Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

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Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby jrc » March 2nd, 2019, 12:21 pm

It’s not often I am speechless. Due to me being somewhat incapacitated (broken collarbone) Bob offered to take me out for breakfast. We ended up at one of those places where you help yourself.

The usual suspects were there eg bacon, beans, sausage etc.

When I was at the front of the queue the server was replenishing the fried eggs and slopping them into the serving tray.

I held my plate forward in the hope that he would shove one on ( he had a fish slice ) and he looked me straight in the eye and said that it would be illegal on elf and safety grounds in case it caused a splashback??? :terrified: :terrified: :terrified:

We were more at risk using the glowing hot tongs to serve ourselves, using the commercial toaster with no instructions plus the urn for tea that had a big notice beside it indicating that it may contain hot water. :scared: :lol: :lol: :lol:

What is the most ridiculous things you have come up against recently in the name of h & s ??? :lol: :lol: :lol:
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby earthmaiden » March 2nd, 2019, 12:38 pm

It seems incredible doesn't it!

At work there is a company-wide database which lists all the accidents (some very serious) and near misses (which can be as little as slipping on a piece of paper which has fallen on the floor) for all to read. The idea being we get to think about H&S all the time and realise that the smallest things can have repercussions. I imagine in your case that someone has been splashed with a little hot fat at some point and they do not want the employee to be liable. Glowing hot tongs and instruction-less toaster do not sound good. I have to say that I now realise that the stupidist things can cause major repercussions and although such rules seem crazy they are usually for good reason (as well as the people not wanting to be liable!). I suppose, had you been on your own, you could have asked them to plate your breakfast and bring it over.
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby suffolk » March 2nd, 2019, 12:43 pm

I once slipped on a piece of paper (glossy) on a carpet .. I was carrying a package so hadn’t seen it ... I did the splits, knocked my kneecap badly and sprained an ankle (other leg) and was off work for a week as I couldn’t drive ... a hazard which shouldn’t be ignored! :shock:
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby Ratatouille » March 2nd, 2019, 2:08 pm

Our main supermarket is dreaful regarding trip hazzards etc. Becaue they don't have an early morning or twilight shift shelves are always being stacked while customers are busy trying to shop. We saw two incidents this week - not helped - it has to be admitted by customers trying to shop while talking on their mobiles.

One man walked straight into an open glass door to a chiller cabinet which had been left open by a stacker who in turn was chatteing to a friend.
Second was a fairly fit young man who stepped inot a piece of plastic from a pallet which had been left on the floor. He went base over apex in a rather dramatic fashion. No-one went to help apologized or did anything to remedy the hazards.
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby TeresaFoodie » March 2nd, 2019, 3:12 pm

That is pretty ridiculous about the egg jrc.

During the very icy snap about three weeks ago, our very uneven ground around the entrance and car park at work was not salted for three days until four of us had gone over walking to the main front door. That's health and safety gone backwards.

When I was recovering from fractures to the spine about a year ago and looking for something more comfortable to sleep on than a sofa bed, my dad ordered me a single bed to be delivered to my flat :luv: When it arrived the delivery drivers lifted it across the threshold into the communal ground floor hallway and refused to take it any further on grounds of health, safety and insurance in case they injured themselves on the stairs. So the communal entrance was blocked all day until I heard my 81 year old neighbour return from shopping and she helped me up with it. Well, we got the base up but we both felt fearful of our own safety when we attempted the mattress and another neighbour returning from work that evening did that bit. There's customer service for you - not.
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby StokeySue » March 2nd, 2019, 3:38 pm

It should perhaps be pointed out that even if that is what his supervisor told him it’s certainly not illegal for him to serve you an egg - many hotels have someone cooking eggs to order and serving them directly onto your plate. They probably just don’t want him to take the time to stand there serving people. The most stupid things done in the name of elfin safety are usually done in its name only - an excuse, not a real reason.

I worked in a lab. The most difficult thing to get across to people was that smoking and eating were banned not because of anything exciting like risk of explosion, it because just about everything was either toxic or infectious and touching your hand to your mouth was a really bad idea
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby jrc » March 2nd, 2019, 5:05 pm

:hug: :hug: :hug: This guy had come from the kitchen with a tray of fried eggs. There was no fat or oil on the tray and rather than shove one on my plate (good hand forward) he had to bypass my plate to slop them into the serving dish.

