garlic soup

Out of the main bustle of the Coffee shop this is where people gather to share recipes and tips/tricks.

garlic soup

Postby scullion » April 16th, 2010, 9:56 am

hi, i think this may really be aimed at ian but any suggestions would be welcome.
i was shown how to make a garlic and sorrel soup while in the dordogne a few years back but as i haven't made it for a long time and didn't write it down at the time, i have forgotten how to make it! it was a clear soup (up until the (i think) optional eggs whisked in at the end) and really tasty in its simplicity. do you have a recipe for it, please?
User avatar
scullion
Registered
 
Posts: 12415
Joined: April 9th, 2010, 2:08 pm
Location: cornwall

Re: garlic soup

Postby ianinfrance » April 16th, 2010, 10:22 am

Hi Scullion.

I know two more-or-less-local garlic Soups. Both have the same name, "Tourin" but they are entirely different, just to add to the fun. The one you're likely to have had in the Dordogne/Périgord region is the "Tourin Blanchi" or white garlic soup. However, I don't have a recipe for that with sorrel, despite having several recipe books from that area.

This is the one I make regularly,also called Tourin, but it's from the Corrèze and DOES use Sorrel (as well as several other goodies. I much prefer it to the Périgordin version.

@@@@@ Now You're Cooking! Export Format

Tourin Correzien (Correze Garlic & Onion Soup)

french, soups, starters, vegetables

4 cloves garlic; or more
2 medium onions; sliced
100 gm smoked bacon; in dice
25 gm lard
500 gm tomatoes; concassee
1 tablespoon flour
1500 ml boiling water or stock
150 gm sorrel
1 salt
1 pepper
----OPTIONAL----
2 egg yolks

Peel the garlic and onion. Slice the onion finely and crush the garlic. Heat the lard in a large saucepan and start frying the bacon dice. When beginning to brown, add the onion and then the garlic. Cook over medium heat while preparing the tomatoes (peel them, deseed them and then chop coarsely), and the sorrel (remove ribs, wash on several changes of water and cut into chiffonade).

Now put the stock on to heat. When the onions are well softened, and beginning to take a little colour, add the tomatoes and continue cooking uncovered, until excess liquid is evaporated and fat re-appears. Stir in the flour, and continue stirring while the flour cooks for a minute or two. Add the boiling stock stirring continuously. Add the sorrel and give a preliminary seasoning (plenty pepper). Cook 30 minutes. May be cooked ahead to here.

If giving a liaison with egg yolks, just before serving, take out a little of the soup, allow to cool slightly and beat into the yolks. Then beat the boiling soup into the egg yolk mixture, return to the pan and heat gently until lightly thickened. DO NOT BOIL or the yolks will curdle. Correct seasoning and serve.

Notes. The original recipe gives few quantities, uses "lard gras" - salted back fat (if trying that, use less), uses water instead of stock, and makes no mention of the preparation of the tomatoes or sorrel.


Recipe IMH after "Lo Topin de la Marietta" Françoise & Luc de Goustine

Yield: 8 servings

** Exported from Now You're Cooking! v5.86 **
--
All the best
Ian
http://www.souvigne.com
The Earth is degenerating today. Bribery and corruption abound. Children no longer obey their parents, every man wants to write a book, and it is evident that the end of the world is fast approaching.
User avatar
ianinfrance
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 14668
Joined: December 31st, 2009, 5:50 pm
Location: Forgès, France

Re: garlic soup

Postby scullion » April 16th, 2010, 10:31 am

thanks ian, the one i was shown didn't have tomatoes or bacon and i know i used butter and olive oil instead of goose fat but your recipe sounds good so i will have a go at that. i am stuck in a 'soup rut' at the moment and need to break out again! thanks again
User avatar
scullion
Registered
 
Posts: 12415
Joined: April 9th, 2010, 2:08 pm
Location: cornwall

Re: garlic soup

Postby Luca » April 16th, 2010, 12:13 pm

It seems from your 'clear' comment that you might be referring to a relative of the Provencal garlic soup aigo bouido or boulido. This is a fairly typical recipe. Perhaps you could simmer some sorrel leaves into it before removing them and adding the eggs.

http://www.cookitsimply.com/recipe-0010-011754r.html
Luca
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 6149
Joined: December 31st, 2009, 2:20 pm
Location: London, UK

Re: garlic soup

Postby ianinfrance » April 16th, 2010, 5:05 pm

Hi,

I'm back from Brive now...
You're welcome for the recipe, and suspect you won't be disappointed if you have it. I think it's a delight, though it's not as predominantly garlicky as some of the other soups.

>Luca,
I think you're very possibly right. Certainly the use of butter/olive oil isn't typically Périgordin or Aquitaine generally, is it. Actually the butter isn't very provençal either for that matter.

