My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Order yourself a latte, and a pastry (The virtual cinnamon buns are excellent today). And have a nice chat.

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby suffolk » July 1st, 2019, 10:08 am

Enervated is one of my favourite words :D

Do you think that folk may feel that quantum physics is actively taking steps to bamboozle them personally? ... I wouldn’t put that past it :lol:
“I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” —Winnie-the-Pooh
User avatar
suffolk
Registered
 
Posts: 39635
Joined: August 11th, 2010, 6:47 am
Location: East Anglia, surprisingly!

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby Herbidacious » July 1st, 2019, 11:45 am

That was just an example ;) Actually the person who uses this a lot at work is probably not bamboozled by quantum physics in any sense :)

Who was the politician who famously misued the word enervated, using it to mean energized?
User avatar
Herbidacious
Registered
 
Posts: 6402
Joined: August 11th, 2012, 2:48 pm
Location: South East London, and occasionally Normandy

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby StokeySue » July 1st, 2019, 2:12 pm

The one that keeps cropping up in that vein is "disinterested" (meaning without bias) where the speaker, or more usually writer, means uninterested (not engaged)

Pretty different, but really common, it's almost as if un- has ceased to exist, I was quite shocked when someone in G2 used dis- rather than un- recently, neither they nor an editor had noticed it sounded wrong
Sue
User avatar
StokeySue
Registered
 
Posts: 21202
Joined: April 21st, 2010, 5:18 pm
Location: Stoke Newington (London)

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby suffolk » July 1st, 2019, 2:56 pm

Only when written of course, but the use of discrete for discreet ... and vice versa :rolleyes:
“I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” —Winnie-the-Pooh
User avatar
suffolk
Registered
 
Posts: 39635
Joined: August 11th, 2010, 6:47 am
Location: East Anglia, surprisingly!

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby Seatallan » July 1st, 2019, 4:45 pm

I can't be doing with people (especially educated people) who write letters/emails/reports with no paragraph breaks or decent punctuation. It used to irritate the pants off me when I was still working and such things came from professionals (consultants, social workers, etc) who had no excuse whatsoever in my book.
Food, Felines and Fells (in no particular order)
User avatar
Seatallan
Registered
 
Posts: 9739
Joined: April 1st, 2010, 3:28 pm
Location: Reading

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby earthmaiden » July 1st, 2019, 4:52 pm

This isn't really a hate but doesn't merit a new thread either.

When I was a child, the quite well-to- do family of a girl I used to go to play with pronounced Marmite 'mar-meet'. My mother explained that Marmite was named after the French style dish pictured on the label which was known as a mar-meet so our friends were theoretically correct.
I have never heard the dish turn up in conversation or heard anyone else use that pronunciation for Marmite. If you go online, all the pronunciations given are 'mar-mite', even in relation to the dish.
My French is poor, what is the correct pronunciation for the dish? Have you heard anyone else pronounce the product as 'mar-meet'?
User avatar
earthmaiden
Registered
 
Posts: 11774
Joined: April 2nd, 2010, 8:36 pm
Location: Wiltshire. UK

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby earthmaiden » July 1st, 2019, 4:56 pm

I have just thought of another one. The use of 'pointy' instead of 'pointed'.
User avatar
earthmaiden
Registered
 
Posts: 11774
Joined: April 2nd, 2010, 8:36 pm
Location: Wiltshire. UK

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby StokeySue » July 1st, 2019, 5:09 pm

Definitely "mar-meet" in French earthmaiden! Here's an audio file
https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/french-english/marmite

Also made me lookup "marmiton" - as I use the French recipe collection site of that name sometimes, It's a kitchen hand
Sue
User avatar
StokeySue
Registered
 
Posts: 21202
Joined: April 21st, 2010, 5:18 pm
Location: Stoke Newington (London)

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby Pepper Pig » July 1st, 2019, 5:46 pm

Seatallan wrote:I can't be doing with people (especially educated people) who write letters/emails/reports with no paragraph breaks or decent punctuation. It used to irritate the pants off me when I was still working and such things came from professionals (consultants, social workers, etc) who had no excuse whatsoever in my book.


