Things you rarely see these days.

Order yourself a latte, and a pastry (The virtual cinnamon buns are excellent today). And have a nice chat.

Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby suffolk » January 23rd, 2020, 7:26 pm

There’s a large petrol station at the Thickthorn roundabout where the A11 and the A47 meet ... quite often a chap who works there comes out and insists on filling my car with fuel while I go inside to wait in the warm and then pay.

It makes up for the time when I was 17 and worked in the office at a village garage and one of my duties was to be “pump dolly” :lol: no matter what the weather :rolleyes:
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby Pepper Pig » January 23rd, 2020, 7:32 pm

Thanks BB.
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby Rainbow » January 23rd, 2020, 10:55 pm

PatsyMFagan wrote:I found a lot of it took up too much room, like the lettuce saver (fridge)

We still have a lettuce saver - 2 of them in fact!! Different sizes and we use them a lot, especially when it's really hot, as it is now, and we live on salads!!
We also have some long rectangular vegetable containers which we use all the time, although the lids are a bit broken on some of them now.
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby Seatallan » January 24th, 2020, 10:23 am

Can you still get lettuce/salad spinners for washing your salad leaves? My mum had one (she did love a gadget did my mum).

Re petrol stations- Mr S was a petrol pump attendant in Skipton for a while, between school and university. He really enjoyed it. Another friend of mine also worked at a petrol station and was responsible for closing it down late in the evening. He always sang 'My Way' over the tannoy system as he was doing so. Probably drove the neighbours bonkers. :lol:
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby StokeySue » January 24th, 2020, 10:49 am

I would have though salad spinners still mainstream equipment, mine is at least 25 years old and used on average twice a week, but they are available all over the place. How else do you dry salad without taking it outside and shaking it?

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Ikea-TOKIG-Salad-Spinner-White/dp/B00SRIICH0/ref=asc_df_B00SRIICH0/?tag=googshopuk-21&linkCode=df0&hvadid=309905789416&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=7992525895435181014&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9046004&hvtargid=pla-597951176128&psc=1
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby Pepper Pig » January 24th, 2020, 10:51 am

My mother used to wrap lettuce leaves up in a tea towel and spin it round over her head. She might still do so.
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby StokeySue » January 24th, 2020, 11:40 am

Pepper Pig wrote:My mother used to wrap lettuce leaves up in a tea towel and spin it round over her head. She might still do so.

So did mine, then she got a French salad basket to use in the same way. Which is not such a good idea if you live in a flat, or if it is pouring with rain, as it's best used outside :D
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby suffolk » January 24th, 2020, 2:37 pm

Pepper Pig wrote:My mother used to wrap lettuce leaves up in a tea towel and spin it round over her head. She might still do so.


Still my preferred way of drying washed salad leaves :D ... we have a Lakeland salad spinner, medium size, but it makes more washing up. A tea towel just goes in the wash.
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby PatsyMFagan » January 24th, 2020, 7:07 pm

Pepper Pig wrote:My mother used to wrap lettuce leaves up in a tea towel and spin it round over her head. She might still do so.


I do that 8-)
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby dennispc » January 24th, 2020, 8:36 pm

Took our salad spinner to a Charity shop last week.
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby Rainbow » January 24th, 2020, 10:09 pm

StokeySue wrote:
Pepper Pig wrote:My mother used to wrap lettuce leaves up in a tea towel and spin it round over her head. She might still do so.

So did mine, then she got a French salad basket to use in the same way. Which is not such a good idea if you live in a flat, or if it is pouring with rain, as it's best used outside :D

:lol:
We have an Ikea salad spinner - quite small and compact and we use it most days. We just rinse it out and leave it to drain - it doesn't really get very dirty with washed lettuce leaves in it :D
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby Seatallan » January 26th, 2020, 2:30 pm

StokeySue wrote: How else do you dry salad without taking it outside and shaking it?


I just rinse it through a sieve..... :)
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby Pepper Pig » January 31st, 2020, 7:45 pm

Just watching the Antiques Road Trip. Who remembers Subbuteo? And why on earth was it ever a thing? :lol: :lol: :lol:
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby earthmaiden » January 31st, 2020, 7:50 pm

I didn't know it stopped being a thing, I thought I had just managed to avoid it for the past 30 years :lol:.
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby Pepper Pig » January 31st, 2020, 7:56 pm

I can’t remember my boys playing it and they’re both games lads, 38 and 28 respectively. But I am old and my memory is terrible,
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby earthmaiden » January 31st, 2020, 8:22 pm

Ex OH bought it sometime between 1974 and 1984. We all played it for a while but apart from him, none of us liked football much and I seem to remember that the base cloth rucked up a lot giving unfair advantages to some.I have just looked it up and apparently it is supposed to be played on a table. We always played on the carpet :?
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby wargarden » February 1st, 2020, 3:53 pm

not for cooking but found lava lamp in closet last week
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby StokeySue » February 1st, 2020, 4:00 pm

wargarden wrote:not for cooking but found lava lamp in closet last week

:lol:
Those had a bit of a revival over here, but I think the fashion may have passed again

Even more cluttering up closets
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby miss mouse » February 1st, 2020, 4:04 pm

Pepper Pig wrote: Who remembers Subbuteo? And why on earth was it ever a thing?