Under the circumstances with one arm in a sling in obvious view he could have made a decision. :rolleyes:
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby Seatallan » March 2nd, 2019, 5:05 pm

Talking of dangerous, I've come to the conclusion I'm a walking (or falling, actually) liability. Only this afternoon I managed to trip over a shoelace (which had come undone but I hadn't noticed until too late) whilst hurrying down main shopping street in town and did a spectacular prat-fall. Have a very painful wrist as a result. Ever since I was a child I've been prone to tripping and generally losing my balance. I blame it on having been born with a slightly clubbed foot that had to be corrected when I was little. It's a wonder I can manage to run and climb fells really. :rolleyes: :oops:
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby TeresaFoodie » March 2nd, 2019, 6:21 pm

jrc wrote::hug: :hug: :hug: This guy had come from the kitchen with a tray of fried eggs. There was no fat or oil on the tray and rather than shove one on my plate (good hand forward) he had to bypass my plate to slop them into the serving dish.

Under the circumstances with one arm in a sling in obvious view he could have made a decision. :rolleyes:


He could have put all of the eggs onto the serving dish and then carefully done the next bit for you seeing as you had the sling on. He probably rarely sees a customer wearing a sling though let alone knows how debilitating it is wearing one. I truly believe that this sort of thing should be incorporated into all workplace training when dealing with the general public. It would have taken him ten seconds if that. Unless you had a queue of sling wearers behind you of course...
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby Zosherooney » March 2nd, 2019, 6:25 pm

I have asked my builder if I can have different levels....No is the answer, the planners don't like them........ Elfin Safety.....

I had a conversation with my solicitor and his angle was..... we all have to be responsible for ourselves and not take on the American 'sue whoever you can' attitude.
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby StokeySue » March 2nd, 2019, 6:40 pm

Different levels of what Zosh?

There’s a fashion in places like hotel and office lobbies for having a hard floor such as wood block or tile then arranging some chairs, sofas, and low tables on a carpet - which is perfectly reasonable except that they have taken to putting the carpet on a raised dais. As the same interior designers like lighting to be “atmospheric” i.e. totally inadequate, it’s pretty dangerous - I don’t think you need to be as visually impaired as I am to fail to notice the step, wearing strongish varifocals or carrying a tray of drinks that hides your feet will do the trick

Stupid and thoughtless design... :evil:
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby Herbidacious » March 2nd, 2019, 6:50 pm

Yes it sounds like H&S in this case was being used as an excuse. A bit like (more than my) jobsworth used to be. (Remember That's Life?)

However, an employee might (possibly should, strictly speaking) get into trouble for contravening the H&S rules which his employer has set up - possibly even sacked. So it might literally be more than his job's worth, depending on how flexible the employer is.

re people lifting things (or not) you would think that if part of their job description was delivering heavy furniture, they would be able to carry things upstairs. i.e. being able to do so would be part of the list of requirements when they applied for the job, and they would have training for lifting things and thus would be complying with H&S guidelines. If they'd not had such training then they should not - it's easy to think you can lift something (or someone, in my case re. my parents a few times, cue wrenched shoulders and back pain for several weeks) but you can do yourself a lot of damage that way. Damaging themselves would mean they would be unable to do their job and thus possibly out of a job or on lower pay (and let's face it, these are not well-paid anyway.) Whether or not they need extra training for taking things upstairs, having got them out of the lorry, I don't know. Perhaps the company thinks they have to do a risk assessment of each individual case...?!

However, again it really sounds like they probably couldn't be arsed. Or you would have to pay extra to the company to have this service. Or, the company really does forbid any and all of its employees from carrying heavy and bulky things upstairs for fear of litigation when the bloke 'does his back in', as this is always a risk, even with training.

H&S does seem to be ore about protecting the employer, in the light of government legislation, rather than the employee or the customer sometimes.

