that Ma used to make - but hers weren't slimy - they didn't use enough well greased grease proof paper before wrapping it in the pudding cloth.
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Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby StokeySue » February 7th, 2018, 10:30 pm

Would theyhave had a supply of fresh greaseproof paper? You'd have to buy it at the shop, and older recipes do tell you to put the pudden directly into a well floured cloth... not sure she floured it, but we seem to be getting less detail of the cooking this time around.
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Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby suffolk » February 8th, 2018, 8:51 am

Ma and Grandma used to save the paper that butter, cheese and other stuff such as ham and bacon was wrapped in by the shopkeepers ... there was always a stash of grease proof paper wrappings folded and stored in an old chipped casserole in the cold larder for use when making steamed puddings etc.

Ma never bought a roll of grease proof in her life (don't think she knew such things existed) ... 'money doesn't grow on trees!' :rolleyes:
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Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby TeresaFoodie » February 8th, 2018, 9:04 am

It's amazing what you can do to save money and to reuse certain items when you either have no chance of buying or no money to buy.

My Sainsbury's have stopped giving away brown paper bags for mushrooms, but Lidl give away brown long bags for their baguettes to be placed in, so I save those for my mushrooms. I am sure my nan used to save butter wrappers but she rarely made suet puddings so not sure what she saved them for. And there was always a dish of dripping on the kitchen windowsill from the roast meat and it always had brown flecks in it. I was never tempted to smear it on toast but everyone else in my family did. I'll pick mum's brains today when I see her. I'm sure she'll have more memories than I have.
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Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby StokeySue » February 8th, 2018, 9:08 am

My Mum kept butter papers but not those from other foods
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Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby Zosherooney » February 8th, 2018, 9:19 am

I have not watched the programme but my Nan kept a mangle outside, no space inside, and the kitchen table was a large piece of wood over the bath in the kitchen, the wood came off once a week ! Loo was brick built at the end of the garden, full of old dusty cobwebs, it felt very damp.

I save the greaseproof paper from puff pastry and butter papers. I have not bought a roll of the stuff for decades.... :oops:
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Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby liketocook » February 8th, 2018, 9:23 am

I still keep butter papers for greasing or popping over potato bakes etc.
I watched this last night and the house set up is very much what my house would have looked like when it was first built.
One thing I noticed though was fitted carpets, even when I was growing up in the 60s/70s fitted carpets were only really just becoming common place. Many houses still had large square carpets surrounded by lino in most rooms, though possibly a fitted one in the living room. When we bought this house in 1991 only the front room had a fitted carpet laid.
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Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby StokeySue » February 8th, 2018, 9:27 am

I remember carpets in the centre of the room with the boards round the edge stained (Ronseal!). Looks rather sad when you lift the carpet
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Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby liketocook » February 8th, 2018, 9:29 am

StokeySue wrote:I remember carpets in the centre of the room with the boards round the edge stained (Ronseal!). Looks rather sad when you lift the carpet

It was the same with the lino only went from the wall to just under the carpet edge. The carpet was glued to the lino so nothing moved about.
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Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby Busybee » February 8th, 2018, 10:03 am

We must be very retro, our front room in our 19th century cottage has bare boards and a large rug in the middle! Although all our boards are treated and waxed.

One point that has caused conversation is the destination of their holiday.........my Dad says Blackpool would have been realistic, I contend that no true Yorkshireman would have spent their hard earned brass in Lancashire! :lol: my vote is for Scarborough, looking at a map they are probably equal distance, I know all the Lancashire mill workers went to Blackpool but I don’t know about Yorkshire ones.

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Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby suffolk » February 8th, 2018, 10:12 am

Pa's first job after leaving school in the mid 30s was on the cheese counter in Sainsburys grocers ... having been well trained because of the wrapping of cheese in greaseproof, he was a dab hand at wrapping Christmas presents ... it was always his job and he trained me although I never reached his standard of crisply creased edges and perfect points.
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Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby Badger's mate » February 8th, 2018, 10:24 am

As a toddler I managed to put my hands on top of the range at Grandma's :rolleyes: , an early trip to the North Middlesex hospital some time around 1960 I imagine. My Grandparents lived two doors apart, in both cases the scullery had the copper for washing and an Ascot too. There was a rudimentary lean-to outside the back door, the coal-hole, mangle and bath were outside, although I can remember one place had the coal (it must have been smokeless fuel by then) under the stairs, but can't remember which house it was.
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Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby liketocook » February 8th, 2018, 11:00 am

Busybee wrote:We must be very retro, our front room in our 19th century cottage has bare boards and a large rug in the middle! Although all our boards are treated and waxed.

