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Laburnum

PostPosted: June 5th, 2016, 10:57 am
by Zosherooney
After my not being able to remember the name of this tree recently, I picked up a local magazine of things happening in villages and spotted a place called Hazelbury Manor gardens at Box who are taking part in the NGS and have a wonderful looking laburnum tunnel. So we are taking the day off next w/e and will pay it a visit.

Two years ago I got a local blacksmith to make me a metal arch to go over our drive entrance. It was a Christmas pressie for Mr. Z. We planted 2 clematis and 2 climbing roses at each end. The clematis struggled and there is no sign of them this year. One of the roses is fine but the other is not happy. They have been fed and watered over the years but I think the soil needs more help. The idea now is to get a couple of laburnums and train them over the arch, I think it would look nice with the yellow flowers hanging down. I think the earth will be helped a lot before the laburnums go in.

Re: Laburnum

PostPosted: June 5th, 2016, 12:08 pm
by Suelle
Laburnam fell out of favour in gardens because the seeds are very toxic. My parents had a lovely tree when I was a child, and lots of the neighbours did too.

Re: Laburnum

PostPosted: June 5th, 2016, 12:30 pm
by 4dogsagain
have a wrought iron arch in my garden, which is so pretty in its own right, that I decided not to grow any creepers over it.


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Re: Laburnum

PostPosted: June 5th, 2016, 2:30 pm
by Zosherooney
Mine won't be this grand but this is the general idea https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=laburnum+arch

Hope the link works

Re: Laburnum

PostPosted: June 5th, 2016, 2:35 pm
by scullion
laburnum is a tree and would want to behave like a tree rather than a climber so it would be a waste of the arch. you could try training the trees separately.
check your soil acidity etc and then look for something suitable for the site.
it would take quite a few years to get anywhere near those in your link, i think!

how about sweet peas, trachelospermum, campsis radicans or wisteria (that only takes about five years to flower).

Re: Laburnum

PostPosted: June 5th, 2016, 5:12 pm
by Zosherooney
Thanks Scull, we have a type of jasmine over our other arch wound in with clematis, and we did try wisteria but it faded and died ! I like look of the orangey campsis but it might not like not being against a wall, will run your thoughts past Mr. Z and see what he fancies.

Re: Laburnum

PostPosted: June 5th, 2016, 6:00 pm
by suffolk
Campsis radicans loves being against a sunny wall.
For a wonderful laburnum arch google the one at Bodnant. I'm sure Mary could tell you all about it. :D

Re: Laburnum

PostPosted: June 5th, 2016, 7:27 pm
by scullion
suffolk wrote:Campsis radicans loves being against a sunny wall.

it may prefer it but it can still be trained up/tied to a pergola (sorry the site is a german one).

Re: Laburnum

PostPosted: June 27th, 2016, 6:35 am
by suffolk
Oh yes, totally agree, in the right place it's a great plant for a pergola 8-)

Re: Laburnum

PostPosted: June 27th, 2016, 7:49 am
by StokeySue
If neither wisteria nor clematis liked the situation, and wisteria is closely related to laburnum I'm not sure I fancy your chances of making a laburnum happy there unless you dig out and replace a lot of soil first

We had a beautiful laburnum when I grew up. Although the seeds are toxic they are too tough to chew, so the risk of poisoning is tiny, I believe there is no record of a poisoning in the UK

Re: Laburnum

PostPosted: June 27th, 2016, 8:35 am
by scullion
there was a beautiful, big trunked, old laburnum in the playground of my junior/infant school. it was cut down when a boy in my class ate some of the seeds and was rushed to hospital. i don't think they were going to take any chances. it was such a shame.