Perhaps I should have taken my council to court for the slightly raised (slightly, thus not very visibly raised) manhole cover which I tripped over three times, sending me crashing onto my knees... (I did report it after the first instance, and of course, felt very stupid for tripping over it again, but I was not always terribly awake en route to work in the winter months when I used to catch the early train.)
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby Zosherooney » March 2nd, 2019, 6:52 pm

Different levels of floor.... ie. a step... I have watched US programmes on TV and like the idea of 1 or 2 steps down to a different level in a different room..... Apparently we are not allowed (think bubblewrap Britain) to have this option.... Although I do have a slight step (about 3/4 inches) from our lounge to the sunroom. This is defined by the laminate changing direction from one area to the other. The floorer did not get it when I insisted..... but on seeing the end result totally agreed with me that it was the right thing to do.
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby suffolk » March 2nd, 2019, 6:54 pm

Different levels in one room can be dangerous ... it’s how Pa broke his hip cos he was wearing his bifocals! :shock:
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby Zosherooney » March 2nd, 2019, 7:02 pm

We all need to take some degree of responsibility for ourselves.....OK so what is the level of responsibility ?

Suff, so what is one room ??? Our lounge has a large arch (think 7+ feet) to sunroom. I don't want to be dictated too.... by planning offices.
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby Ratatouille » March 2nd, 2019, 7:46 pm

Mr R's mum could trip over her own shadow and did frquently. Any difference in levels in a room where she was could have been fatal for her.

None of us gets younger and as sight and mobility go then it is sensible to avoid such hazards. we have numerous changes of level in this house but they are quite marked so we know about them and can compensate. Slight changes are more problematic
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby earthmaiden » March 2nd, 2019, 8:22 pm

I think different levels can look nice but already people here have mentioned the problems it can cause with poor sight and mobility which can affect oneself or family members as years go by (needing to use a walker is a big one). Just out of interest, do new builds have to have doors and passages which can accommodate wheelchairs? I am not sure.
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby StokeySue » March 2nd, 2019, 9:27 pm

I think it depends on the building, certainly shops, pubs and restaurants have to have step free access and provide disabled, wheel chair accessible toilets where possible. Existing buildings may be exempted where adaptation isn’t possible

The trouble is that there still aren’t enough wheelchair accessible spaces but if you ask people what they will do to make a building disability friendly all they ever mention is wheel chair access. Most disabled people aren’t in wheelchairs. Probably the cheapest and easiest thing to do is to put in better signage. Helps the visually impaired, the hearing impaired and in fact nearly everyone in a bit of a hurry too.

I did moan to the NatWest that there “accessible” ATMs don’t have backlit key pads.Lack of joined up thinking.
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby Zosherooney » March 3rd, 2019, 6:07 am

Sue, maybe they are trying to keep your pin number 'safe' and not advertise it to someone who might be watching....
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby Oat » March 3rd, 2019, 7:38 am

We moved into a new build last May, it has wheelchair access. We went away in August and came home to find the front door step missing :lol: It was a step about 3 inches high but was not compatible for a wheelchair so not part of the plans so the builders had removed them. The back has patio doors with a step of about 6 inches, so i suppose if or when we need it we can put in a step or ramp. The internal doors are wider, as is the stair case.
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby suffolk » March 3rd, 2019, 7:59 am

Zosherooney wrote:We all need to take some degree of responsibility for ourselves.....OK so what is the level of responsibility ?

Suff, so what is one room ??? Our lounge has a large arch (think 7+ feet) to sunroom. I don't want to be dictated too.... by planning offices.


I think it’s a matter of common sense ... why set traps for yourself if you have the option not to? The phrase ‘cutting off one’s nose to spite one’s face’ comes to mind ;) We kept telling Ma that the change of level in the garden room was dangerous but she wouldn’t believe us (she always knew best :rolleyes: ).

It’d be a shame if you had to clutter your lovely open space with ramps and handrails in a few years’ time. To my mind future-proofing your home so you can live there as long as possible is the responsible thing to do. If Pa hadn’t broken his hip he and Ma could’ve had another seven years in their own home.