One point that has caused conversation is the destination of their holiday.........my Dad says Blackpool would have been realistic, I contend that no true Yorkshireman would have spent their hard earned brass in Lancashire! :lol: my vote is for Scarborough, looking at a map they are probably equal distance, I know all the Lancashire mill workers went to Blackpool but I don’t know about Yorkshire ones.

BB


I think it has come back again my front room is the same. My grandparents/parents would have been horrified at just the floorboards though, funny how tastes change :) .
I was expecting Scarborough as well, certainly when I lived in York Scarborough was the go to place on Bank Holidays and extra trains ran.
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Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby mum-at-the-oven » February 8th, 2018, 11:09 am

Am I recalling correctly that in the previous series that Dad did the cooking in "real" life? If so it calls into question why they chose that particular family to take part!
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Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby StokeySue » February 8th, 2018, 11:45 am

I was thinking about that too mato

I think possibly they thought there would be more to wat h on TV if she had to do it from scratch? They are certainly showing less time and detail of what goes on in the kitchen this series
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Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby scullion » February 8th, 2018, 11:58 am

mum-at-the-oven wrote:Am I recalling correctly that in the previous series that Dad did the cooking in "real" life? If so it calls into question why they chose that particular family to take part!

do you not think that it was to show that many middle class houses had a maid/cook, and with the change in society through the century, it necessitated women who were unused to domesticity having to cope in the foreign land of the kitchen?
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Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby Zosherooney » February 8th, 2018, 12:07 pm

I wish we'd had a maid, I might not have had to do so much washing up !
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Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby suffolk » February 8th, 2018, 12:14 pm

Granny had a maid for the first 20 years or so of her married life ... which as you say, meant that Granny had to learn to cook when Olive left and went to work for the war effort ... Granny's success in the kitchen was limited and when we went to visit we ran the gauntlet of under-cooked roast chicken and charcoal-enveloped sausages :scared:
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Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby scullion » February 8th, 2018, 12:17 pm

my mother was an early adopter of the dishwasher - i can't remember having to avoid the washing up after i was about ten.

suffolk wrote:Granny had a maid for the first 20 years or so of her married life ... which as you say, meant that Granny had to learn to cook when Olive left and went to work for the war effort ... Granny's success in the kitchen was limited and when we went to visit we ran the gauntlet of under-cooked roast chicken and charcoal-enveloped sausages :scared:


which was very much like the mother in the last series, huh, suffolk?
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Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby suffolk » February 8th, 2018, 12:34 pm

Very true :rolleyes:
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Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby Gruney » February 8th, 2018, 12:45 pm

Is anything known about the maid in the last series? I assume she was a professional in the catering trade, from the way she handled things. I also thought she was extremely engaging - a TV natural, and we would have seen a lot more of her after the series had finished.
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Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby TeresaFoodie » February 8th, 2018, 6:02 pm

Mum was reminded by me today of her mum keeping butter packets and tells me she folded them up and next time they had a roast, minus the meat as was quite often the case, she would open up the wrappers and lay them fat side down in the oven so that all the fat would melt into the potatoes, as it was difficult to scrape every scrap off with a knife.

She also remembers the hard paper toilet rolls, which were apparently a treat as opposed to squares of newspaper hung up on a butchers hook. She recalled scrunching the paper to use after a wee and it merely acted as a funnel which guided said wee up the arm. Mother! :lol:
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Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby Zosherooney » February 8th, 2018, 6:06 pm

Izal Tezza... I can remember it
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Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby Grasshopper » February 8th, 2018, 8:43 pm

Busybee wrote:One point that has caused conversation is the destination of their holiday.........my Dad says Blackpool would have been realistic, I contend that no true Yorkshireman would have spent their hard earned brass in Lancashire! :lol: my vote is for Scarborough, looking at a map they are probably equal distance, I know all the Lancashire mill workers went to Blackpool but I don’t know about Yorkshire ones.


BB - So many bradford folk used to go to Morecambe (I know, Lancashire), that it was nicknamed 'Bradford By The Sea'. You can still get our local newspaper there!
Scarborough is great for a holiday, BUT it is quite hilly. Lovely beach tho!
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Re: Back In Time for Tea

Postby Suelle » February 8th, 2018, 10:10 pm

suffolk wrote:Granny had a maid for the first 20 years or so of her married life .......


My granny was in service as a maid, before she got married! :lol:
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Suelle
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