Am completely with you there. When I was managing teachers I was frequently appalled that some of them couldn’t write basic English.
User avatar
Pepper Pig
Registered
 
Posts: 6155
Joined: June 9th, 2014, 7:18 pm
Location: Harrow-on-the-Hill

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby earthmaiden » July 1st, 2019, 5:48 pm

Thanks Sue! Didn't find that one :).
User avatar
earthmaiden
Registered
 
Posts: 11774
Joined: April 2nd, 2010, 8:36 pm
Location: Wiltshire. UK

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby Herbidacious » July 1st, 2019, 7:53 pm

Pointy has comedic value? Buffy (the Vampire Slayer) had a stake which she called Mr Pointy :)

I overheard a managing editor at work using the word 'wibbly' with reference to a line, the other day. I think she meant wiggly?
There is wibbly-wobbly, but is wibbly on it's own a real word?

I am not keen on the use of 'impact' as a verb. X impacts y, as opposed to 'has an impact on'. More business speak I think.
User avatar
Herbidacious
Registered
 
Posts: 6402
Joined: August 11th, 2012, 2:48 pm
Location: South East London, and occasionally Normandy

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby suffolk » July 1st, 2019, 9:24 pm

I think ‘wibble’ and its derivatives are part of Rowan Atkinson’s repertoire ... in Blackaddef possibly?
“I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” —Winnie-the-Pooh
User avatar
suffolk
Registered
 
Posts: 39635
Joined: August 11th, 2010, 6:47 am
Location: East Anglia, surprisingly!

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby earthmaiden » July 1st, 2019, 9:37 pm

Hmmm, it appears that both wibbly and pointy are now part of our formal language!

I agree that pointy started off as comedic but people seem to use it quite seriously now, I hear it quite a lot. :evil:.
User avatar
earthmaiden
Registered
 
Posts: 11774
Joined: April 2nd, 2010, 8:36 pm
Location: Wiltshire. UK

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby StokeySue » July 1st, 2019, 9:37 pm

They are apparently making Blackadder 5 - this time he’s a university lecturer

Shades of the History Man?
Sue
User avatar
StokeySue
Registered
 
Posts: 21202
Joined: April 21st, 2010, 5:18 pm
Location: Stoke Newington (London)

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby Herbidacious » July 2nd, 2019, 7:41 am

suffolk wrote:I think ‘wibble’ and its derivatives are part of Rowan Atkinson’s repertoire ... in Blackaddef possibly?


Or Doctor Who. He describes something as a wibbly wobbly timey wimy thingy... or some such
User avatar
Herbidacious
Registered
 
Posts: 6402
Joined: August 11th, 2012, 2:48 pm
Location: South East London, and occasionally Normandy

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby Herbidacious » July 2nd, 2019, 7:43 am

Hard to believe that the first one aired in about 1983. I was 15!
User avatar
Herbidacious
Registered
 
Posts: 6402
Joined: August 11th, 2012, 2:48 pm
Location: South East London, and occasionally Normandy

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby TeresaFoodie » July 2nd, 2019, 7:47 am

Favourite word for me - illustrious.

I hate, hate, HATE it when I hear 'It is what it is'. Sooo lazy.
Imagine peace
User avatar
TeresaFoodie
Registered
 
Posts: 4395
Joined: May 7th, 2017, 11:00 am
Location: Dunstabubble, UK

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby Herbidacious » July 2nd, 2019, 9:54 am

I like illustrious.

I had thought of "It is what it is" as meaning something like 'there is no more to it, nothing else to be read into it, there is no escaping it's truth (or the situation it describes) and (possibly) it cannot be otherwise... so one has to accept it.' rather than a simple tautology. Perhaps I read to much into it?! (Ironically.) Is 'it is what it is' just what it is, or something more?!
Last edited by Herbidacious on July 2nd, 2019, 11:54 am, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
Herbidacious
Registered
 
Posts: 6402
Joined: August 11th, 2012, 2:48 pm
Location: South East London, and occasionally Normandy

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby suffolk » July 2nd, 2019, 11:28 am

Herbi ... thats how I understood that phrase.
“I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” —Winnie-the-Pooh
User avatar
suffolk
Registered
 
Posts: 39635
Joined: August 11th, 2010, 6:47 am
Location: East Anglia, surprisingly!

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby Seatallan » July 2nd, 2019, 11:36 am

TeresaFoodie wrote:I hate, hate, HATE it when I hear 'It is what it is'. Sooo lazy.


I don't mind that expression but I can't be doing with 'this moment in time'.