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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby PatsyMFagan » March 3rd, 2019, 9:31 am

When I was in Canada last year, I asked, at a roadside café for a pot of English tea …. along came the pot, and a mug and cold milk. After about 3 minutes, I lifted the lid of the tea-pot to stir the brew, to find only water in it … the tea bag had been placed out of my sight on the other side of the pot. I went up the server and asked for her to put my tea bag in the pot before adding the hot(ish) water … she said she couldn't ; because of H&S rules …. by handling the tea bag, she could pass any germs on to me :(
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby earthmaiden » March 3rd, 2019, 10:52 am

Haven't they heard of tongs? :lol:
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby StokeySue » March 3rd, 2019, 11:05 am

Zosherooney wrote:Sue, maybe they are trying to keep your pin number 'safe' and not advertise it to someone who might be watching....

No, they are just too stupid to think of it, the reaction made that clear

how can providing an “accessible” ATM that I can’t use without difficulty and will probably have several attempts to use improve either my access to their services or my security? Of course it doesn’t. I am talking of the indoor machines, not those on the street

Though I notice that other banks and building societies have started using some nice low vision friendly ATMs, saw them first at the Halifax, properly backlit but with a different layout that makes it hard to read over someone’s shoulder.

suffolk wrote:I think it’s a matter of common sense ... why set traps for yourself if you have the option not to? The phrase ‘cutting off one’s nose to spite one’s face’ comes to mind

Yes, I would only put in steps where necessary, for example where connecting to an existing building or on a slope. Apart from anything else, it restricts who will buy the property if you sell on
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby WWordsworth » March 3rd, 2019, 11:12 am

I understand what folks are saying about future proofing the house.
However if Zosh wants a particular feature in her house and it does not contravene any regulations shouldn't she be able to do it?
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby StokeySue » March 3rd, 2019, 11:25 am

I thought the suggestion was that Zosh’s level changes would fall foul of local planning guidelines if not national building regulations?
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby suffolk » March 3rd, 2019, 11:29 am

Of course she should .. within legal parameters ... but surely the benefit of talking about it with a few friends is that you get the benefit of other people’s experiences as well as your own ... and to be honest I really wouldn’t blame a builder for refusing to do work that he considers unsafe ... regulations or not ... in the world as it is at the moment he has to protect himself from the possibility of legal claims in the future ... even back in the 70s and 80s when I was married to a builder his liability insurers made him very aware of his responsibilities in that regard.
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby WWordsworth » March 3rd, 2019, 11:29 am

Yes, it does but several Wildies seem to think it's not the best idea anyway.
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby Zosherooney » March 3rd, 2019, 6:13 pm

Bubble wrap Britain. I am not a child and I think my modest ideas should not be cut short by what I (or anyone else) might need when older..... I already have to have waist height light switches :rolleyes: Yes,change things for the older generation be for goodness sake, let me have what looks good for us now !!!! Or we will all be living in care homes for all our lives !!!!

Now off to the 'village' cinema to see Swimming with Men !!!!!
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby suffolk » March 3rd, 2019, 6:18 pm

That’s my point ... Pa only needed to go to a care home because he broke his hip slipping on the change of level and didn’t recover well ... but it’s up to you of course .., as long as your builder is happy to do it and if complies with building regs etc. :D
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby Badger's mate » March 4th, 2019, 9:37 am

Last month I went to a talk by a manager of an allotment garden in a London park. The garden is run on organic principles, they don't use slug pellets. For the purposes of mollusc control they put out beer traps. As children visit the gardens it is not permitted to use normal beer but have to use alcohol-free beer in the traps. Presumably it's OK for the children to swallow a load of beer and slugs, as long as it's not alcoholic...

I have not taken the trouble to check the veracity of the story, it's what we were told. For example, there might be a general ban on alcohol in the park for other reasons of course. Much of the apparent nonsense (as Herbi and others have said) comes because someone is unwilling to do something and blames it on 'regulations'. We love it of course, it gives us a good moan. In the workplace, people who might once have been shop stewards seem to get QUENSH roles, their character often determines the atmosphere around those issues, just as it did in different ways in the past.