Son and his fond papa and some visiting kids liked it. I have no idea why, picking up the wretched pieces drove me scatty. I can't even remember the rules, well probably never knew them TBH.
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby StokeySue » February 1st, 2020, 4:15 pm

The most interesting thing about Subbuteo is the name

Wikipedia says
The "Subbuteo" name derives from the neo-Latin scientific name Falco subbuteo (a bird of prey commonly known as the Eurasian hobby), after a trademark was not granted to its creator Peter Adolph (1916–1994) to call the game "Hobby".
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby slimpersoninside » February 1st, 2020, 4:38 pm

We have a Subbuteo set under our bed!
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby earthmaiden » February 1st, 2020, 4:52 pm

StokeySue wrote:The most interesting thing about Subbuteo is the name ....

Who'd have guessed!
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby Pepper Pig » February 1st, 2020, 4:56 pm

slimpersoninside wrote:We have a Subbuteo set under our bed!
I’m trying to remember how much last night’s lot fetched! There is a good market for it apparently.
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby miss mouse » February 1st, 2020, 10:29 pm

Pepper Pig wrote: There is a good market for it apparently.


I think ours went into the bin or was given away, another family fortune lost. There were particular characters/ footie players which just had to be had. Weren't the 'players' flicked to move the ball, the 'players' had semi-circle weighted bases as I recall. I hate games. Sorry.
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby scullion » February 2nd, 2020, 11:45 am

i have a lava lamp. i wasn't allowed one first time round - the excuse was that it was for the kids. i put it on occasionally.
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby Seatallan » February 2nd, 2020, 1:20 pm

I've always wanted one! :D
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby Gruney » February 2nd, 2020, 5:46 pm

I've got a Galileo thermometer on my mantlepiece.
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby Pepper Pig » February 2nd, 2020, 6:07 pm

No idea what that is Gruney.

Does anyone still have a Ewbank carpet sweeper?
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby Suelle » February 2nd, 2020, 6:28 pm

Gruney wrote:I've got a Galileo thermometer on my mantlepiece.


Me too!
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby earthmaiden » February 2nd, 2020, 6:31 pm

I've got a carpet sweeper (don't think its a Ewbank). I haven't used it since I had the cordless vacuum though. I found some of DDs old dolls house furniture which included a carpet sweeper. Had to spend some time explaining it to GD :rolleyes:.
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby aero280 » February 2nd, 2020, 7:53 pm

It's been nearly 10 years since I retired, but one day at work, we had a power cut. I opened the drawer of my desk and pulled out my slide rule and carried on calculating...
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby scullion » February 2nd, 2020, 9:57 pm

we used to have a galileo thermometer until one of the cats brought in a bird and knocked the thermometer off the shelf along with something else, both dropping onto a two foot (or more) wide bowl that i had made and smashing that, too, while trying to get the bird. i was not happy.
we have one of these - i added a bit of clear plastic tubing to the spout as it kept squirting out!
a very elderly patient i had, many moons ago, had a barometer that was made from an old jar and a bottle (like this upended in it, part filled with water. it had lived on her shelf for decades - and on her parents shelf before that. i keep meaning to make one from an old chianti bottle and jar - maybe tomorrow!
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby StokeySue » February 2nd, 2020, 10:20 pm

The barometer bottle looks like the old patent baby feeding bottles
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby Suelle » February 2nd, 2020, 10:25 pm

aero280 wrote:It's been nearly 10 years since I retired, but one day at work, we had a power cut. I opened the drawer of my desk and pulled out my slide rule and carried on calculating...


:D :D

I could lay my hands on a slide rule, but I don't remember how to use one.
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby StokeySue » February 2nd, 2020, 10:29 pm

My guess stick has long gone

Didn’t real nerds have circular slide rules.
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby Rainbow » February 2nd, 2020, 10:31 pm

Suelle wrote:
aero280 wrote:It's been nearly 10 years since I retired, but one day at work, we had a power cut. I opened the drawer of my desk and pulled out my slide rule and carried on calculating...


:D :D

I could lay my hands on a slide rule, but I don't remember how to use one.