Favorite word is 'vestibule' :D
Food, Felines and Fells (in no particular order)
User avatar
Seatallan
Registered
 
Posts: 9739
Joined: April 1st, 2010, 3:28 pm
Location: Reading

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby aero280 » July 2nd, 2019, 3:14 pm

I like “yclept”. :)
http://www.saabtechtalk.com/
User avatar
aero280
Site Admin
 
Posts: 7403
Joined: December 31st, 2009, 12:46 pm
Location: Hertfordshire, UK

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby earthmaiden » July 2nd, 2019, 3:26 pm

[quote} I had thought of "It is what it is" as meaning something like 'there is no more to it, nothing else to be read into it, there is no escaping it's truth (or the situation it describes) and (possibly) it cannot be otherwise... so one has to accept it.' rather than a simple tautology. Perhaps I read to much into it?! [/quote]

That's what I thought too. MIL used to say 'san fairy ann' with a similar meaning (which I found a bit irritating). I have just looked it up and it says ...." A deliberate jokey corruption of the French phrase 'Ça ne fait rien' - it doesn't matter". I don't think she said it as a joke, I believe it may have been corrupted and used widely when she was younger. I expect that annoyed a lot of people too :lol: .
User avatar
earthmaiden
Registered
 
Posts: 11774
Joined: April 2nd, 2010, 8:36 pm
Location: Wiltshire. UK

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby Gruney » July 2nd, 2019, 6:59 pm

My favourite word is "loathsome".
Gruney
Registered
 
Posts: 2410
Joined: April 1st, 2010, 6:45 am

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby Ratatouille » July 2nd, 2019, 7:23 pm

My favourite English word is serendipity.

As for pointy. In Monty python and the Holy Grail the magician meets the killer bunny - a rabbit with "Great bi pointy teeth1"
Cooking for those you care about is the most profound expression of love - Anne-Sophie Pic
Ratatouille
Registered
 
Posts: 8848
Joined: August 23rd, 2013, 11:48 am

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby Catherine » July 5th, 2019, 1:46 pm

My favourite word - Dongle. Whoever thought that up is a bloody genius.
Catherine
Registered
 
Posts: 4705
Joined: December 31st, 2009, 9:45 pm
Location: Surrey

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby Ratatouille » July 5th, 2019, 1:54 pm

Widget is quite good too.
Cooking for those you care about is the most profound expression of love - Anne-Sophie Pic
Ratatouille
Registered
 
Posts: 8848
Joined: August 23rd, 2013, 11:48 am

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby cyprusmoira » July 5th, 2019, 2:00 pm

I hate two times when they, usually an advertiser means twice, it is only one word too
When life gives you lemons, make sorbet
cyprusmoira
Registered
 
Posts: 11797
Joined: January 1st, 2010, 7:34 am
Location: Souni, Cyprus

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby aero280 » July 5th, 2019, 4:16 pm

"Train station" grates with me. Is that an American one that's been adopted by the BBC.

What was wrong with "Railway Station"?
http://www.saabtechtalk.com/
User avatar
aero280
Site Admin
 
Posts: 7403
Joined: December 31st, 2009, 12:46 pm
Location: Hertfordshire, UK

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby earthmaiden » July 5th, 2019, 5:10 pm

aero - that's one of my pet hates too!
User avatar
earthmaiden
Registered
 
Posts: 11774
Joined: April 2nd, 2010, 8:36 pm
Location: Wiltshire. UK

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby Ratatouille » July 5th, 2019, 6:20 pm

WE both shout at whoever says that!
Cooking for those you care about is the most profound expression of love - Anne-Sophie Pic
Ratatouille
Registered
 
Posts: 8848
Joined: August 23rd, 2013, 11:48 am

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby Gruney » July 5th, 2019, 6:38 pm

DrawRing and withdrawRal.
Gruney
Registered
 
Posts: 2410
Joined: April 1st, 2010, 6:45 am

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby suffolk » July 5th, 2019, 8:02 pm

Gruney wrote:DrawRing and withdrawRal.


Grrrr!
“I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” —Winnie-the-Pooh
User avatar
suffolk
Registered
 
Posts: 39635
Joined: August 11th, 2010, 6:47 am
Location: East Anglia, surprisingly!