By the way, I've just found this other version of a garlic soup

"Tourin à L'Ail Comme en Corrèze"

starter, soup, french

10 large cloves of garlic; thinly sliced
2 large onions; finely chopped
80 g duck fat (or butter :cry: )
1 tbsp plain flour
1 l. Poultry stock (duck best)lukewarm ; defatted
2 eggs; separated
20 ml red wine venegar
S&P
10 thin slices French Bread, toasted, rubbed with garlic, & drizzled with goose/duck fat

Sweat garlic & onion in fat, gently at first, then over medium high heat till well softened but not browned at all. Pale gold is perfect. Lower heat, sprinkle over the flour and cook till pale golden coloured in turn. Remove from heat.

Whisk in most of the stock, reserving 100 mls for later. Taking care to avoid lumps, heat to boiling, stirring. Simmer uncovered 30 mins or so. (If cooking in advance, allow to cool).

10 minutes before serving, start reheating the soup. Separate the eggs into two bowl. Lightly beat egg whites with a fork till just a bit frothy, and mix in the reserved stock. Set aside.

Whisk the yolks with a fork to break them up and then beat in the vinegar. The soup should be boliing by now, so pour a ladleful into the egg yolk/vinegar mixture and beat to combine then set aside.

Make sure the soup is boiling, and then remove from heat. Pour in the eggt white mixture in a thin steady stream. gently whisking the while so the white forms strands. Return the soup to low heat (don't boil) and stir in the egg yolk mixture, with a spatula, and heat VERY gently, without letting it boil, until it thickens slightly and becomes creamy.

Correct seasoning, serve forthwith accompanied by the bread croûtes.

If you wanted to make a sorrel flavoured variant, then this would be easy. Cut it into a chiffonade, add it after mixing inthe stock. You might also cook it with the onion and garlic. I'd use a handful or so.


Hope that helps.
--
All the best
Ian
http://www.souvigne.com
The Earth is degenerating today. Bribery and corruption abound. Children no longer obey their parents, every man wants to write a book, and it is evident that the end of the world is fast approaching.
User avatar
ianinfrance
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 14668
Joined: December 31st, 2009, 5:50 pm
Location: Forgès, France

Re: garlic soup

Postby scullion » April 16th, 2010, 5:18 pm

thank you so much ian, that sounds very much like it. the butter and olive oil mix was my alteration - being vegetarian, but the rest of the recipe, if not the actual one, is as near as i could imagine. it is a really tasty soup - cheers
User avatar
scullion
Registered
 
Posts: 12415
Joined: April 9th, 2010, 2:08 pm
Location: cornwall

Re: garlic soup

Postby Luca » April 16th, 2010, 5:21 pm

ianinfrance wrote:Luca,
I think you're very possibly right. Certainly the use of butter/olive oil isn't typically Périgordin or Aquitaine generally, is it. Actually the butter isn't very provençal either for that matter.



It certainly isn't is it. I think it must have been an adaptation of sorts.

I like the look of the garlic soups - with the way the weather is here in the UK we're likely to have one soon!
Luca
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 6149
Joined: December 31st, 2009, 2:20 pm
Location: London, UK

Re: garlic soup

Postby ianinfrance » April 16th, 2010, 5:23 pm

Hi Scullion
scullion wrote:the butter and olive oil mix was my alteration - being vegetarian,


Aha!!! Al is revealed. I suggest using just plain vegetable oil then. I think olive oil has too much character and while it's lovely, it isn't typical of the area. If I were doing this for a vegetarian here, I might be tempted even to try using half or a quarter walnut oil and the rest neutral oil.

Oops. Supper. Back later.

(Added)
Well, Luca, you'll see what Scullion has said. We've sussed him out!!!! :D :D :D
--
All the best
Ian
http://www.souvigne.com
The Earth is degenerating today. Bribery and corruption abound. Children no longer obey their parents, every man wants to write a book, and it is evident that the end of the world is fast approaching.
User avatar
ianinfrance
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 14668
Joined: December 31st, 2009, 5:50 pm
Location: Forgès, France

Re: garlic soup

Postby Luca » April 16th, 2010, 5:25 pm

Have indeed Ian! Bon appetit!
Luca
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 6149
Joined: December 31st, 2009, 2:20 pm
Location: London, UK

Re: garlic soup

Postby scullion » April 16th, 2010, 5:29 pm

i will take your suggestion on board, thank you --------- gosh, i like a good sussing!
User avatar
scullion
Registered
 
Posts: 12415
Joined: April 9th, 2010, 2:08 pm
Location: cornwall

Re: garlic soup

Postby ianinfrance » April 16th, 2010, 6:32 pm

Do let us know, once you've tried it, which recipe you used and what you thought of it.
--
All the best
Ian
http://www.souvigne.com
The Earth is degenerating today. Bribery and corruption abound. Children no longer obey their parents, every man wants to write a book, and it is evident that the end of the world is fast approaching.
User avatar
ianinfrance
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 14668
Joined: December 31st, 2009, 5:50 pm
Location: Forgès, France

