fence cover planting advice

Out by the shed, near the chicken coop. The place everyone hangs out to discuss the various edibles they raise in their gardens/allotments.

fence cover planting advice

Postby Herbidacious » July 25th, 2019, 10:54 am

The bottom of our garden borders onto a school playing field. They are currently replacing the fencing and have hacked down all plants on thier side to do so. Husband took it upon himself to hack down all the palnts on our side yesterday while I was at work, so now there is (or will be) just a fence. I am not altogether happy about this from either a piravacy or security point of view.
Can anyone recommend anything to plant to rectify these things?
A rambling rose seems like a goodish idea, but might be a mare to maintain?
Of course it could be more than one plant.
It will, of course be hard to get into the ground, but we can find a way around this.
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Re: fence cover planting advice

Postby suffolk » July 25th, 2019, 10:57 am

What sort of fence is it?
What’s the soil like?
Which way does it face?
What height do you need?
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Re: fence cover planting advice

Postby Herbidacious » July 25th, 2019, 11:15 am

:)
fence: not there yet, but it looks like a solid mesh fence like this
https://firstfence.co.uk/1-8m-high-v-me ... oQQAvD_BwE
but will be double rather than single. They have not told us how high it will be. Hoping at least 8ft...
soil: clay soil in the rest of the garden, I imagine. Unworked for over a decade.
it faces: north (very slightly to the west.) This is me standing with my back to the fence holding a compass. That's right?
height: let's say 8-10ft
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Re: fence cover planting advice

Postby earthmaiden » July 25th, 2019, 11:35 am

I am no gardener but wonder if they will want things growing up their fence? I wonder about some kind of small free standing conifer(s) or tree or some bamboo fencing put on your side where you could then decide at your leisure how to fill the space. How wide is it?
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Re: fence cover planting advice

Postby suffolk » July 25th, 2019, 11:37 am

If you’re thinking of roses id go for Rosa rugosa https://www.hedgesdirect.co.uk/acatalog ... ct%20match)&utm_term=rosa%20rugosa&utm_content=Rosa%20Rugosa%20-%20Ramanus%20Rose%20Dark%20Pink%20or%20White%20(exact%20match)

Within a very few years you’ll have a dense impenetrable hedge hiding that fence, thick enough to act as a noise baffle and covered with deliciously scented blooms through the summer and gorgeous hips in the autumn and winter. It’ll be much less fussy than having to train a rambler over the fence, much less prone to disease etc and easily trimmed to keep it hedge-like if necessary.

And as EM says, it’ll be ‘free standing’ and not climbing up, supported by the fence.
Last edited by suffolk on July 25th, 2019, 11:38 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: fence cover planting advice

Postby Herbidacious » July 25th, 2019, 11:54 am

Unless they tell us otherwise, EM, I think we are planting... I suppose I could ask. They are really terrible about getting back to us though. In fact they never reply to emails at all.
It's about 40ft wide. It's as much about security as not wanting children peering through.

I suppose I could drape sheets over it in the meantime ;) (not really...)

The rose looks lovely but at 20-40cm a year it will take a while... I suppose could put potted clematis or some such up for quicker cover.

Will consult neighbour too. He will enjoy that ;)
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Re: fence cover planting advice

Postby StokeySue » July 25th, 2019, 12:41 pm

I was going to say Rosa rugosa too, we put it in a similar position, rail track and alley not school. And maintenance is easy -a light trim with a hedge trimmer, no actual pruning

We had Frau Dagmar Hastrup I think, very attractive
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Re: fence cover planting advice

Postby suffolk » July 25th, 2019, 12:45 pm

Frau Dagmar is a lovely rose, but I think it doesn’t grow as tall as some of the other R. rugosa types.
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Re: fence cover planting advice

Postby StokeySue » July 25th, 2019, 1:54 pm

David Austin says Fru Dagmar (I forgot, she’s Danish not German) is 5ft by 5ft, though I think ours was at least that

Anyway, you can select varieties suitable for hedging there as well as on the site Suffolk linked too
https://www.davidaustinroses.co.uk/type ... ection-asc
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Re: fence cover planting advice

Postby Herbidacious » July 25th, 2019, 2:02 pm

Thank you!

I guess in the meantime I could just get a screen as EM suggested.

We don't have the actual fence in place yet - just a temporary thing. They have put 'keep out' signs on our side of the fence :lol: (I realize that whether or not this a matter for a wry smile depends on which side of the fence you are on - both literally and figuratively.)
Last edited by Herbidacious on July 28th, 2019, 8:45 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: fence cover planting advice

Postby scullion » July 27th, 2019, 10:09 am

Herbidacious wrote: They have put 'keep out' signs on our side of the fence

can you turn those round‽
elaeagnus makes a good, dense, evergreen barrier with the most amazing scent at a time of year when there isn't much else perfumed in the garden.
brambles seem to grow at a hundred miles an hour in our garden - maybe you should plant some of those!
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Re: fence cover planting advice

Postby earthmaiden » July 27th, 2019, 7:41 pm

Noooo! Not brambles! :scared:
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Re: fence cover planting advice

Postby Herbidacious » July 28th, 2019, 8:49 am

We already have brambles... OH did his best to get rid of almost everything, but no doubt they will be back.

I do get a shock every time I go down there. At least there is lots of light at the moment for my sweetcorn, sweet potatoes and now achocha.

If it were a real field in the country I'd be tempted to leave it. But feel distinctly uneasy about it as things are, especially as our street seems to be being targeted for burglaries at the moment. It started off with theft from cars and has now moved up to house entry. Two in the last two weeks :o Both while the houses were unoccupied - one on holiday. And I am off on holiday next Saturday.
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Re: fence cover planting advice

Postby PatsyMFagan » August 14th, 2019, 8:27 pm

suffolk wrote:Within a very few years you’ll have a dense impenetrable hedge hiding that fence, thick enough to act as a noise baffle and covered with deliciously scented blooms through the summer and gorgeous hips in the autumn and winter. It’ll be much less fussy than having to train a rambler over the fence, much less prone to disease etc and easily trimmed to keep it hedge-like if necessary.


Wish you would tell my Rosa Rugosa that Suffs. ;) I planted mine simply because I wanted a native rose ... I don't get many blooms, no hips at all only fiendish thorns :rolleyes: :(
No-one knows if you've done your housework, but everyone knows if you've done your gardening !
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Re: fence cover planting advice

Postby suffolk » August 14th, 2019, 8:47 pm

Harrumph ... tell it you’ll replace it if it doesn’t do better than that. We could find you lots of ‘wild’ looking roses that’ll do better than that ... like this one https://www.classicroses.co.uk/roses/sh ... -rose.html :luv:
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Re: fence cover planting advice

Postby StokeySue » August 14th, 2019, 9:06 pm

Which rugosa do you have Pat? They aren’t all good producers of hips
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