Over many years at work I had often been told something or another had to be done for H&S, or European Law. My usual reaction was to ask them to show me, most couldn't because they'd made the story up. Once the internet became available it was possible to check things much more easily, often people get wound up because they simply believe what they've been told rather than check it with the authority concerned. This sort of thing can have all sorts of consequences, as our politicians are currently discovering :rolleyes:
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby suffolk » March 4th, 2019, 10:05 am

EU law was blamed for loads of stuff it had nothing to do with because of laziness by officials and the mendaciousness of politicians who didn’t want to take responsibility for the consequences of their own policies ... ‘wasn’t me Miss ... it was the big boys over there ... I couldn’t do a thing about it’ ... hence the current ridiculous situation we’re stuck in :twisted:
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby Meganthemog » March 4th, 2019, 10:11 am

We were more at risk using the glowing hot tongs to serve ourselves, using the commercial toaster with no instructions plus the urn for tea that had a big notice beside it indicating that it may contain hot water. :scared: :lol: :lol: :lol:

We were staying in a hotel some time ago when a young lad started fishing about in the toaster with a pair of metal tongs :terrified: :terrified: his grandparents were standing next to him totally unaware of the danger.
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby Ratatouille » March 4th, 2019, 10:11 am

:tu: :tu: :tu: :tu: :tu: :tu: Suffs. Straight bananas anyone?
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby Badger's mate » March 4th, 2019, 11:44 am

because of laziness by officials and the mendaciousness of politicians


True, but it's also fertile ground for journalists.
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby jrc » March 4th, 2019, 11:52 am

All I asked for was could the bloke to put a fried egg on my plate?? :lol: :lol: :lol: ?
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby Grasshopper » March 4th, 2019, 8:12 pm

I was browsing in a charity shop the other day, as one does, and wanted to have a look at a game from the top shelf. They had a kick-stool, but despite me saying that I worked in a library and used kick-stools a lot, I Was Not Allowed to use theirs. :rolleyes: It wouldn't have taken me a minute to hop up, grab what i wanted, and hop back down.

But I Wasn't Allowed.

I find that in other places too.

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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby earthmaiden » March 4th, 2019, 8:52 pm

Grassy, we had all our kick stools and small stepladders removed. At the same time we had a long demo explaining that only steps or ladders which had a side hand rail would be allowed in future. That was about 10 years ago and to this day I have not seen a replacement ladder. I am not tall enough to properly see a lot of the maps and plans hanging on the wall any more:rolleyes: .

Am I alone in clambering up supermarket shelves when the last of something is high up at the back? There is never anyone around to ask and no steps to climb on (for reasons already mentioned no doubt). You'd think the slight of a large mature woman doing acrobats on the shelves or fridges would bring H&S people out of the woodwork - but it doesn't.
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby northleedsbhoy » March 5th, 2019, 9:14 am

I posted this a few years back when something else came up about H&S and how ridiculous some employers were when it came to interpretation of the rules.

http://www.hse.gov.uk/myth/mythofthemonth.htm

Cheers
NLB :tu:
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby Ratatouille » March 5th, 2019, 9:23 am

[quote="earthmaiden"]
Am I alone in clambering up supermarket shelves when the last of something is high up at the back? There is never anyone around to ask and no steps to climb on (for reasons already mentioned no doubt). You'd think the slight of a large mature woman doing acrobats on the shelves or fridges would bring H&S people out of the woodwork - but it doesn't.[/quote

The shelf stackers in the newly altered chiiler section at Leclerc always used to climb up the shelves and I was horrified not just about theit safety but about the foos hygiene aspect

NLB I see our family was banned in 2010 :lol: :lol: :lol:
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby northleedsbhoy » March 5th, 2019, 9:39 am

NLB I see our family was banned in 2010 :lol: :lol: :lol:

:lol: :lol: :lol: :tu:

Cheers
NLB :tu:
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Re: Who knew ‘Splashback’ was so dangerous?

Postby earthmaiden » March 5th, 2019, 12:37 pm

When I worked nights in Asda circa 1990, climbing the shelves was the least of our worries. It was commonplace (especially for the boys) to hurl whole cases of goods from one aisle to another over the top of the shelves, race trollies up and down and all sorts of other things - and we all carried knives which we would probably be arrested for these days. Luckily, no-one ever came to any harm! We used to play our own music over the shop loudspeaker very, very loudly too which probably wasn't good for our ears - happy days! ;)
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