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby OneMoreCheekyOne » July 5th, 2019, 9:10 pm

Oh dear, I always say train station :shock: :D
OneMoreCheekyOne
Registered
 
Posts: 2209
Joined: April 17th, 2012, 9:41 am
Location: Cheshire

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby Rainbow » July 5th, 2019, 10:25 pm

OneMoreCheekyOne wrote:Oh dear, I always say train station :shock: :D

So do I!
i hadn't thought about it before, but I don't think anyone says 'railway station' over here - must be very British ;)
User avatar
Rainbow
Registered
 
Posts: 1204
Joined: November 14th, 2012, 7:04 am
Location: Australia

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby scullion » July 6th, 2019, 1:59 am

i quite like susurration - an onomatopœic word (i quite like that one as well).

i don't like the appellation 'mum' - it takes away the identity of the mother and is annoying when a child shouts 'mum' and every mother in the room turns round to see if it's theirs. what's wrong with the person's name or a personalised nickname rather than the same as everyone else's (ditto for dad - i could never bring myself to call my partner's father 'dad' even though that's how he signed cards to me - i and my children always called him by the word his initials made).
i once heard a very small child, who was walking with a man who was obviously her grandfather, call him 'woodworm' - i thought that was inspired.

as to the coffee sizes - the woman who served my friend and me at starbucks, the other day, called the coffee large instead of venti - how sensible.
User avatar
scullion
Registered
 
Posts: 13180
Joined: April 9th, 2010, 2:08 pm
Location: cornwall

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby Herbidacious » July 6th, 2019, 7:56 am

OneMoreCheekyOne wrote:Oh dear, I always say train station :shock: :D
. Me too :)
User avatar
Herbidacious
Registered
 
Posts: 6402
Joined: August 11th, 2012, 2:48 pm
Location: South East London, and occasionally Normandy

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby scullion » July 6th, 2019, 8:01 am

we just say station, only differentiating if it's another type - bus, polling etc
User avatar
scullion
Registered
 
Posts: 13180
Joined: April 9th, 2010, 2:08 pm
Location: cornwall

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby earthmaiden » July 6th, 2019, 9:29 am

I think it's an age thing. I have noticed that younger people (under 50's :lol: ) say train station more readily. I noticed the change on the news etc at around the time the railways in the UK were privatised and wondered if it was on purpose (due to one company looking after trains and station and the other the railway tracks).
User avatar
earthmaiden
Registered
 
Posts: 11774
Joined: April 2nd, 2010, 8:36 pm
Location: Wiltshire. UK

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby StokeySue » July 6th, 2019, 9:52 am

scullion wrote:we just say station, only differentiating if it's another type - bus, polling etc

Me too

I think you can argue the Mum one the other way - it has an equivalent in all or nearly all languages and cultures, it seems most people like their children to distinguish them by using the title rather than the name everyone else uses, even if most members of the culture use the same title.

In my family I used Mum and Dad to address my parents, I called one set of grandparents granny and grandpa and the other nan and grandad. Nan for a grandmother I know is a pet hate for many people and my mother would not have been keen, but Nan was my father’s stepmother and he wasn’t keen on the idea of me calling her granny or grandma which should have been his late mother and she wasn’t keen on me calling her Ginny which was her name. So she suggested Nan herself as a diplomatic compromise.
Sue
User avatar
StokeySue
Registered
 
Posts: 21202
Joined: April 21st, 2010, 5:18 pm
Location: Stoke Newington (London)

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby earthmaiden » July 6th, 2019, 12:22 pm

I wasn't allowed to use mum or dad - it was considered common. It had to be mummy etc. I always used mum/dad when talking about them outside the family though! My maternal grandmother was called just by her first name. I absolutely refused to call MIL 'mum' - it caused quite an upset!
User avatar
earthmaiden
Registered
 
Posts: 11774
Joined: April 2nd, 2010, 8:36 pm
Location: Wiltshire. UK

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby Gruney » July 6th, 2019, 12:48 pm

I always thought "mum" stemmed from it sounding very much like the first attept at speech made by a baby.
Gruney
Registered
 
Posts: 2410
Joined: April 1st, 2010, 6:45 am

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby StokeySue » July 6th, 2019, 12:49 pm

It surprised someone recently that I file all documents, and things like photos too, relating to my parents and the French relatives using actual names, so my father is filed under Fred. My OH and I started doing this as titles and descriptions of relationships kept getting muddled between the two languages.
Sue
User avatar
StokeySue
Registered
 
Posts: 21202
Joined: April 21st, 2010, 5:18 pm
Location: Stoke Newington (London)

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby Ratatouille » July 6th, 2019, 2:11 pm

When our two were little they heard us calling Mr R's mother Mum so that's what they called her.His father asked to be called grandpa but DD couldn't manage that so he became Pa I was mummy my mum was granny. When the kids got older and Pa died Mum decided she wan't another title and asked them what it should be they decided . along with DD that Grandmas Bunting sounded too formal but that's what she was so they shortend it to GB and that is what she remained except GD wasn't very good as saying Bs so she always called her GDs.