Re: garlic soup

Postby scullion » April 17th, 2010, 1:23 pm

hi ian,
well i've just cooked the "Tourin à L'Ail Comme en Corrèze" . the vinegar (white, cos i couldn't find any red in the cupboard) was a touch too strong for my liking but as i am never too exact on weights and measures i may have put a fraction of a glug too much in -- mind you, i can't remember putting it in to the version i used to make so maybe i'm comparing it to a memory rather than tasting it for itself. other than that it was good (agreed by my partner). i will be making the other version later in the week, when back from doing the 'uni drop', up country - so i will give you the comparison verdict then. thanks again.
User avatar
scullion
Registered
 
Posts: 12415
Joined: April 9th, 2010, 2:08 pm
Location: cornwall

Re: garlic soup

Postby ianinfrance » April 17th, 2010, 1:42 pm

Hi again Scullion,
scullion wrote:the vinegar (white, cos i couldn't find any red in the cupboard) was a touch too strong for my liking but as i am never too exact on weights and measures i may have put a fraction of a glug too much in
Well yes, white is a bit sharper than red generally as well. At least you know now, so you can make a note to watch out. Did you use and sorrel as well? If so, that's quite sharp too, so that might just have made the vinegar show more as well.

I'd be interested to see how you get on with the other, which I make (fairly) regularly here. I'm planning on it for next week.

Thanks for the feedback. I'll note it as a watch point.
--
All the best
Ian
http://www.souvigne.com
The Earth is degenerating today. Bribery and corruption abound. Children no longer obey their parents, every man wants to write a book, and it is evident that the end of the world is fast approaching.
User avatar
ianinfrance
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 14668
Joined: December 31st, 2009, 5:50 pm
Location: Forgès, France

Re: garlic soup

Postby scullion » April 17th, 2010, 1:56 pm

hiya,
no, sorrel isn't out yet but i did what i have done before and used a couple of outside leaves of savoy cabbage - yes, i know it isn't the same but it was just to get that slightly bitter-ish taste and it goes ok anyway (well, in my opinion!). will try it with sorrel later in the year. salut
User avatar
scullion
Registered
 
Posts: 12415
Joined: April 9th, 2010, 2:08 pm
Location: cornwall

Re: garlic soup

Postby scullion » April 21st, 2010, 12:50 pm

hi ian, i made the other soup for lunch today, the one with the tomatoes, - and i know it was my vegetarian take on it , but i think both mine and my partners choice comes down on the side of the "Tourin à L'Ail Comme en Corrèze" but with less or no vinegar. the garlic stays at the forefront of the flavour more - and i know i could have put even more in todays soup but i think it would still have been 'clouded' by the quite powerful (fake - no don't moan at me)bacon and tomato flavours.
they are both good, lighter, more summery soups so they will both have another airing but the '-à L'Ail ' will have more! it is very like the one i remember (without vinegar). many thanks again
User avatar
scullion
Registered
 
Posts: 12415
Joined: April 9th, 2010, 2:08 pm
Location: cornwall

Re: garlic soup

Postby ianinfrance » April 21st, 2010, 2:38 pm

scullion wrote:hi ian, i made the other soup for lunch today, the one with the tomatoes, - and i know it was my vegetarian take on it , but i think both mine and my partners choice comes down on the side of the "Tourin à L'Ail Comme en Corrèze" but with less or no vinegar. the garlic stays at the forefront of the flavour more - and i know i could have put even more in todays soup but i think it would still have been 'clouded' by the quite powerful (fake - no don't moan at me)bacon and tomato flavours.
they are both good, lighter, more summery soups so they will both have another airing but the '-à L'Ail ' will have more! it is very like the one i remember (without vinegar). many thanks again


I'm very glad you enjoyed them. I made the tomatoey one for dinner yesterday, as I said on the "what are you eating"? thread. what I changed from the recipe, in the light of the time of year and the other recipe, was that I used a whole head of fresh garlic, which is a lot more "in your face", and thought it was a considerable improvement. I know this isn't for you, but I used some smoked bacon from the slab that was fattiest, and fried it well, and I felt that was an improvement too.

I must try the one you prefer whole the sorrel in the garden is young and tasty and not too sharp.

I suppose it would be fair to say that the tomato-ey one is more of a balanced soup, where the garlic is not really the predominant flavour. For some occasions, I'd suggest that it would be a better choice as a first course, while if you're craving a garlic "hit" then the other would suit better. The good thing, of course, is that they aren't mutually exclusive. One can prepare either, depending on what you feel like. I love soups and this area has some really good ones, often from a very poor tradition.
--
All the best
Ian
http://www.souvigne.com
The Earth is degenerating today. Bribery and corruption abound. Children no longer obey their parents, every man wants to write a book, and it is evident that the end of the world is fast approaching.
User avatar
ianinfrance
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 14668
Joined: December 31st, 2009, 5:50 pm
Location: Forgès, France


Return to The Kitchen

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 8 guests