I could never use a slide rule, despite my father and brother both trying to teach me! Or maybe because they tried and made me feel stupid ;)
I could come to terms with most maths and science I was taught at school, but the slide rule...........
And then pocket calculators came out, so I didn't worry about it :D
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby scullion » February 2nd, 2020, 10:34 pm

StokeySue wrote:The barometer bottle looks like the old patent baby feeding bottles

it was an old pop bottle.
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby aero280 » February 2nd, 2020, 10:48 pm

I never got to understand circular slide rules. A bit nerdy. But I think the hardcore nerds used cylindrical slide rules!! :)

I still have my slide rule, but it's a complex one that has loglog scales for doing hydraulic calculations where powers of numbers were not integers!! :) I don't think I could work one to its full extent now. But I have retained the ability to do rough calculations, which you needed with a slide rule to get the decimal point in the right place...
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby Herbidacious » February 5th, 2020, 10:47 am

Log tables... We weren't allowed to use calculators until Upper IV (or somesuch).
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby miss mouse » February 5th, 2020, 11:02 am

I loved log tables, so simple.
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby suffolk » February 5th, 2020, 11:28 am

We were taught to use them (logs) as a theoretical exercise ... but never how they could be of any practical use :? but then most maths was a foreign land to me in those days ... it wasn’t until an Indian pathologist told me that I should be good at maths because it’s logic and he said I was very logical ... so then I stopped being scared of maths ... but by then I was thirty years old ;)

Edit: I meant to say that the Indian pathologist was reading my palm at the time.
Last edited by suffolk on February 5th, 2020, 12:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby earthmaiden » February 5th, 2020, 12:01 pm

suffolk wrote:We were taught to use them (logs) as a theoretical exercise ... but never how they could be of any practical use :?


.. like so many things taught at school :rolleyes:. I loathed anything to do with maths or science and knew for sure I would never need logarithms. Then I studied photography (pre-digital) and then entered the water industry- guess what I needed!
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby suffolk » February 5th, 2020, 12:40 pm

A friend who used to teach photography said that he was the only person he knew who used logs :lol:
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby Herbidacious » February 5th, 2020, 12:56 pm

I think maths is rarely taught well. Those who are good at it just 'see' how things work, and don't/can't break them down sufficiently for those who don't. When I was doing the first year of my aborted pyschology degree, for some reason, I re-taught myself how to do simultaneous (I wouldn't have needed this for stats, would I?) and understood how they worked for the first time. it was quite revelatory. At school we were just shown how to do them.

I have always thought of myself as bad at maths. I just didn't really understand it, I think. Inspite of this, I suppose, I was made to take maths o'level a year early, got a B and was then made to do A/O in the fifth form. But after getting about 33% in my mocks, was allowed to drop it.
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby earthmaiden » February 5th, 2020, 1:06 pm

It does annoy me that very often schools give no hint of practical applications using what is being taught. I don't know if this has changed in the last few years but doubt it. I can remember getting extra help learning about things like compound interest but never being given any hint about why I should care. I think grown ups often forget that these things are not always obvious.
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby Seatallan » February 5th, 2020, 1:35 pm

Blimey, Scully, I take my hat off to you for passing your maths O' level. I mumphed mine at school, tried again after I graduated (was toying with the idea of a PGCE as it was then) and mumphed it again- twice... :oops: . Best I ever managed was a CSE grade 3. I was- and remain- totally useless at maths.
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby WWordsworth » February 5th, 2020, 1:41 pm

I still find my times tables useful.
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby suffolk » February 5th, 2020, 1:55 pm

WWordsworth wrote:I still find my times tables useful.


I use them every day ... :tu:
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby StokeySue » February 5th, 2020, 3:13 pm

Herbidacious wrote:Log tables... We weren't allowed to use calculators until Upper IV (or somesuch).

We couldn't have used calculators - the Sinclair Scientific, the first real pocket calculator, came out just as I left school

When I had holiday jobs in offices they used comptometers, a mechanical adding machine, Comptometer operators were paid a premium over a general clerical assistant
Unfortunately we also used them in my first year university statistics exam, I git a really poor mark despite as it turns out being reasonably contentment at practical statistics, I spent the whole exam fighting a machine I didn't understand and which kept jamming.

I think we were taught some practical applications of logarithms - I've certainly always found an ability to think in powers of 10 quite useful

The trouble with maths is that it seems that if you have the mental quirks that enable you to get a grip of the subject easily, you don't have the quirks that enable you to understand why other people find it difficult. I used to teach entry level programming, and it's fascinating how people do and don't cope with it, I'm not brilliant as either a teacher or a programmer, but not being very mathematical myself helped, as I could understand the blockages and explain them in words.
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Re: Things you rarely see these days.

Postby Seatallan » February 5th, 2020, 4:19 pm

WWordsworth wrote:I still find my times tables useful.


I was never taught them. I was at primary school during one of those 'progressive' periods where teaching tables was seen as old fashioned and unnecessary. I can remember one of our teachers playing a variation on buzz with us in an attempt to get around the stricture against tables surreptitiously and I know she didn't approve of the tables ban because she gave off at some length to my mother about it. I've definitely felt the lack of learning tables by rote and I don't think that (and other on trend methods of teaching maths at the time) helped someone like me, who was to all intents and purposes numbers dyslexic.
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