When I was a child it was usual to refer to one's grandparents as Grandma/pa - or Grandmother/father followed by their surname. Being the youngest gradchild though I got away with granny and grandie

I hate nanny and nanna - very common in the NE. Makes it sound as if they have a female goat for a grandparent
Cooking for those you care about is the most profound expression of love - Anne-Sophie Pic
Ratatouille
Registered
 
Posts: 8848
Joined: August 23rd, 2013, 11:48 am

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby Herbidacious » July 6th, 2019, 5:26 pm

Oh another Americanism that’s creeping in: addicting used in place of addictive. There may be a subtle difference, but I am pretty sure that, if so, most of those who use it do not know what it is.
User avatar
Herbidacious
Registered
 
Posts: 6402
Joined: August 11th, 2012, 2:48 pm
Location: South East London, and occasionally Normandy

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby Catherine » July 6th, 2019, 6:49 pm

Ratatouille wrote:
I hate nanny and nanna - very common in the NE. Makes it sound as if they have a female goat for a grandparent


Both my Grandmothers were Nanna. I loved calling them that
Catherine
Registered
 
Posts: 4705
Joined: December 31st, 2009, 9:45 pm
Location: Surrey

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby patpoyntz » July 6th, 2019, 8:00 pm

Ratatouille wrote:
I hate nanny and nanna - very common in the NE. Makes it sound as if they have a female goat for a grandparent


Or Nana the dog/nanny in Peter Pan?
That’s who I thought of when I had a Nana, she lived with us and looked after us a lot....I loved calling her Nana, and Nan, when I got older because that was her name.
Now we are AP and UP to our nieces and nephews..Aunt Pat & Uncle Peter, and GAP and GUP to their children!
patpoyntz
Registered
 
Posts: 739
Joined: February 9th, 2014, 5:26 pm

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby karadekoolaid » July 7th, 2019, 1:37 am

A bit late to the "enervating" post. Lacking vigour, I might imagine. :lol: :lol:
It was one of my favourites when teaching post-grad students. The absolute opposite of " innervating".

I think my current favourite word is "curmudgeonly". There´s an old boy lives next door (94 yrs old) who fits the bill! :lol: :lol:
" Bite off more than you can chew, then chew like Hell!"
User avatar
karadekoolaid
Registered
 
Posts: 4924
Joined: March 31st, 2010, 12:17 am
Location: Caracas, Venezuela

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby Herbidacious » July 7th, 2019, 7:12 pm

My mother was very snooty about nan, granny and nana, or nannahhh as it was pronounced in Sheffield. Don’t know why. She never knew any of her grandparents. My one living grandparent was Grandma.
I like Nan.
User avatar
Herbidacious
Registered
 
Posts: 6402
Joined: August 11th, 2012, 2:48 pm
Location: South East London, and occasionally Normandy

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby StokeySue » July 7th, 2019, 9:35 pm

My mother would have been snooty about Nan or Nana- if my Nan (Jinny) hadn’t suggested it as a bit of family diplomacy, but nobody ever seems to grasp how smart she was being, I simply couldn’t have called her granny or grandma

My French OH called his grandmère Granny, she decided she liked the sound of it although she didn’t speak English. She also called her oldest daughter Daisy, too early to be from the Great Gatsby so probably she either heard the song Daisy Daisy during WW1 or she was named after King Edward’s Darling Daisy
Sue
User avatar
StokeySue
Registered
 
Posts: 21202
Joined: April 21st, 2010, 5:18 pm
Location: Stoke Newington (London)

Re: My pet hate 'word' - LIKE

Postby Rainbow » July 7th, 2019, 10:44 pm

My parents disliked Mum and Dad (not sure why) so It was mummy and daddy and then their names when I was older.

My mother's mother was granny or occasionally babushka (she was Russian) but my father's mother refused to be granny/grandma because it made her feel old!! She was only a bit over 40 so I can understand!! Instead we just called her Barbara (her choice) and called her mother nanny (my great grandmother).
Granny and Nanny were about the same age, but a generation apart!!
User avatar
Rainbow
Registered
 
Posts: 1204
Joined: November 14th, 2012, 7:04 am
Location: Australia

PreviousNext

Return to The Coffee Shop

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests